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Store violated privacy policy

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Have any of you had a store violate their privacy policy? The men's clothing store Nick Hilton in Princeton had a Kentucky Derby promotion where you could pick a horse and win a gift certificate. The privacy policy at bottom of the email linked to their policy which included this:

"Will your information ever be shared, sold or rented?
We will never share, sell, or rent individual personal information without your advance permission, unless ordered by a court of law. Information submitted to us is only available to employees responsible for managing this data."

Today they sent a follow-up email to that promotion but didn't BCC it, so they basically just shared the names and emails of their entire client list. The email I used is public on my website so I'm not really that pissed, more just annoyed, but I imagine there are lots of others (and maybe some of you) on that list that wouldn't be happy about their email being shared. I responded instantly and some part-time staffer apologized and said she didn't know "the privacy policy or the steps to prevent such a mistake."

Has something like that ever happened to anyone else?
post #2 of 13
My response addresses anyone left on the planet who is unaware....
Privacy is yours to protect. The first person to violate your privacy is you.
Unfortunately we live in the electronic world. Never give personal information to anyone and expect it to remain private.
It is not a question of having something to hide. It is a question of your right to privacy.
Once you release private information, you are relying on the moral and ethical strength of character of the weaket individual in the chain of communication.
In other words, what you divuldge could be placed into the hands of an irresponsible person or persons. You have only yourself to thank or blame.
Trust no one online or offline unless you have been able to properly qualify them beforehand. It is that simple. The only thing you can do with unwanted emails is to filter them or create a new email account.
Filling out forms to win prizes or whatever it is, will probably result in that information leaking to some company who will use the information for marketing purposes. A good film to see is 'The Minority Report' and 'Nineteen Eighty-Four'. We live in this reality today.
post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

My response addresses anyone left on the planet who is unaware....
Privacy is yours to protect. The first person to violate your privacy is you.
Unfortunately we live in the electronic world. Never give personal information to anyone and expect it to remain private.
It is not a question of having something to hide. It is a question of your right to privacy.
Once you release private information, you are relying on the moral and ethical strength of character of the weaket individual in the chain of communication.
In other words, what you divuldge could be placed into the hands of an irresponsible person or persons. You have only yourself to thank or blame.
Trust no one online or offline unless you have been able to properly qualify them beforehand. It is that simple. The only thing you can do with unwanted emails is to filter them or create a new email account.
Filling out forms to win prizes or whatever it is, will probably result in that information leaking to some company who will use the information for marketing purposes. A good film to see is 'The Minority Report' and 'Nineteen Eighty-Four'. We live in this reality today.

MOL, this is certainly a time that I agree with you 100%. Fred G., I can understand your frustration, but you can't expect much less in all respect. Information will always be mistakenly released or passed on to third parties...to think otherwise is ignorance in its purest form. At least this time it was a public address, but always think twice about giving out information you wouldn't want seven billion people to have access.
post #4 of 13

The whole idea of "promotion for subscription" is that you subscribe to their mailing list and they give you a discount or some other boon now and maybe later. It's how these things work, nothing bad about it until they share it with other companies IMO.

Under each email there should be unsubscribe link that will automatically delete your email from the mailing list, if you bothered by their emails just click it. If you still get the messages email them so they remove your email 'manually'.

post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by wojt View Post

The whole idea of "promotion for subscription" is that you subscribe to their mailing list and they give you a discount or some other boon now and maybe later. It's how these things work, nothing bad about it until they share it with other companies IMO.
Under each email there should be unsubscribe link that will automatically delete your email from the mailing list, if you bothered by their emails just click it. If you still get the messages email them so they remove your email 'manually'.

Agree with this except don't click things within emails. Instead, mark it as junk/spam and let your filters do their thing. Clicking on links within emails, whether they're from known addresses or not, leads to disaster.
post #6 of 13

If you know the source you can click it, i unsubscribed from some newsletters already- seems better than filtering (though if you subscribe to companies 99,9% of the time they will have their name in the email so filter will work just as fine). Another way is having 2 email adresses, one for 'junk' i/e promotions that require subscribing and some shady websites your visiting and another formal email for contact with employers/friends

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by wojt View Post

If you know the source you can click it, i unsubscribed from some newsletters already- seems better than filtering (though if you subscribe to companies 99,9% of the time they will have their name in the email so filter will work just as fine). Another way is having 2 email adresses, one for 'junk' i/e promotions that require subscribing and some shady websites your visiting and another formal email for contact with employers/friends

The problem is that if a friend/trusted person's account is hacked (or from phishing scams), you'll receive an email and click the link. It's best to simply log in to your account at the third party, i.e. PayPal, and go from there (if it's a promotion). If it's a stupid video/news article/picture from a friend or relative, google it quickly. It's never advisable to click on a link within an email if you can go through independent channels to find the same thing. At the very least, you're aiding in the marketing research of a product. At the worst, you're sent to a scam site or downloading a virus.
post #8 of 13

That I agree with, you have to be careful especially with money. But what I am talking about are unsubscribe links, every respectable company has them in their newsletters, it's a norm. It's not a big deal to click those links, style forum has them too;

 

post #9 of 13

We are not talking about a normal newsletter here, if I read the OP right than his email address as well as every other person who signed up for this was in the TO: field. Which means every single person on the list now has his email address and knows what he participated in. This isn't a privacy policy violation so much as a huge cluster f*. I would describe a privacy policy violation to be something like selling your address to a marketing agency. This is more like pure stupidity.

 

I am sure there were employees from competitors on there who now have a clean list of emails which they can register for their newsletter.
 

post #10 of 13

I think you're right indeed,

hahaha can't help smiling they would do something like this, just visited their site and it looks like a throwback from 90s just with more pictures shog[1].gif so no wonder
not saying every store needs a proffesional looking website, but they shouldn't make mistakes like that with the emails - that's just amateurish

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoeluv View Post

We are not talking about a normal newsletter here, if I read the OP right than his email address as well as every other person who signed up for this was in the TO: field. Which means every single person on the list now has his email address and knows what he participated in. This isn't a privacy policy violation so much as a huge cluster f*. I would describe a privacy policy violation to be something like selling your address to a marketing agency. This is more like pure stupidity.

I am sure there were employees from competitors on there who now have a clean list of emails which they can register for their newsletter.

 

Yep, this is pretty much what happened. Since their privacy policy said they wouldn't give out personal information and now they sent my name and email to everyone that participated. I'd say they gave out personal information. Like I said, the email they gave out for me wasn't exactly private so I don't really care, and most of the emails on the list were yahoo or gmail addresses, but several people gave out their work address. Stupid. Their mailing list has had decent deals in the past and they've done stuff like $100 off any purchase over $300 (which I used for Aldens) but this seems really dumb. I was just wondering if anyone else has every had something like this happen, and if so did the company do anything to rectify it? I'm not going to report them, but I think there's a way they could be reported to the FTC or the state attorney general. Most states wouldn't care but some have made examples of small businesses violating privacy policies. I was just kind of floored that they would do this. They are basically the only high end men's store in Princeton that's not a chain (BB, RL, etc) so I imagine the average income of their mailing list is a bit higher than the median, and also full of people that would be kind of pissy if they knew their address was just broadcast to the whole list.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

Yep, this is pretty much what happened. Since their privacy policy said they wouldn't give out personal information and now they sent my name and email to everyone that participated. I'd say they gave out personal information. Like I said, the email they gave out for me wasn't exactly private so I don't really care, and most of the emails on the list were yahoo or gmail addresses, but several people gave out their work address. Stupid. Their mailing list has had decent deals in the past and they've done stuff like $100 off any purchase over $300 (which I used for Aldens) but this seems really dumb. I was just wondering if anyone else has every had something like this happen, and if so did the company do anything to rectify it? I'm not going to report them, but I think there's a way they could be reported to the FTC or the state attorney general. Most states wouldn't care but some have made examples of small businesses violating privacy policies. I was just kind of floored that they would do this. They are basically the only high end men's store in Princeton that's not a chain (BB, RL, etc) so I imagine the average income of their mailing list is a bit higher than the median, and also full of people that would be kind of pissy if they knew their address was just broadcast to the whole list.

You do seem pretty concerned for someone that says its not a big deal for you. I think from what your saying its probably not the most sophisticated organization, unlike a government agency (and even they have leaked/lost personal information by accident). Someone who works in a shop messed up. I suppose you could push this and get that person fired or perhaps even bury the store...if that's what you want to do.

What would you suggest the store do in this instance to make amends for what they did?
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

You do seem pretty concerned for someone that says its not a big deal for you. I think from what your saying its probably not the most sophisticated organization, unlike a government agency (and even they have leaked/lost personal information by accident). Someone who works in a shop messed up. I suppose you could push this and get that person fired or perhaps even bury the store...if that's what you want to do.

What would you suggest the store do in this instance to make amends for what they did?

My wife is a privacy attorney for a major publication so I'm just a little more attuned to it I suppose. I'm not pushing it further, just curious if anyone else had experienced anything like that before. They apologized, not really interested in anything else. Really sloppy for a business though.
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