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Where to start - Page 3

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunivan View Post

I've been soaking up the site a little bit and see references to black tie rigs, i'm not there yet, but can you really eff that up? Isn't a tux "in style" for a while if you go the trad route?

So easy to get right but so easy to fuck up. Go to www.blacktieguide.com, follow the advice there, and you will not fuck it up. Feel free to ask for more advice on a tuxedo and search around the forum when the time comes, but I don't want to turn this into a black tie thread if you're not there yet.
post #32 of 44
Thread Starter 

thanks archibald and to all others for the insight. 

 

is there an area of dress that the newer folks to it kind of miss or don't think of? for me I think its shoes, but I don't really consider ties/belts that much. Any insight on that?

post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mensimageconsultant View Post

The label is very unlikely to be seen. That leaves clothing discussion, at work. If asked, "I get my shirts from Charles Tyrwhitt" might come across as uppity. More likely to be asked due to dressing well. Maybe it would go better as, "I get my shirts from Charles Tyrwhitt - it has great sales" smile.gif

What sort of prissy junior high do you go to? When (and it happens very rarely) people ask where I got something, I tell them honestly. I don't buy brands to tell people about them and I don't buy brands to not tell people about them. I buy things that fit me well and are well made.

If you want to act like this idea of "satisfaction" is such an important thing that you advise against buy multiples of anything (yes, I too understand the laws of marginal utility), shouldn't you understand the satisfaction of buying something well-made that you love and feel good in? Isn't that much more important than having to have some cheesy-ass line like, "I get my shirts at CT - they have great sales!"? If anything, admitting that you only buy your clothing because of the price interjects something that didn't previously exist into the conversation. They didn't ask you how much it cost. Why bring it up?
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by eluther View Post


  They didn't ask you how much it cost. Why bring it up?

some people get jelous and its avoiding problems. more true among people you have to see everytday like coworkers.

people will spend $500-600 a month on a car payment but cannot understand that you would pay over 20 for pants or anything past gap prices  is too much

if he has a passive personality it works out better

post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by eluther View Post

What sort of prissy junior high do you go to? When (and it happens very rarely) people ask where I got something, I tell them honestly. I don't buy brands to tell people about them and I don't buy brands to not tell people about them. I buy things that fit me well and are well made.

If you want to act like this idea of "satisfaction" is such an important thing that you advise against buy multiples of anything (yes, I too understand the laws of marginal utility), shouldn't you understand the satisfaction of buying something well-made that you love and feel good in? Isn't that much more important than having to have some cheesy-ass line like, "I get my shirts at CT - they have great sales!"? If anything, admitting that you only buy your clothing because of the price interjects something that didn't previously exist into the conversation. They didn't ask you how much it cost. Why bring it up?

+1000
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrow View Post

some people get jelous and its avoiding problems.

Then those people shouldn't be asking for the label of your shirts. If they do, then any resulting jealously is a result of their own stupidity.
post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by becnal View Post

Then those people shouldn't be asking for the label of your shirts. If they do, then any resulting jealously is a result of their own stupidity.

+1.
post #38 of 44

others said about buying too much too early which is true, however do start buying some and and trying stuff out instead of just reading

like Thomas J. Watson said "If you want to succeed, double your failure rate" ;) My warderobe is so decimated I can afford few mistakes.

Because if something sucks real bad I can degrade it to home/uber_casual and still looks good enough by realworld standards.

I learned a lot from buying stuff that was short of ideal. Maybe though sticking to sales/outlet/thrift store is a good idea cause it's money :)

We won't get it right the first time, so accept failure along the way. I think as a fellow noobie this approach serves me well. I'm doing lots of reading&research in between, but honestly I wouldn't wanna wait few months/years(I think it would take me half a decade of extensive research to catch up with guys like NOBD :S ) before buying new clothes because I need improvement asap, goodluck!!!


Edited by wojt - 6/14/13 at 10:31am
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by eluther View Post

What sort of prissy junior high do you go to? When (and it happens very rarely) people ask where I got something, I tell them honestly. I don't buy brands to tell people about them and I don't buy brands to not tell people about them. I buy things that fit me well and are well made.

If you want to act like this idea of "satisfaction" is such an important thing that you advise against buy multiples of anything (yes, I too understand the laws of marginal utility), shouldn't you understand the satisfaction of buying something well-made that you love and feel good in? Isn't that much more important than having to have some cheesy-ass line like, "I get my shirts at CT - they have great sales!"? If anything, admitting that you only buy your clothing because of the price interjects something that didn't previously exist into the conversation. They didn't ask you how much it cost. Why bring it up?

Because many people probably assume that a British-sounding (or European-sounding) brand is expensive and that an American who buys mostly European brands is a clothes horse. For some kinds of lawyers, image is extremely important.

To dunivan, belt and tie quality aren't big issues, provided the materials are non-synthetic and belts probably not reversible. Looks matter more. Tasteful tie patterns, ties not satin/very shiny for daytime, dress belts with dress shoes, the right proportions, etc.
Edited by mensimageconsultant - 6/14/13 at 2:23pm
post #40 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wojt View Post

others said about buying too much too early which is true, however do start buying some and and trying stuff out instead of just reading

like Thomas J. Watson said "If you want to succeed, double your failure rate" ;) My warderobe is so decimated I can afford few mistakes.

Because if something sucks real bad I can degrade it to home/uber_casual and still looks good enough by realworld standards.

I learned a lot from buying stuff that was short of ideal. Maybe though sticking to sales/outlet/thrift store is a good idea cause it's money :)

We won't get it right the first time, so accept failure along the way. I think as a fellow noobie this approach serves me well. I'm doing lots of reading&research in between, but honestly I wouldn't wanna wait few months/years(I think it would take me half a decade of extensive research to catch up with guys like NOBD :S ) before buying new clothes because I need improvement asap, goodluck!!!

+1

post #41 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by wojt View Post

others said about buying too much too early which is true, however do start buying some and and trying stuff out instead of just reading
like Thomas J. Watson said "If you want to succeed, double your failure rate" wink.gif My warderobe is so decimated I can afford few mistakes.
Because if something sucks real bad I can degrade it to home/uber_casual and still looks good enough by realworld standards.
I learned a lot from buying stuff that was short of ideal. Maybe though sticking to sales/outlet/thrift store is a good idea cause it's money smile.gif
We won't get it right the first time, so accept failure along the way. I think as a fellow noobie this approach serves me well. I'm doing lots of reading&research in between, but honestly I wouldn't wanna wait few months/years(I think it would take me half a decade of extensive research to catch up with guys like NOBD :S ) before buying new clothes because I need improvement asap, goodluck!!!

I appreciate where you're coming from and some experiments and failures are definitely part of building a good wardrobe over time, but there are a lot of things that are pretty easy to get right when you're just starting out. Once you understand what fits you, you really shouldn't be making major mistakes with staples such as dark suits, white and light blue dress shirts, navy blazers, etc. There really should not be any failures with this sort of thing in an ideal world. Once you have your basic wardrobe and start to branch out, one can and probably will make the occasional mistake. Until then, I don't think one has to have a massive amount of failures to succeed in building a wardrobe.

No need to learn for years before buying clothes, but even a couple of weeks can keep one from some of the more eggregious failures starting out. Other things like knowing what fits and sticking to basics before getting crazy works too. By the time you're ready to do something a bit out there, you'll have had that much more time to read and observe.
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by eluther View Post


What sort of prissy junior high do you go to? When (and it happens very rarely) people ask where I got something, I tell them honestly. I don't buy brands to tell people about them and I don't buy brands to not tell people about them. I buy things that fit me well and are well made.

If you want to act like this idea of "satisfaction" is such an important thing that you advise against buy multiples of anything (yes, I too understand the laws of marginal utility), shouldn't you understand the satisfaction of buying something well-made that you love and feel good in? Isn't that much more important than having to have some cheesy-ass line like, "I get my shirts at CT - they have great sales!"? If anything, admitting that you only buy your clothing because of the price interjects something that didn't previously exist into the conversation. They didn't ask you how much it cost. Why bring it up?

++1

post #43 of 44

This should answer your questions....You're welcomed wink.gif

 

SF_Noob_Lifecycle.jpg

post #44 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post


I appreciate where you're coming from and some experiments and failures are definitely part of building a good wardrobe over time, but there are a lot of things that are pretty easy to get right when you're just starting out. Once you understand what fits you, you really shouldn't be making major mistakes with staples such as dark suits, white and light blue dress shirts, navy blazers, etc. There really should not be any failures with this sort of thing in an ideal world. Once you have your basic wardrobe and start to branch out, one can and probably will make the occasional mistake. Until then, I don't think one has to have a massive amount of failures to succeed in building a wardrobe.
 

 

Depends on what do you consider massive, but yeah there are many mistakes to avoid easily like wearing too big clothes or a buying your first suit in black etc etc (personally I pride myself in never owning or wearing a black suit ;) ). You can avoid most mistakes, but you will make some and when you start it would be easier for you to just accept that. Like recently I bought a cardigan that's too deeply cut. Defo falls short of perfection but it fits well so I can still wear it and look good compared to 95% of casual wear you see on the streets (atleast that's what I hope lol).

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