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adventures in bespoke: Richard Anderson - Page 7

post #91 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

I think your just being argumentative,
lol. since I've talked to him about 100 times in my life and actually gotten stuff made by him, i guess i have no idea what I'm talkinga about.

for those who miss the "good old days" of the MC/CM forum, they were often a lot like this
post #92 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

lol. since I've talked to him about 100 times in my life and actually gotten stuff made by him, i guess i have no idea what I'm talkinga about.

for those who miss the "good old days" of the MC/CM forum, they were often a lot like this

You should be a fly on the wall at the CTDA events. You'd get to hear what we all really think.

Look I can't speak for Len but if someone asked me to copy or imitate someone else's work I'd tell them just to go to that original source. If they then said I live in New York but I want a Richard Anderson I'd say go fly out and see him, I can make you a David Reeves suit but I'm not Richard Anderson so I won't make you one of his suits.
Edited by David Reeves - 6/11/13 at 8:51am
post #93 of 149
you know, i sort of doubt that len talks shit about his customers behind their back, in any case, in person, he is always gracious.

so, the point is, if you want a strong shouldered, lean, structured bespoke suit in NY, he is a great choice.
post #94 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

you know, i sort of doubt that len talks shit about his customers behind their back, in any case, in person, he is always gracious.

so, the point is, if you want a strong shouldered, lean, structured bespoke suit in NY, he is a great choice.

That's not what I was implying. I think how we (I mean humans) deal with and act in front of clients is very different to how we are in front of our friends, family, peers etc. surely that's understandable yes?
post #95 of 149
No one is saying "copy." It's rather, what general style do you cut? If you ask him for A&S, he will flatly say "no, that's not my style. And in fact can't stand it." If you say, "I am interested in more of a Huntsman style," you will be closer to the mark. You are not going to get Huntsman, exactly, but it will be much close to that than to A&S (or to anything italian, for that matter).
post #96 of 149
Looking at Medtech's fitting, and knowing how Logsdail's coats are made, I am having a hard time understanding why Len isn't a good choice for something very similar in NY. If you showed him those photos and asked how he would cut it differently, his answer would likely be "not very different." Why is this so controversial?
post #97 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

No one is saying "copy." It's rather, what general style do you cut? If you ask him for A&S, he will flatly say "no, that's not my style. And in fact can't stand it." If you say, "I am interested in more of a Huntsman style," you will be closer to the mark. You are not going to get Huntsman, exactly, but it will be much close to that than to A&S (or to anything italian, for that matter).

This is what I was responding to:


"Is there anyone in NYC who regularly and reliably imitates their cut?"

That's very different from what you are talking about which is how we talk about things every day to clients.

How many times do we hear things on here like "can Chan make me a suit like Tom Ford?" That is not the way in my opinion (and it's an informed opinion lets be fair) that people should approach working with tailors. It's one of those things that just annoys me. Anyway I've made clear what I'm talking about I'm not going to argue with you about it.

You anywhere near union square? Come round and have a chat, look at some pieces sometime.
post #98 of 149
Well, some tailors DO imitate. E.g,, Richard Anderson himself says that his cut is purist Huntsman. There are several A&S "expats" who claim to be more religiously devoted to the "old" A&S cut than the mothership itself is. The late Brian Russell was said to be "more A&S than A&S."

Len has no specific allegiance to a specific SR house. But, as Flusser wrote a long time ago, SR has two poles, Huntsman and A&S, with Poole more or less in the middle. The majority of SR firms are far closer/similar to Huntsman than to A&S. Len was trained in that tradition too, moreover, it's what he prefers. So, I suppose if a customer can tell the nuanced differences between Logsdail and Huntsman (which would be evident only to a conoseiur with an extremely well trained eye) and prefers the latter, then he should only buy from them. However, if he simply prefers that approach to A&S (which is far more obvious to the untrained eye) then he might well be very happy with Len. Especially if he prefers a local option, which has a lot of advantages.
post #99 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Well, some tailors DO imitate. E.g,, Richard Anderson himself says that his cut is purist Huntsman. There are several A&S "expats" who claim to be more religiously devoted to the "old" A&S cut than the mothership itself is. The late Brian Russell was said to be "more A&S than A&S."

Len has no specific allegiance to a specific SR house. But, as Flusser wrote a long time ago, SR has two poles, Huntsman and A&S, with Poole more or less in the middle. The majority of SR firms are far closer/similar to Huntsman than to A&S. Len was trained in that tradition too, moreover, it's what he prefers. So, I suppose if a customer can tell the nuanced differences between Logsdail and Huntsman (which would be evident only to a conoseiur with an extremely well trained eye) and prefers the latter, then he should only buy from them. However, if he simply prefers that approach to A&S (which is far more obvious to the untrained eye) then he might well be very happy with Len. Especially if he prefers a local option, which has a lot of advantages.

Aside from Len, are myself and Rory Duffy the only permanently based in New York makers with actual Savile Row flight time? I haven't asked him but what firm was Len with?
post #100 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

Aside from Len, are myself and Rory Duffy the only permanently based in New York makers with actual Savile Row flight time? I haven't asked him but what firm was Len with?
Also, Cheo, I think. A&S in style and perhaps training - I recall Bruce Boyer was a fan.
post #101 of 149
I don't remember where he trained, but he had his own firm called Burstow & Logsdail and then moved here permanently in the early '90s. He used to cut here and send all the stuff to England to be sewn. I think he may still do that with some but he also employs his own coatmakers too. And the firm is now just called "Leonard Logsdail," not sure when he separated from Burstow, but it was after he moved here. Brian Burstow died around 10 years ago, perhaps he changed the name then or maybe they separated before, I don't know.
post #102 of 149
Cheo did less than a year on the Row. Which is something but he is originally from Korea.
post #103 of 149
Len told me a long time ago that he trained at either Welsh & Jefferies or Bernard Weatherill. Something with a "W" - can't quite remember which one.
post #104 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post

Len told me a long time ago that he trained at either Welsh & Jefferies or Bernard Weatherill. Something with a "W" - can't quite remember which one.
I believe your memory is better than you think. He worked at both.
post #105 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post


I believe your memory is better than you think. He worked at both.

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