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Apartment foo-nishing - Page 110

post #1636 of 2411
Foo,

What makes your living room less bullshit than this annoying bitch's wardrobe?









post #1637 of 2411
It would appear that SH holds a view of Foo contrary to the conventional wisdom. The typical knock on him is his perceived obstinacy, but SH sees him as a weathervane.

Not sure of the significance of this, but it seemed worth noting.
post #1638 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Foo,

What makes your living room less bullshit than this annoying bitch's wardrobe?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)









Except for the hats, she looks great.
post #1639 of 2411
Thread Starter 
If you look at the first diagram I posted, you can see exactly how and why things changed. It all really has to do with the rug. I knew nothing about rugs before starting this project. I learned a little bit here, but then went off and did my own research elsewhere. This goes to my point about refining one's own taste: the more you learn, the more your preferences tend to change. While we still wound up with a cream and black(ish) rug with a geometric pattern, the one we wound up with is much nicer and better made than the one we originally contemplated. As a side benefit, by getting a Beni Ourain, we were able to get an all-wool, high-texture, hand-knotted rug for much, much less than other options. Once we changed the rug, we started thinking differently about everything else. The Lotus lounge chair, which I picked out early on, still made sense, so never changed. By spending more on our rug than planned, we had to take funds away from somewhere else, and sacrificed the Mirror Ball lamps. After actually moving into the apartment and setting up what we had, we realized there was no way we could put a side table next to the lounge chair, so we began thinking about other options, leading us to the Bouroullec metal side table by the sofa. The original Arktura coffee table was not made well and was heavily damaged on delivery, so we went to our backup option, the Simplon, which I had spotted at Cappellini when I was scoping out the Lotus. A friend of mine attested to his own good experience with the Simplon, and I made the order. That's about it.
post #1640 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

Except for the hats, she looks great.

The hats are to keep her hair dry.
post #1641 of 2411
lol8[1].gif
post #1642 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

No, I reject them because they aren't convincing. Which is a pretty damned good reason to reject an argument--the best reason actually. Obviously you believe otherwise:

What the fuck can I say to that? You go live in your world where you believe unconvincing things, and I will stay the fuck away from you and that world.

Holy crap. I get it now. The sun of illumination shines upon me. Foo's entire SF career has just snapped into focus.

Foo does not know what a conversation is. He thinks "conversation" and "argument" are synonymous.

Foo, on a visceral level, this isn't going to make any sense to you, but I'm sure you can follow along on a purely intellectual basis.

First, a conversation is not an argument. It is a very different thing, to quote a quite interesting essay in The Economist on the art of conversation,

The first three of those options are plain instrumental speech, and are the sort of approaches that the conversation manuals warn you against. The fourth one alone leads into the realm of conversation as such. Here the purpose of speaking is not so much to get a point across, more to find out what others think about it. This principle of co-operation is one of the things that sets conversation apart from other superficially similar activities such as lectures, debates, arguments and meetings.

http://www.economist.com/node/8345491

Most -- well, some -- of us come to SF to have a conversation. We are not so much interested in finding the correct answer -- or proving that the answer we already have is correct -- as we are in exploring ideas and being exposed to new points of view.

So in an argument you advance a proposition, someone responds with a counter-proposition and you respond with, "No, that's wrong because . . . " But in a conversation, you advance a proposition, someone responds with a counter-proposition, and you might respond, "That's interesting. Would you think the same if [slightly different hypothetical] Why or why not?" The focus is on getting inside the other person's argument and understanding it and its implications rather than rejecting it or "proving" that it's wrong.

Which leads me to the second point, and this is key. Most of the things we discuss -- and the arguments you have -- do not admit to any sort of "correct" answer. Rather, there are different ways of looking at the same thing. Many of which, in that they are internally consistent, are equally valid. Even those that are somewhat contradictory can provide interesting insight.

For example, Dopey's observation about pattern matching was both interesting and insightful. It would have been a fascinating tangent to explore. It is -- and there is no other way to put this -- stupid to reject it out of hand, especially on the basis that you cannot apply the same pattern matching rules to interior decor that you apply to clothing. Dopey can and Dopey does. To say that you are not "convinced" is ever stupider. Not convinced of what? That Dopey can and Dopey does? That there is a pattern matching rule in the archetypal realm of home decor rules-of-thumb?

Dopey has a different way of seeing this problem than you do. His way is not objectively wrong. It is just different. And because it is different, it is interesting. If you can come to appreciate how Dopey thinks or, yes, how Stephen Hero thinks, you will have learned something. Once you get inside Dopey's argument, you might even say, "I don't really look at it this way, and it doesn't bother me. But I can appreciate that some people do look at it this way and how it might bother them. Now that I understand how they think, I can make these changes that are perfectly fine with me and address their concerns."

Now, yeah, this might be kind of silly in this context. I don't know how often, if ever, Dopey will be sitting in your living room staring at your carpet. But this is an incredibly useful skill in life. Master it, if you can.

And if you can't, you would be well-advised to fake it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post


This is just begging to be photoshopped. Where's edmorel?
post #1643 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Foo,

What makes your living room less bullshit than this annoying bitch's wardrobe?

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)









 

I can't lie... I have a love/hate relationship with Anna Del Russo. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sugarbutch View Post

It would appear that SH holds a view of Foo contrary to the conventional wisdom. The typical knock on him is his perceived obstinacy, but SH sees him as a weathervane.

Not sure of the significance of this, but it seemed worth noting.

I also believe that SH's view/criticism of Foo is ultimately the same with his other critics. 

post #1644 of 2411
What is it with women from Bari and man hands? It must've been the mustard gas.

Foo's a lawyer. I would think that would dictate much of his manner and personally I see nothing wrong with it. It's entertaining. Also, much like Ms. Della Russo, he seems (to me anyway) to desire a semiotic interpretation of personal style.
post #1645 of 2411


And just so Foo doesn't feel too chuffed, here's a picture of me in one of my David Reeves suits.
post #1646 of 2411
Bounder, you strike me as somebody who lives badly, and with a good deal of mold.
post #1647 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post


This is just begging to be photoshopped. Where's edmorel?

The cock-and-balls vase would make a great replacement for the hat. Foo, you're deft with the 'shop. Care to work this up for us?
post #1648 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Foo's a lawyer. I would think that would dictate much of his manner and personally I see nothing wrong with it.

I know, and I really don't get it. Learning to get inside arguments and appreciating ambiguity are pounded into American lawyers from day 1. I have remarked before that I do not understand how he is able to function. I'm guessing he is doing transactional work where you can get away with a little more rigidity. But even there, intellectual flexibility can be pretty important.
Quote:
It's entertaining.

So is a trainwreck, if you are into that sort of thing. The Foo emoticon could just as easily be the guy eating popcorn.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post



And just so Foo doesn't feel too chuffed, here's a picture of me in one of my David Reeves suits.

Wow. That's some divot.
post #1649 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Bounder, you strike me as somebody who lives badly,

Thank you. I like to think so.
Quote:
and with a good deal of mold.

Only on my cheese.
post #1650 of 2411
I like the idea raised that color is not necessary in a room and that people add the life (color) to the room. It reminds me of traditional Japanese rooms. In the minimalist Japanese villas you see very little color, but the people (usually wearing colorful kimonos) add the life to the room.
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