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Spotted at Ferragamo

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

More than half the Tramezza shoes made of CG.

 

I know that ferragamo isn't nearly worth what they charge, and that the quality has declined. But this isn't even like church's using CG on one line of shoes. Tramezza is supposed to be like the upper crust—the only remaining line that is of any quality. To me it feels the same as if  C&J started using Cavalry Calf on 50% of their handgrades. 

 

Seems a bit absurd, no?

post #2 of 10
I momentarily liked Ferragamo, I have but 1 pair now. Their target clientele is clearly not me, I can't get past the current designs, let alone inspect the leathers.

Only model I like is the wholecut Carmelo, leather is butter soft on that model...
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Yeah I loved the Carmelo, the shape is wonderful. And I thought the leather was nice too. Unfortunately, that model, the ones I saw in blue and black, were CG. Its one of the few wholecuts I that Ive liked, but 1k for GC?

 

And yeah for a moment I also liked them. They had the air of a timeless elegance, but the horsebits and the sneaker like look of a lot of shoes turned me off. The Renzo—the previous iteration of the aforementioned shoe—was the one that caught my attention years ago. 

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by havingaraveup View Post

Yeah I loved the Carmelo, the shape is wonderful. And I thought the leather was nice too. Unfortunately, that model, the ones I saw in blue and black, were CG. Its one of the few wholecuts I that Ive liked, but 1k for GC?

And yeah for a moment I also liked them. They had the air of a timeless elegance, but the horsebits and the sneaker like look of a lot of shoes turned me off. The Renzo—the previous iteration of the aforementioned shoe—was the one that caught my attention years ago. 

the Renzo was a nice looking shoe

post #5 of 10

I have a pair I bought last year, beautiful shoes.

 

Do you have a source for this?

post #6 of 10
That's a disappointment, I have two pair of Tramezza from 08 or earlier, they were definitely not cg back then
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr monty View Post

the Renzo was a nice looking shoe

yup definitely like the renzo as well. I have no idea what my model was, bought on sample sale for 99... It's a single monk looked a lot like what EG for RLPL use to have.
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

I discovered the renzo while reading GQ my freshman year. I disregarded everything else but immediately started looking at nicer shoes. What I think attracted me also to Ferragamo was the fantastic art deco insole pattern. It felt very, La Dolce Vita to me. I'm disappointed that ferragamo has not lived up to my astronomical expectations and has not been everything I could want and more, and at the right price. How could they do that to me???

post #9 of 10

I'm not sure those are corrected grain.  I have been buying Tramezzas for over a dozen years.  They are my favorite shoes, because in standard "D" widths, they fit my reltively narrow (particularly narrow heeled) feet very well.  I also feel like the use of the leather "midsole" (vs. cork or cork paste commonly used) gives the shoe a bit more substantial feel.  I've also felt that whatever sole leather they use on the Tramezzas (with the odd exception of one pair I have) is at least at the same level as Edward Green and VASS (a definite step up from Alden, in my experience).

 

While lasts change over time, particularly in the toebox, to follow trends, I have, over the past several years, noticed other changes to the Tramezza line.  The last itself seems to have gotten slightly wider -- more than just the shape of the toe, but through the arch and instep -- which is kind of a bummer for me, but possibly better for others.  The shoes are almost all 360 degree welted now, whereas previously the heel was not welted (I wonder if this goes along with the slightly wider last).  The soles no longer have closed channels; the stitching is exposed (I've noticed this on recent Bally Scribes as well).  I'm also sort of bummed that they don't have the black cloth label in the inside anymore.

 

Also, the leather has changed, and appears shinier or waxier -- almost like corrected grain.  I do not believe it is corrected grain leather, though.  If you put just a couple of drops of water on the leather, it immediately soaks into the leather and makes dark spots.  I wonder whether Ferragamo has switched to using more of a "crust" type leather, which is then dyed and polished in-house, giving this look.  In person, the leather used on recent Tramezzas and St. Crispins I've seen in person appear very similar.  This new leather actually creases less, in my experience, than the leather previously used, but also scuffs easier.  Scuffs, however, are easy to polish out.  General finishing of the shoes appears about the same as in the past.  Better than Alden, not as good as Edward Green, with curious variations between models.

 

While I'm not a fan of some of the recent changes to the Tramezza line (least of all, the price increases), after some initial skepticism, I have to say I am a fan of the new leather.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Style Giraffe View Post

I'm not sure those are corrected grain.  I have been buying Tramezzas for over a dozen years.  They are my favorite shoes, because in standard "D" widths, they fit my reltively narrow (particularly narrow heeled) feet very well.  I also feel like the use of the leather "midsole" (vs. cork or cork paste commonly used) gives the shoe a bit more substantial feel.  I've also felt that whatever sole leather they use on the Tramezzas (with the odd exception of one pair I have) is at least at the same level as Edward Green and VASS (a definite step up from Alden, in my experience).

While lasts change over time, particularly in the toebox, to follow trends, I have, over the past several years, noticed other changes to the Tramezza line.  The last itself seems to have gotten slightly wider -- more than just the shape of the toe, but through the arch and instep -- which is kind of a bummer for me, but possibly better for others.  The shoes are almost all 360 degree welted now, whereas previously the heel was not welted (I wonder if this goes along with the slightly wider last).  The soles no longer have closed channels; the stitching is exposed (I've noticed this on recent Bally Scribes as well).  I'm also sort of bummed that they don't have the black cloth label in the inside anymore.

Also, the leather has changed, and appears shinier or waxier -- almost like corrected grain.  I do not believe it is corrected grain leather, though.  If you put just a couple of drops of water on the leather, it immediately soaks into the leather and makes dark spots.  I wonder whether Ferragamo has switched to using more of a "crust" type leather, which is then dyed and polished in-house, giving this look.  In person, the leather used on recent Tramezzas and St. Crispins I've seen in person appear very similar.  This new leather actually creases less, in my experience, than the leather previously used, but also scuffs easier.  Scuffs, however, are easy to polish out.  General finishing of the shoes appears about the same as in the past.  Better than Alden, not as good as Edward Green, with curious variations between models.

While I'm not a fan of some of the recent changes to the Tramezza line (least of all, the price increases), after some initial skepticism, I have to say I am a fan of the new leather.

Sounds like polished binder from Church?
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