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adventures in bespoke: Richard Anderson - Page 4

post #46 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

^ It's padded lightly, and builds up quite a bit at the end (at least more than on my Poole, and Chan, though similar to my Whitcomb). I think it's my shoulders that are already straight to begin with.

A tailor friend of mine took apart an old Huntsman jacket, just to see the innards and cut. I wasn't there when the dissection took place, but he verified that the shoulders were lightly padded and that Huntsman builds its famous Atlas silhouette with cutting alone. Man's victory over wool.
post #47 of 148
Yes. It's manipulated on the pattern. Cutters have told me that. I posted a picture on the NSM thread some time ago where lines are marked on the paper pattern.

Though I'm not sure that extremely sloped shoulders (Simon Crompton-esque slope) can be 'straightened' just by cut. Unless ... cutting magic.

A dropped shoulder, if it isn't severe, from what i understand, is adjusted/levelled on the pattern, and not with padding -- which still kind of boggles me.
post #48 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulianL View Post

Rather comically there was a typo in the Poole price book for the jacket price that I was quoted, either that or I somehow chose a fabric resulting in a jacket costing £24,599 plus VAT. I knew I had expensive tastes but that's pushing it, even for me.

Ha, maybe it was baby albino vicuna.
post #49 of 148
Thread Starter 
Was in London yesterday, and I was pleasantly surprised at how well everything fit during the basted. My impression is that Richard appears to take a highly methodical approach to assessing fit. It's almost as if he's going through a mental checklist while circling me and chaulking up various areas for attention. He's very affable - as you would expect - yet it's clear that the task at hand is what drives the interaction and fuels his focus. A very different set of intangibles as compared to my Mina fittings.

Overall, it was a very successful basted, and I really like the lines which are starting to take shape. We've finalized details such as 1-button closure with flapped pockets, 2 pockets for the waistcoat, and single pleat and cuffs for the trousers. Unfortunately, we had some issues with the camera so this is the best I can do for pics. Next fitting in 3 weeks.







post #50 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by medtech_expat View Post

Was in London yesterday, and I was pleasantly surprised at how well everything fit during the basted. My impression is that Richard appears to take a highly methodical approach to assessing fit. It's almost as if he's going through a mental checklist while circling me and chaulking up various areas for attention. He's very affable - as you would expect - yet it's clear that the task at hand is what drives the interaction and fuels his focus. A very different set of intangibles as compared to my Mina fittings.

Overall, it was a very successful basted, and I really like the lines which are starting to take shape. We've finalized details such as 1-button closure with flapped pockets, 2 pockets for the waistcoat, and single pleat and cuffs for the trousers. Unfortunately, we had some issues with the camera so this is the best I can do for pics. Next fitting in 3 weeks.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)







Interesting that you thought so as well. I thought I was alone in thinking that my experience with Mina and my English tailors during the fitting processes were somewhat different.
Edited by bboysdontcryy - 5/21/13 at 11:36am
post #51 of 148
Thread Starter 
I would suggest that Mina's and Richard's respective approaches mirror the characteristics of the resulting garments - Mina's of course more relaxed and comfortable, and Richard's more formal and structured.

I try to keep in mind that I've developed a personal relationship with both Mina and Dino, so perhaps it's no surprise that my fittings are above all else espresso-fueled social interactions. What she elicits from me more than anything is how the garment feels, and how I feel when wearing it. She of course marks up and pins the garment as needed as well as summarizes everything on video, but my feeling is that the adjustments needed are almost a byproduct or extension of our interaction. Bear in mind that my fittings typically take place during the course of an entire afternoon. Completely relaxed, and I enjoy the process.

Richard appears to take more of a clinical eye, zeroing in on specific areas of the garment. Again, he's very friendly and I didn't feel rushed at all, but the overall experience was fairly regimented and while not being clinical, had a much more exacting and precise nature to it. I really enjoyed my based fitting, and yet it struck me that the experience has the garment at the focal point, whereas with Mina the garment is more an extension of me.

I quite like both approaches for different reasons, and there may be overriding cultural aspects which impact the experience as much as the respective personalities of Mina and Richard.
post #52 of 148

Very interesting commentary. Your comparison of the two processes certainly convinces me that my personality is better suited to sticking with English firms (I don't use RA, but the fitting process is nonetheless very similar in nature to what you describe for him). I'd actually find the Italian version a bit disconcerting, I think. Horses for courses, I suppose.

post #53 of 148
Something that might contribute to the difference is the longstanding practice of the Savile Row firms to travel to customers, which necessitated a more systematic approach to fittings. Given the travel issues, initially by boat, a huge premium turned on getting it right in as few tries as possible. I recall that RA learned in that system, traveling to the US for Huntsman.
post #54 of 148
I can't speak for Italian tailors because I'm not conversant in that language to communicate with them, but the English tailors usually learn how to cut a coat/trousers in a very systematic and structured way, progressing through stages. Many cutters attended a school where they studied figurations and bespoke tailoring. I think one of the Dege guys (either Michael or his son) went to one such academy, as did Simon Cundey. At schools one'd expect that they are taught to approach issues in a more systematic fashion. After all, in order to teach smth, knowledge has to be codified. I was also told that if you focus on the use of manipulations, you'd tend to be somewhat more technical and systematic. Not sure if the Italians work with manipulations. Come to think of it, does anybody know if Italian cutters cut patterns for customers? I never inquired.

It's possible, though I'm not 100% certain, that many Italian tailors learn on the job and don't go to a tailoring college as such, which might also affect how they approach issues. Also possible that the nature of their apprenticeship (if they even have smth like that) is different. That and the different approach to tailoring between the Brits and Italians with the former's emphasis on creating a suit that attempts to emphasise classical proportions.

On a cultural note: Orderliness, discipline, rigidity, and a systematic approach to dealing with stuff (outside of tailoring) are also very much part of the English culture. School syllabi, the use of corporal punishment in schools, draconian and antiquated laws are all examples of this obsession with systematism and orderliness.
post #55 of 148
It was quite evident when I went for a fitting for my DB dinner suit. The top two show buttons were somewhat wide and didn't look right on me. I inquired and said it looked off and the reply was that 'there's a certain way of calculating the appropriate position and the angle of the show buttons on a coat such as this'. So, sometimes, the fixation on formula and system can compromise style in my opinion. And yes, I had them move the show buttons up, and bring them closer together.

With Mina, for me, it was more about 'how do you feel in it'? Do you like it? A very sensory-oriented fitting session.
post #56 of 148

That looks very nice, medtech.

post #57 of 148
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

It was quite evident when I went for a fitting for my DB dinner suit. The top two show buttons were somewhat wide and didn't look right on me. I inquired and said it looked off and the reply was that 'there's a certain way of calculating the appropriate position and the angle of the show buttons on a coat such as this'. So, sometimes, the fixation on formula and system can compromise style in my opinion. And yes, I had them move the show buttons up, and bring them closer together.


Funnily enough, I had the complementary DB button experience to yours recently, when I took in a very non-English jacket (unlined, unstructured, unpadded; you get the idea) to my English tailor for some alterations. One of the first things noted (after an initial shared moment of amusement/bemusement at the very nature of the jacket) was that the top show buttons weren't positioned correctly, and he then explained that same formula to me. In my case, the buttons actually looked better once they were moved down & in to their traditional placement. But I do agree that the important thing is whether they look right for you when you look in the mirror. But it happens that my preference seems to align with the English eye for these things.

post #58 of 148

Jacket is far too tight in the back and too tight in the front.

post #59 of 148
Apparently that's what fittings are for.
post #60 of 148
Subscribed.

(Btw, nice looking jacket, medtech)
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