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The German language - Page 7

post #91 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
Yeah, being norwegian, I've spend quite a bit of time in Iceland (one of my earliest memories is of the waiting lounge at Keflavik Int'l Airport) and its a doozy though. My boss speaks fluent norwegain, danish, swedish, dutch, german, and yiddish and has a solid grasp of finnish, so i think he'll do ok.

In that case I think he'll do fine.
post #92 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddy Love View Post
Aah. One more thing about german language.

They never say "yes". They always say "Ja". One would almost think that they believe that "Ja" is english. Ja or no?

They don't say "no" either. They do say "nein!"
post #93 of 106
Could prove useful in role-playing.
post #94 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrchapel View Post
They don't say "no" either. They do say "nein!"
That's both wrong. You don't know what you're talking about.
post #95 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Sand View Post
That's both wrong. You don't know what you're talking about.

Then what is correct? I took German for 4 years in high school and 3 years in College. Both instructors were from Germany and that's what we were taught as far as how they say "no" in German. Please enlighten me.
post #96 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrchapel View Post
Then what is correct? I took German for 4 years in high school and 3 years in College. Both instructors were from Germany and that's what we were taught as far as how they say "no" in German. Please enlighten me.

my mom is from the southwest corner of germany, born about a mile from the Rhine, across which is Alsace. There they don't nay "nein", they say it "neeh". They also pronounce "vielleicht" as if it were "fill-eesht".
post #97 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
my mom is from the southwest corner of germany, born about a mile from the Rhine, across which is Alsace. There they don't nay "nein", they say it "neeh". They also pronounce "vielleicht" as if it were "fill-eesht".

Well that's a regional difference. Anyone who has taken German or knows anything about German language knows that someone from Berlin will speak it differently than someone from Salzburg and vice versae.
post #98 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
my mom is from the southwest corner of germany, born about a mile from the Rhine, across which is Alsace. There they don't nay "nein", they say it "neeh". They also pronounce "vielleicht" as if it were "fill-eesht".

The "eesht" is the regional difference. Most Germans will pronounce it "ichked" which is difficult for a native English speaker to pronounce. Unfortunately, when I took German they made us learn it the hard way instead of with the regional dialect.
post #99 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by montecristo#4 View Post
The "eesht" is the regional difference. Most Germans will pronounce it "ichked" which is difficult for a native English speaker to pronounce. Unfortunately, when I took German they made us learn it the hard way instead of with the regional dialect.

Yeah "hochdeutsch". Its about as real as the "hollywood dialect" of the Golden Age, when movie stars always seemed vaguely british.
post #100 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by montecristo#4 View Post
The "eesht" is the regional difference. Most Germans will pronounce it "ichked" which is difficult for a native English speaker to pronounce. Unfortunately, when I took German they made us learn it the hard way instead of with the regional dialect.

Interesting. My college instructor taught us to say it "v-leisht" where the ch is a soft sh. "Ich" was "Esh". High school was different; taught us that the ch was a k sound; "Ich" was "Eek". Rather odd.
post #101 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrchapel View Post
Interesting. My college instructor taught us to say it "v-leisht" where the ch is a soft sh. "Ich" was "Esh". High school was different; taught us that the ch was a k sound; "Ich" was "Eek". Rather odd.

That V was pronounced as an F, right? If not, that was one stupendoulsy underqualified teacher.
post #102 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
That V was pronounced as an F, right? If not, that was one stupendoulsy underqualified teacher.

Yes, the sound was in the form of an F, according to the rules of pronunciation for German. However, when she spoke quick snippets of German from time to time, it sounded like a V.
post #103 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
my mom is from the southwest corner of germany, born about a mile from the Rhine, across which is Alsace. There they don't nay "nein", they say it "neeh". They also pronounce "vielleicht" as if it were "fill-eesht".

Are you sure that's not the knights who say 'neeh!'
post #104 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
my mom is from the southwest corner of germany, born about a mile from the Rhine, across which is Alsace. There they don't nay "nein", they say it "neeh". They also pronounce "vielleicht" as if it were "fill-eesht".

It is well know the Germans from that region make fun and jokes of the Greeks, because for the Greeks nee = Yes
post #105 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
Yeah "hochdeutsch". Its about as real as the "hollywood dialect" of the Golden Age, when movie stars always seemed vaguely british.


No, no.
Some of my fellow Germans do speak some dialect at home, that depends on what region of Germany they are from, but I for instance never did. Hochdeutsch is all I can speak. Also starting at school, dialects are rarely used officially, that also depending on where exactly in Germany you are.
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