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French Tailoring Thread (e.g. Camps de Luca, Cifonelli, Smalto and etc.) - Page 52

post #766 of 1044
Thanks for this HighToned. Do you have any sense of whether the bespoke house style is more staid than the RTW? It seems like they are very focused on the U.S. market and providing top notch bespoke service to clients here. The RTW stuff is a little fashion-forward for me but the workmanship looks beautiful.
post #767 of 1044

Berluti kept the "Rive Gauche" style of Arnys. It's quite softer on the structure, more casual and colorful than others tailors in Paris.

They still taking care of Arnys bespoke customers. I saw many silk linings with Arnys initials reserved for old customers.

 

Arnys family didn't have much succession to take care of the business. Alfredo Orlandi was in charge at the atelier at this time. He is very kind old timer with eager to share his tailoring skills. He should be retired but he still wants to work. 

 

Mr Alfredo Orlandi chooses to push Karim Rehabi to be in charge so they can save the history of Arnys. 

Tailor, Karim Rehabi is travelling all over the world to promote French tailoring. I don't think the focus is on US, they send him in Asia also or a lot in the new shop in London.  

 

Berluti wants to provide a full bespoke service. Either it's for a suits, shoes, jeans, shirts, coats, tuxedos, sport jackets and trench coats...

Alessandro Sartori didn't touch the bespoke style. But he designed few bespoke garments to provide advices to new customers. Those garments are on display at Berluti shops.

 

On the RTW side, designer Alessandro Sartori incorporate few aspects of Arnys tailoring such as leather buttonholes, inner pockets details but yes the RTW is fashion forward. 


Edited by HighToned - 3/25/14 at 10:38am
post #768 of 1044


Arnys Rive Gauche
post #769 of 1044
post #770 of 1044
Can he make things levitate with his mind?
post #771 of 1044

Le Bespoke Tailoring de notre pays nous confectionne un art onéreux et d’un autre temps, est pas du tout dans le courant actuel. Le savoir-faire dans la grande-mesure est incontestable et nous sommes au summum de l’art artisanal. Mais ce n’est pas suffisant.

C’est la même chose comme si tu te mettais un costume de Humphrey Bogart, il semblerait ancien, déphasé, et le plus distrait te dirais "bien qu’élégants, je te voie un peu bizarre…". Par contre si ma femme se mettait une robe de Lauren Bacall elle serait simplement ridicule. La mode masculine, évolue très lentement et certains en profite pour s’endormir. Un petit dépoussiérage ne ferait pas de mal.

post #772 of 1044
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

A nice illustration of the French view on bespoke tailoring. Duret is a French maker of leather goods and belts. I wanted a bespoke belt made to my specifications but won't be in Paris until October. I contacted Duret and told them my belt size and also that my tailor was Parisian and could give detailed information about my measurements. Duret told me that in order to get the appropriate size, they would send me a package with instructions. Today, I received from Duret a canvas belt with cork and nail attached via leather at one end, and a leather capsule at the other end. It is a simple but nifty way to get an accurate belt size. It came with instructions in English. All of this was sent international mail with a customs declaration at no cost to me. Sure, they could have just accepted my measurement over the phone and sent me a belt, but then I might not have measured right and I wouldn't be happy. Typical of my experience with those who really want to get it right. Pictures below (with Cifonelli bespoke trousers and a Charvet bespoke shirt thrown in for good measure). Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)




An update on the process of Duret. They don't accept credit cards, so non-Parisian clients have to wire euros just like with Passaggio Cravatte or Vass. Once they receive your trial belt and your wire transfer, details are confirmed in writing. Now for the waiting...
post #773 of 1044
A few pics of Jean Rotin, french tailor from Marseilles:








(the lapels will not be that large)
Edited by Amar ezzahi - 4/3/14 at 11:27am
post #774 of 1044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amar ezzahi View Post

A few pics of Jean Rotin, french tailor from Marseilles:
(the lapels will not be that large)

What a shame! Would have been LIKE A BAWS!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amar ezzahi View Post

A few pics of Jean Rotin, french tailor from Marseilles:
post #775 of 1044
On the top of the hip-hop.
post #776 of 1044
Lanvin

Lauwers starting @ 4:04: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U63PWOOcbN0

Lauwers con't and then the tailors @ 2:44: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hhYU6tAg10M
post #777 of 1044
FYI, current issue of WWD has an article on Parisian tailors...
post #778 of 1044
Thanks for posting kuro. I just read it. I never realized camps was so much more expensive than cifo. Interesting to read about cifo's ready to wear plans, and of course they have pictures of the qilian jacket in yak wool, which I'm hoping to have the bravery to order when Lorenzo visits in a few weeks.
post #779 of 1044
Kuro, any chance of a link to that article?
post #780 of 1044
^need a subscription to read it online, but a couple of photos floating around the net..


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