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Apartment foo-nishing - Page 114

post #1696 of 2411
If I had to guess, the most costly time period to make these walls adjusted for inflation would have been in the 60's or 70's. Before then, you'd have had more available quality wood but much higher production and shipping costs. After the 70's or 80's, you'd have much, much more expensive quality wood but much cheaper production costs with varying choices in quality and mounting supports. If the building was from the mid 90's that would be close to ideal, because I think that's when they started to get the more advanced veneering machinery.
post #1697 of 2411
It looks like bird's eye maple to me too.
post #1698 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

If I had to guess, the most costly time period to make these walls adjusted for inflation would have been in the 60's or 70's. Before then, you'd have had more available quality wood but much higher production and shipping costs. After the 70's or 80's, you'd have much, much more expensive quality wood but much cheaper production costs with varying choices in quality and mounting supports. If the building was from the mid 90's that would be close to ideal, because I think that's when they started to get the more advanced veneering machinery.

This place also looks like it has large wooden paneled walls.

post #1699 of 2411
post #1700 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post




Note to foo: If you need a fur blanket, skip the bullshit and get the entire animal.
post #1701 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Note to foo: If you need a fur blanket, skip the bullshit and get the entire animal.

That room has an organic sense of style, like it was slowly accumulated over the years. He also appears to be wearing leather pants.
post #1702 of 2411
For anyone looking for exotic veneers.

http://www.sg-veneers.com
post #1703 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

Foo, do you feel that this apartment is an accurate reflection of who you are? What do you expect me to know about you when I look at it? Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

I ask because sartorially you have gone through a brutally thorough and iterative process to arrive at your style, and as a result, you own it fully. It is an accurate reflection of who you want us to see. When I look at how you dress, I see someone who is meticulous in his concerns for fit and coordination, and who has a very personal twist on a traditionalist approach. In your own very understated way I'd say that you're actually quite flamboyant. (The One Shoe and The One Shirt are both examples of this).

When I look at your room, the most expressive objects are the money cat and the glass globes. They both tell a bit of a story - that you are proud of your family and background, and that you like plants and are capable of keeping them alive. Nothing else about the room tells me anything about you other than that you can assemble a visually appealing cluster of furniture that you have acquired. It is boring, anonymous and unoriginal. Even the globes have long since lost reverted from camp back to kitsch.

All of which is surprising to me, honestly. The very last adjectives that I would use to describe you sartorially are "boring, anonymous and unoriginal". As I said, in your own way I think you're kind of flashy. You make very deliberate choices that tastefully buck convention while staying within the rules. You've done none of that here. Your living room could be one of ten thousand on apartmenttherapy, or a spare room in some over decorated apartment from just about any time in the last 40 years.

If you had approached decorating in any way like you have approached your sartorial style, the last thing you would have done would be to order a bunch of balls from Flora Grubb, or a rug from some rug dealer's website that you yourself were mistrustful of, or going back to Cappellini for more broken furniture. No, you would have gathered your own collection of interesting objets from junk shops and high end antique stores and filled them with the most unique epiphytes and bromeliads, harvested and brought back from a canoe trip up the Amazon. You would have traveled to the Atlas Mountains and met with the young girl whose wedding blanket you would one day acquire. The coffee table would have been the work of years of collaboration with a cantankerous old furniture maker in Kyoto who only communicates in calligraphy. No one who looked at the room for a moment could ever doubt that anybody else lives in that room but the foo.gif

In short,


Do you think those are questions I concern myself when I think of how to dress?

I do not aim for my aesthetic choices to "reflect" anything about me. What I care about is developing my taste, surrounding myself with beautiful things, and living in a beautiful space. Perhaps this gets at why you think there is such dissonance between the way I dress and the way I've furnished my living space. I've said time and time again that purposeful, directed attempts at "personal expression" are a delusional folly. If there is anything worth saying about yourself, it shouldn't need to be said, and you shouldn't care to say it.

When I look at our living room, I see a beautiful living space. That is ultimately all I care about. Moreover, I'm not sure how easy it is to put together a space that is as beautiful to me. After all, I find most interiors dreadfully ugly. I don't care if it looks like an "interesting" person lives there. I don't judge based on the number of random baubles collected through various hobbies and vacations. What I look for is how the space is organized, how the individual pieces composing the space are designed, how well they are made, and how well their individuals designs complement each other. You're underestimating the time and effort put into our living room. Many, many years of thought went into it, even if some of the precise pieces had not been settled on yet. The truth is, there are probably a half dozen other coffee tables we could have picked, or a half dozen other lounge chairs, and the room would still look equally beautiful to me. But, I spent a lot of time thinking about what qualifies as beautiful, and ultimately, you have to settle on something.

Consider this: when I judge an outfit, I don't ask myself how much I tell about him as a person. I ask myself if his pocket square is too distracting, if the pattern of his shirt is too similar to that of his jacket, whether there are divots or dimples or ski jumps in his shoulder line, etc. This is analogous to how I think of my home.

So, if there is anything that I hope can be said about me based on our living room, it would simply be: "This guy cares a lot about living in a beautiful space." If that's the only takeaway point, I'm more than content.
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

Maybe not for you, but it certainly is for Foo. How many threads does it really take to decorate Foo's apartment, after all? I mean, it's easy to say "it's just furniture, how much does it really say", but that seems totally antithetical to the intellectual approach that Foo claims to be taking. Of course, the fact is that he decorated it out of catalogs, showrooms and the internet in the space of less than three months, which is pretty much the opposite of carefully developing, refining and honing an aesthetic of home decor.

Again, you underestimate the time spent and knowledge accumulated in this process. More importantly, the decisions have to be made at a certain point, regardless of how ready you are. We are not going to live in an empty apartment until we have exhausted all efforts at research.
post #1704 of 2411
Look at LK's apartment, it's a perfect match to his style and personality (at least as I perceive it via the internet). Same thing for Stephen as I've interpreted from his search for things like wooden plan files which is something an architect would need or want to have. Take a look at Matt's house and you sort of expect Matt to be there.

You're an eccentric, the place where you live should reflect that.

I don't see the guy who bespoke a classic wardrobe from very highly skilled and also relatively obscure craftsman as the same guy purchasing wall mounted plant orbs and buying almost religiously from the LVMH's of furniture. It's not a bad thing in itself, but I sort of expected you to find some interesting craftsperson or delve slightly deeper into this.

Knoll, HM, and Cappellini make great furniture (mostly), but it can't be everything.
Edited by SkinnyGoomba - 9/2/13 at 10:05am
post #1705 of 2411
You all do realize that when you get older you will end up saying "fuck it" and all end up with something like this for a coffee table:

post #1706 of 2411
I'm on board with that.
post #1707 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Look at LK's apartment, it's a perfect match to his style and personality (at least as I perceive it via the internet). Same thing for Stephen as I've interpreted from his search for things like wooden plan files which is something an architect would need or want to have. Take a look at Matt's house and you sort of expect Matt to be there.

You're an eccentric, the place where you live should reflect that.

I don't see the guy who bespoke a classic wardrobe from very highly skilled and also relatively obscure craftsman as the same guy purchasing wall mounted plant orbs and buying almost religiously from the LVMH's of furniture. It's not a bad thing in itself, but I sort of expected you to find some interesting craftsperson or delve slightly deeper into this.

Knoll, HM, and Cappellini make great furniture (mostly), but it can't be everything.

Again, I don't care to make my living room "reflect" anything about my personality.

You are forgetting one key fact: I picked what's in my living room--whatever it is, is what it is. If anything, you should take our living room to reveal an aspect of my taste you may not have been aware of or don't understand yet, rather than assume it contradicts who I am as a person. When confronted with two ideas that seem contradictory, I try my best to reconcile them before assuming one must be false, don't you?

Also, I cannot help but think you are being highly selective, even prejudicial, in your analysis. Matt has a great apartment, but from what I know and have seen, very little if any of his things are of the handcrafted-by-an-eccentric-artisan variety. Why no contradiction there? As for SH: I have evidence of his ability to pick out attractive professional photographs of interiors, but none whatsoever of his ability to execute anything in real life. Similarly, there are plenty of men in MC who can find and post photos of well-dressed, stylish people--but how many can dress themselves? Let's get real. I could not care less about whether he has shown interest in this or that handcrafted object.

Are you really sure you aren't simply characterizing me the way you want to? You claim that buying most of my furniture from the likes of Cappellini, Knoll, etc, makes me somehow less original or authentic or "myself." This is patently ridiculous. First, there are only four major pieces of furniture in our living room (not counting the rug, which isn't from any of the major manufacturers you allude to). That is not a large enough sample to determine whether I am a brand whore or simply choosing the more reliable, more proven sources for the small space we are working with--which is to say nothing of my attempt to buy my first choice coffee table from a small, boutique manufacturer. Second, take a look at Matt's apartment and SH's photographs: easily 90%+ of all the furniture is from one of the major modern/contemporary design houses. Knoll and Herman Miller and Vitra alone probably account for 60-70% of everything in SH's favored interiors. You are straining to distinguish me from the others.

If you aren't, feel free to speak in strictly aesthetic terms. How do the colors and textures complement each other? Does the space make the best use of the available light? Is everything efficiently laid out? Come on. Let's get past all this ridiculous amateur ad hominem psychoanalysis and talk about what you're actually looking at.
Edited by mafoofan - 9/2/13 at 11:32am
post #1708 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Also, someone tell me, what is wrong with the plant balls? They bring plant life into a small space with limited sunlight and require minimal care. "They're kitschy" is a bullshit answer.
post #1709 of 2411
Thread Starter 
You know who cares most about what their living spaces say about them? People who like ConTrad.
post #1710 of 2411
You're never going to figure this out, are you? The brand of furniture in a great interior is almost inconsequential. It's not a prescriptive formula whereby X brand furniture makes Y space beautiful. There is a correlation between those brands and great interiors because the people with great interior spaces simply buy higher quality furniture. There's nothing less valid about a simple wood chair that you could find in any schoolhouse being used as a dining chair, or any little metal cafe table you could find all over Paris being used a dining table. Regardless, much like clothing style, a general poetic atmosphere exists in all those spaces; some being formal and rigid, others being ostentatious and gay, and others being sparse and monastic. I don't even really look at furniture in the interiors I like, because I'm almost solely focused on whether the space has material and lighting qualities that I'd find suitable. If I took over most of those rooms as they are, I'd end up removing most of the things inside them (which you might be ascribing the room's beauty to), simply because I want as little in a space as possible. I don't have the personality type that seeks accumulation of oddities in a way that Labelking or Saint Laurent or other people successfully do, so in the case of each interior, I'd probably just have a wood desk and a couch in each. I couldn't impress you about "executing" the interior, simply because I don't give a shit about decorating a room to impress you.
Edited by StephenHero - 9/2/13 at 11:45am
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