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A foray into brown dress shoes

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Brunomagli Personally, the BM's I've seen are nothing to write home about, but I have no idea what the general quality tend to be. I'm wondering if this is a dark enough shade of brown, and whether it is worth it at a $130 price point (are the Brooks Bros. Peale or Alden shoes a better deal at $210, the functional price for me? I imagine the answer is yes).
post #2 of 16
I find the brown to be plenty dark enough, they certainly look to be worth $130, and might be too good a deal to pass up, especially if you like the style. Bruno Magli is at least a recognizable name....but I fear that they might really be WORTH $130, if you know what I mean. They offer a different kind of look than a Peale or Alden, so that decision will have to come down to how the shoe might fit in with the rest of your footwear and how complementary the shoe is with the rest of your wardrobe....I just can't recall anybody posting that they sincerely regretted that they bought Peale or Alden for a few bucks more.
post #3 of 16
I have those exact same shoes, won off of eBay for $100. They're good enough for what I use them for: backups for my C&J Handgrades. It does have a channeled sole, although at the waist the stitching is exposed (I think this is common for Italian shoes and such.) The leather is soft, but it's also thin and prone to creasing. Also, it seems to be aniline. I don't think I can pull off a good antique effect with it. They fit me perfectly, and I like how they look. I never tried the Peal or the Alden shoes, so I can't comment on how they compare.
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
The lack of being able to get a nice antiqued effect with them is what makes me hesitate -- and that is exactly what I expected when I looked at these. I think I'm going to go get a pair of the C & J Peales at BB. They have a pair of brown captoes that I really like and they already look like they are on the verge of getting an antiqued patina. I really am looking for a brown shoe for use with suits, and the BM just doesn't look like its it. For casual wear, I actually have a pair of Banana Republic shoes that have a stitched welt and have held up beautifully. And for my next pair of brown casual shoes I'm going to go with a pretty cool half-boot type thing from Johnston and Murphy that I saw discounted from $200 to $125. And I really like JM to be honest with you.
post #5 of 16
johnnynorman3, Just a heads up on Johnston and Murphy. If you see something you like at a Johnston and Murphy outlet, be sure and get the style number and size and call the Park City outlet store. Typically they have the same prices as the other outlets plus another 40 percent off. It's been a number of months since I went there, but they were a test outlet store. Everything 40 percent in addition to the marked-down price. Post what you find out if you happen to call them.
post #6 of 16
l never have been able to understand why anyone buys Bruno Magli shoes; they look like a very average construction [as all there shoes do]. Why don't you look elsewhere? l do like the look of Magli shoes though.
post #7 of 16
Originally posted by marc37:
Quote:
l never have been able to understand why anyone buys Bruno Magli shoes; they look like a very average construction [as all there shoes do]. Why don't you look elsewhere?
Same reason you buy Moreschi shoes and then subsequently wreck in the rain    (as you mentioned at AskAndy's).  At least Maglis uses much nicer leathers. Why aren't you using your Andy's monniker (marc_au, or shooman, or the one RJman gave u: Master B8man )?
post #8 of 16
Quote:
At least Maglis uses much nicer leathers.
That would not be accurate. Moreschi has a huge amount of leathers available to the buyers - all very good. Moreschi is a custom house. By that I mean shoe buyers (like myself) build the line and detail different leathers on different styles to achieve different things. Even their 'stock service' is really just the agents' building the line for a wider distribution. His customers are stores, not individual customers. The factory draws small distinction. So, depending on who you visit, the Moreschi line can be presented in many different lights. Bruno Magli, on the otherhand, is a traditional stock house. They build a line, schedule production and sell from stock. It has been quite a struggle for them recently, and it shows in the shoes. The shoe in question here is clearly a sprayed on finish. Over what can't be known unless we saw the shoe firsthand. I have yet to see Moreschi offer anything close in their swatch books - and I see them in Italy every six months to make up shoes. BTW, there might be plenty of Bruno's available later this year as they just declared bankruptcy and are re-organizing their operation here, including shutting down just about all of their retail locations.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Quote:
At least Maglis uses much nicer leathers.
That would not be accurate.  Moreschi has a huge amount of leathers available to the buyers - all very good.  Moreschi is a custom house.  By that I mean shoe buyers (like myself) build the line and detail different leathers on different styles to achieve different things.  Even their 'stock service' is really just the agents' building the line for a wider distribution.  His customers are stores, not individual customers. The factory draws small distinction.  So, depending on who you visit, the Moreschi line can be presented in many different lights. Bruno Magli, on the otherhand, is a traditional stock house.  They build a line, schedule production and sell from stock.  It has been quite a struggle for them recently, and it shows in the shoes.  The shoe in question here is clearly a sprayed on finish.  Over what can't be known unless we saw the shoe firsthand.  I have yet to see Moreschi offer anything close in their swatch books - and I see them in Italy every six months to make up shoes. BTW, there might be plenty of Bruno's available later this year as they just declared bankruptcy and are re-organizing their operation here, including shutting down just about all of their retail locations.
Well, from what I see here in the Netherlands and from looking at the shoes at the Magli store in Milan, I definitely think that Moreschi is a step lower in quality (and the price reflects it): leather is not as nice/supple, all are blake lasted. At least some of the nicer Maglis are goodyear. Maybe the stores that I have seen Moreschi do not order the better lines. You on the other hand get to see the more complete collections/selections.
post #10 of 16
Ah, forgot you were in Europe; sorry. Here in America, Bruno delivers a pretty moderate quality shoe. The US market generates over 75% of their revenue and I guess they chase business a little more aggressively. Of course, that has gotten them in trouble as their reputation here is not as good as it once was. Very similiar to Bally. I guess they figured the American market was not as sophisticated as Europe, so they can deliver inferior shoes for a high price. Just a guess. Actually, thinking about it, they are probably right. Most American customers have no idea, nor do they expect as much as our European counterparts. Excepting the gentleman on this forum, of course.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Quote:
(RIDER @ 25 June 2004, 1:50) Quote At least Maglis uses much nicer leathers.
That would not be accurate.  Moreschi has a huge amount of leathers available to the buyers - all very good.  Moreschi is a custom house.  By that I mean shoe buyers (like myself) build the line and detail different leathers on different styles to achieve different things.  Even their 'stock service' is really just the agents' building the line for a wider distribution.  His customers are stores, not individual customers. The factory draws small distinction.  So, depending on who you visit, the Moreschi line can be presented in many different lights. Bruno Magli, on the otherhand, is a traditional stock house.  They build a line, schedule production and sell from stock.  It has been quite a struggle for them recently, and it shows in the shoes.  The shoe in question here is clearly a sprayed on finish.  Over what can't be known unless we saw the shoe firsthand.  I have yet to see Moreschi offer anything close in their swatch books - and I see them in Italy every six months to make up shoes. BTW, there might be plenty of Bruno's available later this year as they just declared bankruptcy and are re-organizing their operation here, including shutting down just about all of their retail locations.
Well, from what I see here in the Netherlands and from looking at the shoes at the Magli store in Milan, I definitely think that Moreschi is a step lower in quality (and the price reflects it): leather is not as nice/supple, all are blake lasted.  At least some of the nicer Maglis are goodyear.  Maybe the stores that I have seen Moreschi do not order the better lines.  You on the other hand get to see the more complete collections/selections.[/quote] Utter non-sense: l don't know where you get this idea that Magli has better leathers. Moreshchi; a step below Magli, l don't think so. ;>
post #12 of 16
Originally posted by Marc37:
Quote:
Utter non-sense: l don't know where you get this idea that Magli has better leathers. Moreshchi; a step below Magli, l don't think so. ;>
Fly over to Milan and visit the Magli store will you (oh, I forgot, you can't travel ). Mate, the Moreschi's here are a dime a dozen, and not very nice. I think I would know a bit better living here in Europe.
post #13 of 16
l've seen many Magli's and Moreshci's in Oz. The moreshci has always struck me as a better shoe, l have never worn magli though. Then again; after wrecking a pair of Moreshci's after only 6 wears, l will get artioli bespoke instead of moreshci in future. lt is very interesting how maglis are perceived as better [than moreshci] in Europe. There have been quite a few seasons of ordinary looking moreshci's but this seasons are really nice. We don''t seem to get the really top Maglis in Oz [not like the photo's on the website]. What do other people think? Are Magli better than Moreshci? Anyone ever heard of Hobson or Aldo Brue? Edited by marc37 on 28 June 2004, 12:52
post #14 of 16
You're both right. As Rider stated in the past, Moreschi offers a gambit of products for different markets.  Most of the time I think their shoes are hideous and totally overpriced.  The two models I own, however, are comfortable and elegantly simple. Bruno Magli also varies considerably. Their platinum and handmade lines offered at Barney's and Sak's are much nicer than the $300-400 mid-range Moreschi.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Here in America, Bruno delivers a pretty moderate quality shoe. . . . that has gotten them in trouble as their reputation here is not as good as it once was.  
Hmmm... I think there may be another reason for the decline in popularity of Bruno Magli shoes in the US... It's bad enough for Bruno Magli to have their shoes associated with a double murderer, but he also referred to them as "ugly-ass shoes," which I'm sure didn't help sales.
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