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adventures in bespoke: Richard Anderson - Page 5

post #61 of 149
On a cultural note: Orderliness, discipline, rigidity, and a systematic approach to dealing with stuff (outside of tailoring) are also very much part of the English culture. School syllabi, the use of corporal punishment in schools, draconian and antiquated laws are all examples of this obsession with systematism and orderliness.

One can only imagine the experience of being measured by a Swiss or German tailor.
Gemultlichkeit notwwithstanding.
post #62 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

On a cultural note: Orderliness, discipline, rigidity, and a systematic approach to dealing with stuff (outside of tailoring) are also very much part of the English culture. School syllabi, the use of corporal punishment in schools, draconian and antiquated laws are all examples of this obsession with systematism and orderliness.

One can only imagine the experience of being measured by a Swiss or German tailor.
Gemultlichkeit notwwithstanding.

Oh, but you're probably right.

There's this US-based tailor (an engineer by trade whom I believe studied in Germany) professing that he can achieve near perfection without fitting by cutting according to his 'science of cutting'. He says that he can 'draft a pattern 0.5cm exact around a body ...'

http://www.berlinbespokesuits.com/

I cannot vouch for the veracity.

Pictures of a suit he made sans fittings:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


post #63 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

On a cultural note: Orderliness, discipline, rigidity, and a systematic approach to dealing with stuff (outside of tailoring) are also very much part of the English culture. School syllabi, the use of corporal punishment in schools, draconian and antiquated laws are all examples of this obsession with systematism and orderliness.

One can only imagine the experience of being measured by a Swiss or German tailor.
Gemultlichkeit notwwithstanding.

I don't believe that's true of the British, maybe in a dickens novel or downton abbey. We don't have corporal punishment in schools and I don't see what laws we have that are draconian certainly not compared to any other country.

I think élan and verve are of far more desirability than rigidity in all things especially tailoring. Thing is anyone can learn rules but true brilliance rarely comes from them.
post #64 of 149
^ Off topic response to the above, so don't read if you're not interested.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Growing up, I had corporal punishment in schools.Things might be different now. Every thing, including syllabi were (are) systematized, uniforms are worn, school rules are recited etc. In the UK, I feel that schools still adopt a very paternalistic stance, in stark contrast with schools in the US. Even in university, there's a clear sense of hierarchy, unlike in the US where I felt students were treated as equals (obviously, not intellectual equals). Some schools still choose to preserve their archaic ways like wearing academic gowns to exams etc. The celebration of British pagentry, to the idea of a monarchy (symbolic as it may be) in this epoch are what some might feel are examples of an attempt to adhere to customs that are disconnected from the modern day. This difference is thrown into sharp relief when one adopts a comparative perspective, notably in a comparison to the US, or Naples.

Laws (like strict liability ones) are massively in need of an overhaul.

Edit: Brilliant, there's a thread on uniform and some ex-students document how rigid school life, to take one example, was (is) like in the UK -- http://www.styleforum.net/t/340386/school-dress-codes-have-they-influenced-how-you-dress

You're right, though, that rigid tailoring, is bad tailoring.

Edited by bboysdontcryy - 5/29/13 at 10:22am
post #65 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

^ Off topic response to the above, so don't read if you're not interested.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Growing up, I had corporal punishment in schools.Things might be different now. Every thing, including syllabi were (are) systematized, uniforms are worn, school rules are recited etc. In the UK, I feel that schools still adopt a very paternalistic stance, in stark contrast with schools in the US. Even in university, there's a clear sense of hierarchy, unlike in the US where I felt students were treated as equals (obviously, not intellectual equals). Some schools still choose to preserve their archaic ways like wearing academic gowns to exams etc. The celebration of British pagentry, to the idea of a monarchy (symbolic as it may be) in this epoch are what some might feel are examples of an attempt to adhere to customs that are disconnected from the modern day. This difference is thrown into sharp relief when one adopts a comparative perspective, notably in a comparison to the US, or Naples.

Laws (like strict liability ones) are massively in need of an overhaul.

Edit: Brilliant, there's a thread on uniform and some ex-students document how rigid school life, to take one example, was (is) like in the UK -- http://www.styleforum.net/t/340386/school-dress-codes-have-they-influenced-how-you-dress

You're right, though, that rigid tailoring, is bad tailoring.

Public school?
post #66 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnnamedPlayer View Post

Jacket is far too tight in the back and too tight in the front.

Yeah, and there are tons of white marks on it. Looks terrible.
post #67 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

Public school?

I come from English Public School and aggressive shouting is not uncommon. However, I have never heard physical force actually been used, maybe for the Rugby 1st squad.

I know this because I always get shout at in school. I was a naughty boy back then.

I believe bboysdontcryy comes from a very good school for his O level or A level, no matter it is a state or public school.
Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post

Yeah, and there are tons of white marks on it. Looks terrible.

Better than no chalk and no 'correction'
post #68 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

Better than no chalk and no 'correction'

Sarcasm...
post #69 of 149

Richard Anderson has always reminded me of Hugh Grant.

post #70 of 149
Would love to see more RA bespoke.
post #71 of 149
Thread Starter 
Forward fitting today, and I'm really pleased with how everything is coming together. The vest is already spot-on, and the trousers require only minor adjustments as the pleats were slightly pulling open. My slightly drooping right shoulder necessitates some clean-up of the waist, and Richard will give me a bit more room across the upper back. Otherwise, the coat feels great.







post #72 of 149
The turn around is quite fast.
post #73 of 149
Thread Starter 
Fittings apparently can be done in 2 week intervals, so this would progress even more quickly if I were local.
post #74 of 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

The turn around is quite fast.

I was talking to George Glasgow who was saying that Richard runs contrary to the Savile row idea of making clients wait. The SR idea in long lead times is to help balance cash flow and theoretically your supposed to encourage bulk orders or have people order things on a rolling basis ie at fittings. These days people are scared to death of doing things like that until they see finished garments so fast turnaround is pretty good because you may be able to deliver and therefore sell a suit every 2 months instead of one every 5. Its an interesting and more modern way of approaching the business.
post #75 of 149
Wow, looks great Eddie. When are you going back for the finished garment?
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