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Cuff Link Damage - Page 73

post #1081 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

Do have a question though -- I should learn to appreciate that because this is hand engraved, the engraving on one is slightly dissimilar to the other, correct?

They look great. Enjoy them and be especially thankful that they're not perfect, digitally-engraved bores.

I think it was Neil Young who said that analog is like being hit in the face with an ocean spray -- where with digital you're hit with millions of tiny ice cubes, all exactly the same.
post #1082 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by davesmith View Post

I was just about to ask where you got these done as I was thinking of getting a pair of cufflinks engraved and had no idea where to go. At that price, I'll keep looking!!

Yes, it is not cheap, but neither are most places in central London, unfortunately. There might have been cheaper options but I didn't want to risk it given that the cufflinks are not exactly inexpensive as well. Don't forget this is hand-engraved so A) they had to come up with the 'art-work' and B) They had to hand-engrave it in an identical manner on both cufflinks!

The last I recall, machine engraving was like 20-25 pounds for 3 letters.
post #1083 of 1136

I bought these off of ebay a few days ago.

They're supposed to be chinese antique but I have no clue whether that's true. 

post #1084 of 1136

I'm not an expert on Chinese antiques, but does that depict a ski lift?

post #1085 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang View Post

I'm not an expert on Chinese antiques, but does that depict a ski lift?

I've been trying to figure out what that bit is.  I don't think it would be a ski lift considering the butterflies on the other part but who knows?  I wish I could date them but regardless, I love their look and as it got them for less than $15 I'm not expecting them to be valuable.

 

Thanks for offering a new possibility on what that is.  I was thinking it might be a bridge.

post #1086 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcox68 View Post

I bought these off of ebay a few days ago. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

They're supposed to be chinese antique but I have no clue whether that's true. 
That's a technique called damascene and it is usually Japanese or Spanish in origin.

Here's a pair similar to yours:

http://www.rubylane.com/item/560593-001428/Vintage-Japanese-Damascene-Cufflinks

And here is a more intricate example:

http://verabattemarco.com/japan-damascene-zougan-cufflinks-finely-detailed.html
post #1087 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlaneurNYC View Post


That's a technique called damascene and it is usually Japanese or Spanish in origin.

Here's a pair similar to yours:

http://www.rubylane.com/item/560593-001428/Vintage-Japanese-Damascene-Cufflinks

And here is a more intricate example:

http://verabattemarco.com/japan-damascene-zougan-cufflinks-finely-detailed.html

Thanks for the info and the links.  I had thought my cufflinks looked Japanese but I don't even know enough to be dangerous when it comes to jewelry or Asian arts.  I wonder if there's any way of figuring out when they were made.

post #1088 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcox68 View Post

Thanks for the info and the links.  I had thought my cufflinks looked Japanese but I don't even know enough to be dangerous when it comes to jewelry or Asian arts.  I wonder if there's any way of figuring out when they were made.

Are they marked anywhere? The only way to date them properly would be if they were marked on the back. Cuff links like this have been made at least since the early 20th century.

The fact that yours are double-sided and not toggle-back is good. They were probably made for the tourist trade mid-century. And I pretty sure that is Mt Fuji with a house in the foreground. The etched lines probably represent rice paddies or something.
post #1089 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlaneurNYC View Post


Are they marked anywhere? The only way to date them properly would be if they were marked on the back. Cuff links like this have been made at least since the early 20th century.

The fact that yours are double-sided and not toggle-back is good. They were probably made for the tourist trade mid-century. And I pretty sure that is Mt Fuji with a house in the foreground. The etched lines probably represent rice paddies or something.

That all makes sense, thanks.  There are no markings at all so I'll never know they're date but it helps to know the possible timeframe.  Regardless, they're my favorite pair right now.

 

This forum has been much more useful then I imagined it could be thanks to people like yourself, Kent and others.  I'll make sure to post other acquisitions here in future.

post #1090 of 1136

I think the lines depict a Japanese temple gate, a torii.

 

 

 

What is damascene? I'm aware of the technique for swords, knives, and other blades but this looks nothing like it.

post #1091 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang View Post

I think the lines depict a Japanese temple gate, a torii.

 

 

 

That's very possible.  There's definitely a similarity.

 

Also, sorry to both of you that my responses are coming so slowly.  I haven't gotten over the newbie period so my posts are all being moderated.  Does anyone know when that ends?

post #1092 of 1136
Good call on the torii.

It's a bit of a catchall meaning that metal is decorated by inserting contrasting metals -- most often silver and gold -- into its surface. I guess it also means the act of decorating metal with wavy patterns, which could be inlaid or etched.

I found this:
Quote:
Pattern welding or Damascening, the traditional method for making decorative patterns on forged products, originated some hundred years before Christ. Early examples from the Orient show patterns resultant from the metallurgical processes used at ancient time. Later, melting and forging were developed so that skillful forge masters of around 500 AD could make the most artistic products by pattern welding.

Such damascene-forged swords or knives dominated the weapon industry from the Iron age to the Viking age. The possibilities of combining a hard edged material with a tough backing material were used. The magical image of the patterns made the owner feel invincible.

Steel pieces of at least two different compositions (Carbon or Phosphorous), were welded together and then kneaded by forging, producing a laminated material of about 100 layers. The patterns were made visible by etching the metal surface. Old swords and knives from the Viking or Anglo-Saxon periods often show magnificent patterns.

The name "Damascus" is attributed by some scholars to Damaskos, son of Hermes, who is said to have lived in this area and given it his name. Others attribute the name to the myth of Askos or that of Damas, who accompanied Dionysias, and offered him a skene (skin) thus the name "Damaskene". While others believe that the origin of the name came from Damakina, the wife of the god of water. Linguistically analysed, some feel that the name "Damascus" was derived from "The Water Land."

http://www.clockguy.com/SiteRelated/SiteReferencePages/DamasceningHistory.html

How the term came to also cover cuff links and brooches, IDK
post #1093 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcox68 View Post

I bought these off of ebay a few days ago.


They're supposed to be chinese antique but I have no clue whether that's true. 

A little bit of art history would help here too. People already pointed out that is a torii.

You can also tell the mountaintop is japanese in origin. That's how ancient japanese art depicts Mt. Fuji like what you see in many of ukiyoe art (look up Hokusai). Ancient chinese art captures mountains much different. They aren't peaked in such a shape or with snow on top. The one shown is almost always attributed to Mt. Fuji.

That's not to say that maybe the cufflinks aren't old and chinese made. Maybe it actually was made in China long ago or maybe even the seller didn't know much about what he had at all, but the art is very much Japanese in origin.
post #1094 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geruvah View Post


A little bit of art history would help here too. People already pointed out that is a torii.

You can also tell the mountaintop is japanese in origin. That's how ancient japanese art depicts Mt. Fuji like what you see in many of ukiyoe art (look up Hokusai). Ancient chinese art captures mountains much different. They aren't peaked in such a shape or with snow on top. The one shown is almost always attributed to Mt. Fuji.

That's not to say that maybe the cufflinks aren't old and chinese made. Maybe it actually was made in China long ago or maybe even the seller didn't know much about what he had at all, but the art is very much Japanese in origin.

Thanks for the info.  Based on the links FlaneurNYC posted I'm pretty sure they're Japanese and the seller didn't know what he had.  There are no markings so its probably impossible to ever really verify but I appreciate all the interest and the help.

post #1095 of 1136

I like em

Quote:
Originally Posted by kcox68 View Post

I bought these off of ebay a few days ago.

They're supposed to be chinese antique but I have no clue whether that's true. 

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