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Dining/side chairs - Page 7

post #91 of 110
I didn't say they had a marketing problem.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

Carl Hansen the danish manufacture who makes most of Wegner's designs, almost went bankroupt a couple years back, even though some of their designs had a 12 month lead time, why you ask because they were to slow, only a few of their designs were bread makers and a complete lack of marketing (they didn't have a marketing dept. or a partner until 3-4 years ago).

Most of their products don't sell like CH07, CH24, so having a backlog on the few products that do sell, isn't the best business plan in the world.
post #92 of 110
It still reads like you're saying they had a marketing problem, but maybe I'm not reading you right.

Anyways, all you've done is get right back to my key point, which is that the manufacturing backlogs are ludicrous. We have speculated on the reasons: lack of competition, planned scarcity, arrogance, structural economic/regulatory conditions that impact investment, poorly-designed IP regimes. I don't know that I have enough information to draw any rock-solid conclusions, but it does seem that we have some kind of a problem. High-margin manufacturing (in your example you cite a 50% gross margin, which is fairly healthy) protected by an IP-granted "monopoly" on that design that still manages to bungle things. Consumers literally can't get the design they want on account of the backlogs, they have nowhere else to get it, the designer can't get paid because fulfillment is not happening, and the current state of affairs somehow fails to produce new designs. Nobody wins.

So, blame China.
post #93 of 110
Someone must be earning some consulting fees, because these guys have all improved pretty dramatically in terms of customer appreciation in the past couple years.

Also, long lead times are often due to the retailers stocking warehouses, so the end customer can usually acquire their most famous designs quickly.

Louis Poulsen lighting for instance, I've made a few orders with them and have received everything from a warehouse in the US within 2 weeks.
post #94 of 110
I don't know if a complete lack of is a problem, that is in the eyes of the beholder, lack of consumer product knowledge is a definite problem and so was the main problem lack of cash-flow.

The carpenters who builds the chair maybe makes 5-6k a month, so a quick calculation will tell you how many chairs, at how much they need to cover each worker.

Wegner is dead, so I doubt he cares when he gets paid, his designs are copyrighted and I hear weekly about people who are inspired by him.

The winners are owners of vintage pieces, auction prices at the moments are ridiculous.

High street clothing mark ups are in the 500-1000% range and that's a highly competitive market, so basing mark ups on supply and demand, may not be the whole story.
post #95 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Someone must be earning some consulting fees, because these guys have all improved pretty dramatically in terms of customer appreciation in the past couple years.

Also, long lead times are often due to the retailers stocking warehouses, so the end customer can usually acquire their most famous designs quickly.

They have they bought an old carpentry shop, so they could expand production, hired pr/marketing people and even opened a Flagship shop in Copenhagen a couple months back.

The problem was from what I have been told, due to the japanese market carpet bombing them with orders.
post #96 of 110
To me, this is the most elegant and comfortable modern chair. I love these when covered in suede.


Brno chair


post #97 of 110
Thread Starter 
i've come to not like cantilever bases for use at my table. I think it's because the table is not particularly big, and those bases inevitably take up a lot of room.
post #98 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

i've come to not like cantilever bases for use at my table. I think it's because the table is not particularly big, and those bases inevitably take up a lot of room.

I like how the cantilever acts as a shock absorber, offering a gentle amount of give. Nice during long dinner parties.
post #99 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

They have they bought an old carpentry shop, so they could expand production, hired pr/marketing people and even opened a Flagship shop in Copenhagen a couple months back.

The problem was from what I have been told, due to the japanese market carpet bombing them with orders.

They're producing the mogens koch bookcase now as well as a few other pieces from that shop (rasmussen?) I think it's an awesome bookcase. From what I've heard the japanese are absolutely obsessed with danish furniture. It helps that their culture seems to also very much appreciate authenticity.

PSG, I'm certainly with you on the Brno chair, it's a great piece.
post #100 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Oh, maybe the most perfect dining chair ever made:



I know you don't want to go the MCM route, but come on, this is painfully beautiful. Pricey.

These are very comfortable chairs and easy to move around. They were my first kitchen chairs and I enjoyed them for years. There used to be high quality copies available and in natural maple wood frames with chrome.
post #101 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

They're producing the mogens koch bookcase now as well as a few other pieces from that shop (rasmussen?) I think it's an awesome bookcase. From what I've heard the japanese are absolutely obsessed with danish furniture. It helps that their culture seems to also very much appreciate authenticity.

PSG, I'm certainly with you on the Brno chair, it's a great piece.

Rud Rasmussen a friend of mine did his apprenticeship there, he had to be an errainboy for 2 years before they let him become an apprentice.

They are and i think they are the second or third most common tourists in Denmark.
post #102 of 110
Interesting, the work I've seen from Rasmussen has all been pretty awesome.
post #103 of 110
My furniture guy whose high-end lines consist of Knoll, Cassina, and Georgetti says that he makes far less money (40% markup) on his high-end stuff than the low-end stuff he sells to people who blanch at $1k/foot couches. The lead times to America from Italy are apparently dominated entirely by getting enough stuff to fill a shipping container. You basically wait until there's enough stuff coming from Italy to make the trip worthwhile.

The low-end stuff ironically is made in LA, and is ugly as sin.

In case you think this is different for high-tech manufacturing, it's not. Unless you are Apple or some other high volume manufacturer who orders the entire output of a factory, you have to wait for a shipping container from China to fill before it will ship too. We had a fan we needed for a device we design and manufacture, and had to wait something like 18 weeks to get it because of the shipping issue.
post #104 of 110
here's a crazy one. this popped up on a search for wegner chairs. the price is, literally, unbelievable. but it was advertised on amazon. and though they say it's a repro, they use wegner and hansen's names. how do they do this?
post #105 of 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodguy View Post

here's a crazy one. this popped up on a search for wegner chairs. the price is, literally, unbelievable. but it was advertised on amazon. and though they say it's a repro, they use wegner and hansen's names. how do they do this?

Not sure about using the Hansen name, but the rest of it is just a statement of fact: Wegner designed the wishbone chair.

I don't think there are any legal protections left on that chair in america. Wegner is the guy's name and I don't know that it is trade marked.
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