or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Apartment foo-nishing
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apartment foo-nishing - Page 115

post #1711 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

You know who cares most about what their living spaces say about them? People who like ConTrad.

Unless you replace those faux historic windows, your apartment is Con Trad, foo.
post #1712 of 2411

I think you are all forgetting that Foo is going to seat his dinner guests in non-swivel, concrete-based outdoor basket chairs.

post #1713 of 2411
Hmmm.

First of all, IIRC this is a rental which foo has moved into relatively recently. Secondly, foo is relatively young - late twenties or early thirties. Don't see why imatlas has applied the impossibly high benchmark of a lifetime of experiences to this context - you can't expect him to pull off a (say) Valentino Garavani or YSL interior at this stage of his life.

More often than not living spaces happen to be reflective of the owner(s) experiences/character/whatever. When an interior is consciously/unconsciously thought out and personalised - by definition this makes it more likely to be reflective of its owner(s). That does not mean that reflecting their owners was the primary objective though.
post #1714 of 2411
This thread is such a cluster fuck of large egos and arrogance.

If anything, I truly respect Foo for being able to remain level-headed, for the most part.

The amount of anger and emotional angst some of you spew all over this thread has got to be somewhat exhausting -- why bother?
post #1715 of 2411
Aaaaarrgh!!! Arrrgghhhhh1!!!eleven!!!
post #1716 of 2411
Many of my favorite things come from the more famous manufacturers, I am not judging you for appreciating them. My point is that there is more to it than just choosing the correct assortment of these items. You seem to be taking an almost mathematical approach to this, which is hindering your result.

The aesthetics in my opinion

- A rug of that style should be used on a more rustic or rougher flooring surface such as concrete or rough wood. It's a good juxtaposition to the sofa, but the sofa is in that particular setting. I like the choice of fabric, though I think cream sofas are a PITA. I would rather have a color which looks unaffected by use or a material which improves with use (SIF leather for example)

- The room is crowded, the sofa is too large for the space and the coffee table is both too large for the sofa and the space. I understand why you would keep the sofa (temporary space, expensive sofa), but I do not understand compounded that trouble with the table. When it comes to furniture size if it needs to be pushed against the wall it is either too big or too much. Furniture should only be up against the wall if it is specifically the intention of the design.

- I understand the need for a lounge chair in the room, but I think it also adds to how crowded the room is and you would be better off without it being in the space permanently. (move the eames chair in when needed).

- I dislike spotlights for this setting, they are too intense for settings such as this, a shaded light would be much better and more comfortable to be around. If a fabric shade is not preferred then a metal or glass shade would be good.
post #1717 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

You're never going to figure this out, are you? The brand of furniture in a great interior is almost inconsequential. It's not a prescriptive formula whereby X brand furniture makes Y space beautiful. There is a correlation between those brands and great interiors because the people with great interior spaces simply buy higher quality furniture. There's nothing less valid about a simple wood chair that you could find in any schoolhouse being used as a dining chair, or any little metal cafe table you could find all over Paris being used a dining table. Regardless, much like clothing style, a general poetic atmosphere exists in all those spaces; some being formal and rigid, others being ostentatious and gay, and others being sparse and monastic. I don't even really look at furniture in the interiors I like, because I'm almost solely focused on whether the space has material and lighting qualities that I'd find suitable. If I took over most of those rooms as they are, I'd end up removing most of the things inside them (which you might be ascribing the room's beauty to), simply because I want as little in a space as possible. I don't have the personality type that seeks accumulation of oddities in a way that Labelking or Saint Laurent or other people successfully do, so in the case of each interior, I'd probably just have a wood desk and a couch in each. I couldn't impress you about "executing" the interior, simply because I don't give a shit about decorating a room to impress you.

Evidently, you're reading comprehension is as poor as your reasoning.

I never said there is a "prescriptive formula whereby X brand furniture makes Y space beautiful." Completely the opposite, actually. SG launched a critique based on our decision to go with certain major brands rather than buy handcrafted goods from this or that artisan. I countered by explaining why the sources used shouldn't influence his aesthetic judgment of our space, and that given our circumstances, it made perfect sense to use major, proven manufacturers.

So, when are you going to figure out that our apartment is not a grand, notable architectural space, nor are we pretending it to be? We are simply trying to make the most of what we have. If you are not interested in how one makes use of a modest space, then get the hell out of my thread. Clearly, the subject matter does not interest you, and I am not interested in your misdirected, misguided, nonsensical critique.

I find your claim that furniture and other items in an interior don't influence your judgment of it to be highly specious. The walls of a building are not the only things that determine the space inside. A sofa, a table, a sculpture, etc., each transform that space in some way. Were Corbusier or Mies van der Rohe lesser architects or flawed in their architectural approach because they cared enough about furniture to design it themselves? Give up this absurd posturing.
post #1718 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Aaaaarrgh!!! Arrrgghhhhh1!!!eleven!!!

Why do you do this to yourself?

Get a check on your emotions, mister. There are far more important things to stress out over than some random person's living room aesthetics, over which you will have no sway, whatsoever (as evidenced by this thread).
post #1719 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


I find your claim that furniture and other items in an interior don't influence your judgment of it to be highly specious.

I don't care about the furniture. I care about how well I could live inside it, or how well it seems that the person who assembled whatever they like can live in it. Lots of the interiors I post I wouldn't want to live in because they are stylistically too heavy handed for me. That doesn't make them less great. I'm not vouching for their furniture or style. I'm vouching for the tangibly honest pursuit of enriched living. This whole compositional notion of your room and all its vanity would be acceptable if you never asked us about it and just fucking did it because you were autonomously motivated to do it. I'd just assume you liked all that stuff exactly how it is. But asking everybody for help and arriving at this highly organized "composition" that strives for perfection? It's just really strained and contradictory. Regardless, good luck with it. I'm sure there's a whole bunch of people of like-minded persuasion that might really love your "execution."
post #1720 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Someone please help me understand: how are so many of you able to go on sub-Saharan safaris and herd yaks with Tibetan nomads frequently enough to outfit your homes entirely with exotic baubles gifted to you by thankful tribal chiefs, yet must resort to buying your clothes from My.Suit.com and websites with names like "Luxire?"

You guys all live in la-la land, and I suspect it is furnished by Pottery Barn.
post #1721 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

Why do you do this to yourself?

Get a check on your emotions, mister. There are far more important things to stress out over than some random person's living room aesthetics, over which you will have no sway, whatsoever (as evidenced by this thread).

Aren't you the guy who blew his bank account to lease a BMW? Regardless, if I sound angry I'm not. Just critical.
post #1722 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

I don't care about the furniture. I care about how well I could live inside it, or how well it seems that the person who assembled whatever they like can live in it. Lots of the interiors I post I wouldn't want to live in because they are stylistically too heavy handed for me. That doesn't make them less great. I'm not vouching for their furniture or style. I'm vouching for the tangibly honest pursuit of enriched living. This whole compositional notion of your room and all its vanity would be acceptable if you never asked us about it and just fucking did it because you were autonomously motivated to do it. I'd just assume you liked all that stuff exactly how it is. But asking everybody for help and arriving at this highly organized "composition" that strives for perfection? It's just really strained and contradictory. Regardless, good luck with it. I'm sure there's a whole bunch of people of like-minded persuasion that might really love your "execution."

Why make these ridiculous assumptions to begin with?

Has it occurred to you that I simply posted this because I thought it would be fun to chat about it? And, like I said, to get ideas we hadn't thought of before? You continue to insist that my motivation is to win approval or follow consensus. I don't think the facts could possibly prove you more wrong on both counts.
post #1723 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Aren't you the guy who blew his bank account to lease a BMW? Regardless, if I sound angry I'm not. Just critical.

No, my bank account is quite financially healthy, actually. Healthiest it's ever been, to be frank.

I buy things I can afford.
post #1724 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Do you think those are questions I concern myself when I think of how to dress? Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I do not aim for my aesthetic choices to "reflect" anything about me. What I care about is developing my taste, surrounding myself with beautiful things, and living in a beautiful space. Perhaps this gets at why you think there is such dissonance between the way I dress and the way I've furnished my living space. I've said time and time again that purposeful, directed attempts at "personal expression" are a delusional folly. If there is anything worth saying about yourself, it shouldn't need to be said, and you shouldn't care to say it.

When I look at our living room, I see a beautiful living space. That is ultimately all I care about. Moreover, I'm not sure how easy it is to put together a space that is as beautiful to me. After all, I find most interiors dreadfully ugly. I don't care if it looks like an "interesting" person lives there. I don't judge based on the number of random baubles collected through various hobbies and vacations. What I look for is how the space is organized, how the individual pieces composing the space are designed, how well they are made, and how well their individuals designs complement each other. You're underestimating the time and effort put into our living room. Many, many years of thought went into it, even if some of the precise pieces had not been settled on yet. The truth is, there are probably a half dozen other coffee tables we could have picked, or a half dozen other lounge chairs, and the room would still look equally beautiful to me. But, I spent a lot of time thinking about what qualifies as beautiful, and ultimately, you have to settle on something.

Consider this: when I judge an outfit, I don't ask myself how much I tell about him as a person. I ask myself if his pocket square is too distracting, if the pattern of his shirt is too similar to that of his jacket, whether there are divots or dimples or ski jumps in his shoulder line, etc. This is analogous to how I think of my home.

So, if there is anything that I hope can be said about me based on our living room, it would simply be: "This guy cares a lot about living in a beautiful space." If that's the only takeaway point, I'm more than content.

Again, you underestimate the time spent and knowledge accumulated in this process. More importantly, the decisions have to be made at a certain point, regardless of how ready you are. We are not going to live in an empty apartment until we have exhausted all efforts at research.

Do you think it matters whether you consciously ask yourself these questions when you think of how to dress?

I find it amusing that the creator of the One Shirt and the One Shoe rejects the idea that your aesthetic choices reflect anything about you. Of course they do - they are reflective of your time and place, of your personal history, of the image that you wish to present to the world, of your depth of sartorial knowledge and experience. You say that "directed attempts at personal expression are a delusional folly", and yet you spend more time than virtually anyone else on the board searching for the perfect combination of unique style while striving at all times to remain within the rules. Fundamentally what you are opposed to is not directed personal expression, it is free expression, that is, expression that ignores the history and traditions of MC (and good taste).

Your living room is a tasteful room that falls well within the history and traditions of modern design, if not without some issues of execution, as already noted extensively in the thread. As it stands, it's the equivalent of a navy suit with a rep tie, a white shirt, white PS and black captoe oxfords. Safely inside the rules, but not very foo.gif.
post #1725 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post

No, my bank account is quite financially healthy, actually. Healthiest it's ever been, to be frank.

I buy things I can afford.

Good. That's the way it should be.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Apartment foo-nishing