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Random food thoughts - Street edition - Page 25

post #361 of 487

USA! USA! USA!

post #362 of 487

For real though, in celebration of the German win over Brazil, I feel like eating a bunch of Bratwurst.  Maybe some Brazilian barbeque to commisserate with the losers.

post #363 of 487
Maybe you can elaborate some more on why you think Cantonese is the best food in the world. Pretend its something by visvim.

I mean I think it is regarded as one of the strongest regions in China but besides preparation of seafood not sure why.
post #364 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abraxis View Post

Maybe you can elaborate some more on why you think Cantonese is the best food in the world. Pretend its something by visvim.

I mean I think it is regarded as one of the strongest regions in China but besides preparation of seafood not sure why.

lol at Visvim.  

 

I don't think that it's the "best food in the world".  I mean, that is sort of a fun argument, but it's really a non-starter.  I mean, do you compare cusines nationally, or regionally, by population centers, etc... just doing that type of categorization would take us into the abyss.

 

That said, the preparation of seafood is huge,  I think that that alone gives it a huge headstart on the rest of China, and cannot be discounted.  Otherwise, the cooking techniques are the most advanced and varied of the different regions in China, and most of the techniques that are elsewhere are also found in Cantonese cooking, preponderance of the wok notwithstanding, there are an abundance of fresh and varied ingredients, seafood and produce, especially, and in Hong Kong, there was a great deal of outside influence, which often makes for great inspiration.  And unlike some other countries, the Cantonese have had access to the best cuts of meat, but instead of just focusing on those, they use those *and* everything else.  It is a really large, prosperous, populous, region, in a country where social events are generally based around food.  Hardly a surprise that it would have a really well developed cuisine.

 

I've been all over China, and I really don't think that any other regional cuisine really competes in the same league.  There are good things everywhere, mind you, but the focus is much more narrow.

post #365 of 487
Agreed the "best" is a nebulous concept, but clearly there are reasons internally that make it make sense for you to make the claim even if jokingly. It's always interesting to hear what those are, especially when my opinion is the diametric opposite.

It's interesting to me to understand why people like things especially when I don't get it myself. Rarely, after the explanation I get it and then it's a win because I'm always looking for new things to appreciate.

Your point about ingredients and culture surrounding them makes sense. I think that's why California has an advantage. Yeah fundamentally I don't like Cantonese food since I dislike seafood and gristly weird animal bits/offal but I can understand the focus on quality and the benefits of being a large prosperous region with a focus on food.

Sichuan is my region for sure followed by probably Xi'an then Taiwanese food. I love numbling spice (ma la). I love how accessible dishes like spicy cold noodles are and mapo tofu. I pick up spicy cold noodles for parties a lot as a side dish and everyone is a fan even people who dislike spice, asian food or find the concept of cold noodles strange. Everyone is a fan.

I love Xi'an's noodle history and their other dishes are not shabby either. Taiwan... bunch of hodge podge of awesome stuff and they did a lot better job executing Chinese food than the places I visited when I was in China in the past... the quality of ingredients, health standards and quality control clearly impacted the quality of food I experienced. I'm sure its very different than when I went and even back then you can find places with great food... Shanghai was awesome even then (15 years ago).
post #366 of 487

I love noodles, hot and cold.  And I really like Shanghai's native cuisine (I mean, obviously modern Shanghai has every kind of Chinese food and more).  Actually, could go to a Shanghai-nese noodle and dumpling house right now.  

post #367 of 487

I really like Xi'an food, too. There's a Uygyr restaurant in Melbourne that is absolutely great - it's like a weird combination of Turkish and Chinese. The noodles (fat, handrolled, chewey, thick as fuck) are glorious, and the spice is fucking ace. Lamb on a skewer is so hard to pass up/beat, too. Lots of cumin, lots of chilli, right amount of fat dripping off - hell YES. There's also weird bread/pastry combinations that aren't in other regions of China I'm familiar with.

 

Sichuan I've found a bit hit and miss. Some dishes I've really enjoyed (Sichuan hot pot was great!!!!!!!), others I've not had great luck with (beef covered in chilli, literally flakes of chilli all over a slice of beef, was just too much). That being said, it's incredibly hard to find here - most of what I've had was in the mainland, but I'd love to try a lot more. The numbing really is unique and interesting.

 

Taiwanese food I found a tended towards being sweeter than expected overall (especially with seafood), but there were some truly, truly excellent dishes that I had there - fragrant pork rice, dumplings, and a whole bunch of stuff I can't remember the name of, only the taste. And, of course, bubble tea. Lots of noodle soup in Taiwan - I wish I could remember the names of what I ate.

 

I quite like Shanghai food - which, if I'm not mistaken, is quite abundant in Melbourne where I grew up. Noodles that are a bit oily, but so flavoursome. Xiao Long Bao, etc, etc, etc. It's probably what I think of when I think of Chinese food.

 

But really, best asian = Malaysian. Why choose cuisines when you can have all of them at once?

 

I'm visiting Turkey at the end of the year and am really looking forward to getting involved in that cuisine. I love gozleme, sujuck, borek, kebab and Turkish bread/bagel, so I'm hoping to keep discovering some cool things.

 

 

Today I tried making tea for the first time. It didn't go well. I used way too many loose leaves and it just tastes stupidly strong and bitter.

post #368 of 487

Taiwan's most beloved restaurant:

 

post #369 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

I really like Xi'an food, too. There's a Uygyr restaurant in Melbourne that is absolutely great - it's like a weird combination of Turkish and Chinese. The noodles (fat, handrolled, chewey, thick as fuck) are glorious, and the spice is fucking ace. Lamb on a skewer is so hard to pass up/beat, too. Lots of cumin, lots of chilli, right amount of fat dripping off - hell YES. There's also weird bread/pastry combinations that aren't in other regions of China I'm familiar with.

Sichuan I've found a bit hit and miss. Some dishes I've really enjoyed (Sichuan hot pot was great!!!!!!!), others I've not had great luck with (beef covered in chilli, literally flakes of chilli all over a slice of beef, was just too much). That being said, it's incredibly hard to find here - most of what I've had was in the mainland, but I'd love to try a lot more. The numbing really is unique and interesting.

Taiwanese food I found a tended towards being sweeter than expected overall (especially with seafood), but there were some truly, truly excellent dishes that I had there - fragrant pork rice, dumplings, and a whole bunch of stuff I can't remember the name of, only the taste. And, of course, bubble tea. Lots of noodle soup in Taiwan - I wish I could remember the names of what I ate.

I quite like Shanghai food - which, if I'm not mistaken, is quite abundant in Melbourne where I grew up. Noodles that are a bit oily, but so flavoursome. Xiao Long Bao, etc, etc, etc. It's probably what I think of when I think of Chinese food.

But really, best asian = Malaysian. Why choose cuisines when you can have all of them at once?

I'm visiting Turkey at the end of the year and am really looking forward to getting involved in that cuisine. I love gozleme, sujuck, borek, kebab and Turkish bread/bagel, so I'm hoping to keep discovering some cool things.


Today I tried making tea for the first time. It didn't go well. I used way too many loose leaves and it just tastes stupidly strong and bitter.

More tea relative to water amount should cause under extraction not over extraction. Try brewing at cooler temperatures or for less time to get it less bitter.
post #370 of 487
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

I love noodles, hot and cold.  And I really like Shanghai's native cuisine (I mean, obviously modern Shanghai has every kind of Chinese food and more).  Actually, could go to a Shanghai-nese noodle and dumpling house right now.  

every week I try to make noodles at least once, starting broth from scratch. always takes forever but the end product is something that I enjoy and eat for days




from a few weeks ago, cruddy photo but whatever

dashi base with gochujang, simmered with oxtail, charred ginger and onion, a good amount of korean pepper, chinese fermented bean paste. super savory and full bodied with the right amount of spiciness. topped with green onions, kimchi, messed up soft boiled eggs (fuck electric ranges), enoki mushrooms. had to use udon noodles because I couldn't find acceptable ramen noodles (Sun brand where are you)

last week made wonton noodle soup, before that made crunchy stone pot bibimbap rice vermicelli. I want to try my hand at ramen but until I find a good brand of noodles to use I don't even wanna take the effort to do so. Probs gonna start doing my rounds of Vietnamese noodles now that I'm low on Korean ingredients so maybe I will post pics and recipes of that
post #371 of 487

That looks really good.  I would like to make my own noodles, but making pastry (as opposed to cooking) drives me crazy.  My wife is a really good baker and generally good at making things like noodles though.  Maybe I'll see if she'll "help" me.

post #372 of 487

G trans, if I crowd fund you a plane ticket here will you cook for me?

 

LA Guy - I make a lot of my own pasta and pastry - it used to drive me nuts until I got shown a few tips, and learned a few tricks. I always make it by hand (mixing by hand), because I find it's much easier to ensure proper consistency, etc. I always re-fridgerate - this is perhaps the best thing I've picked up - makes it so much easier to roll, mould and manipulate.

 

For pasta 1.5 eggs for each cup of flour (and 1 cup of flour for each person) - when in doubt more egg.  Add a bit of salt and olive oil until the mixture is like breadcrumbs, then about a tablespoon of water at a time until it's soft, moist, but not sticky. Knead adding flour, water or oil as necessary (I prefer to make it a bit wet, then knead in flour as I go).


Edited by LonerMatt - 7/9/14 at 12:07am
post #373 of 487
hah, I've dreamed of owning a noodle shop way into the future. maybe like a Vietnamese noodle place: pho, bun, mi. Every month do a different pop-up menu too featuring noodles from different parts of Asia. Possibilities are endless! Just think, your favorite pho place also serves a rotating menu of amazing Asian noodles too? At least, that's the place I wish existed because I would live there shog[1].gif

Two things have really upped my broth game for my noodles: using a dashi base for almost everything and heavily charring things like ginger and onion for long simmering. The dashi influence of course comes from Japan, but starting off with at least sea kelp (sometimes I don't use bonito flakes because it gets expensive) always adds a good balance to meaty broths. Plus, you can use every part of your ingredients. The base of my pork/shrimp wonton broth started off with sea kelp and shrimp heads and shells to even out the porkiness of my pork trotter broth. The charring thing I learned from cooking Viet noodles...makes the ginger and onion flavor so much better
post #374 of 487
The charring thing is actually a french thing the viet took to heart
post #375 of 487
A lot of ramen places will do that/used fried onions and garlic too right? For shio ramen type broths. I have a ban xeo craving now.
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