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French Tailoring Thread (e.g. Camps de Luca, Cifonelli, Smalto and etc.) - Page 50

post #736 of 1429
Pic of Marc du Luca getting medal from President Hollande yesterday:

http://dirnelli.tumblr.com/post/80074394321/bespoke-tailor-marc-de-luca-receives-ordre
post #737 of 1429
And here I introduce a picture of the Pape suit to the thread after making a maiden voyage there today.

Pape is the only shop in Paris that offers, among their many cuts, one RTW model that is a likeness of the Camps de Luca notch lapel:

http://dirnelli.tumblr.com/post/80076787744/trying-on-a-suit-at-pape-the-only-shop-in-paris
post #738 of 1429
Would love to see shots of any of these Cifo/CdL/Smalto/Arnys/Berulti jackets in action shot poses... Showing how the suit moves when the arm is extended forwards or outwards.

Since these are more structured than most of the Italian stuff, curious to see if they move well or if everything gets jacked up when you're not "at attention."
post #739 of 1429
The French pop star Claude Francois was tailored by Camps De Luca throughout his whole career, starting from the 1960s. You can easily find video examples of him dancing in his CdL suits, it'll give you a good idea of how they move. That's what made CdL famous in part: the tailored look that you could actually dance around in, and still the suit would look impeccable. For lack of time right now, I defer to another one of the thread followers to find a good link to illustrate my point with a link or an embed to a YouTube video.
post #740 of 1429
^Can't speak to the others but Cifo provides lots of drape to give freedom of movement. It is just that the drape is in the back on the shoulder rather than the front. I don't have action shots, but I don't think anything gets jacked up. The whole beauty of the suit is that you have something that looks structured and clean, and form fitting, but that doesn't restrict or feel stuffy.
post #741 of 1429
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirnelli View Post

The French pop star Claude Francois was tailored by Camps De Luca throughout his whole career, starting from the 1960s. You can easily find video examples of him dancing in his CdL suits, it'll give you a good idea of how they move. That's what made CdL famous in part: the tailored look that you could actually dance around in, and still the suit would look impeccable. For lack of time right now, I defer to another one of the thread followers to find a good link to illustrate my point with a link or an embed to a YouTube video.

Like this?

The man can dance.
post #742 of 1429
in this video you can see lorenzo cifonelli moving around in one of his suits.

http://www.linternaute.com/video/124327/comment-choisir-un-costume/
post #743 of 1429
this video is painful to watch, but presumably the garments that Alexander Kraft is wearing are cifonelli and so you get to see them moving around in slow motion around the grounds of an estate while elevator music plays in the background.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVdAG-D1EX4
post #744 of 1429

Quote:

Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

A nice illustration of the French view on bespoke tailoring. Duret is a French maker of leather goods and belts. I wanted a bespoke belt made to my specifications but won't be in Paris until October. I contacted Duret and told them my belt size and also that my tailor was Parisian and could give detailed information about my measurements. Duret told me that in order to get the appropriate size, they would send me a package with instructions. Today, I received from Duret a canvas belt with cork and nail attached via leather at one end, and a leather capsule at the other end. It is a simple but nifty way to get an accurate belt size. It came with instructions in English. All of this was sent international mail with a customs declaration at no cost to me. Sure, they could have just accepted my measurement over the phone and sent me a belt, but then I might not have measured right and I wouldn't be happy. Typical of my experience with those who really want to get it right. Pictures below (with Cifonelli bespoke trousers and a Charvet bespoke shirt thrown in for good measure).
 

That's awesome. May I ask who made the monks?

 

This thread, and RJMan's incredible post over on ASW, has convinced me that I will wear Charvet shirts one day. If you'll excuse me, I have to go buy a ski mask.

 

http://asuitablewardrobe.blogspot.com/2014/03/here-there-be-dragons.html

post #745 of 1429
^Those monks are G&G. I bought them on sale at Leffot. So not french, but pretty good nonetheless. My experience with Charvet is similar to RJMan's. They are incomparable. A telling Charvet experience: two weeks ago I called to request some new swatches (those above are what I received) and to make a few changes to my pattern. Because I'm an American and also because I don't measure things very frequently, I made a mistake when conveying my changes to Charvet. I requested a change of 1 millimeter rather than 1 centimeter. The person helping me at Charvet told me that 1 milimeter was fairly small, and that while Charvet would be happy to do it, perhaps I would consider two millimeters. I agreed because who am I to argue with Charvet. When I got home, I took out a tape measure. I realized that 1 milimeter is .03 inches. Two millimeters is, of course, twice that amount. A tiny measure. But those are the differences in which Charvet works. 2 millimeter increments. Any other shirt maker would have told me that I was crazy, because a 2 millimeter change is crazy. When I called back to correct my error, Charvet told me that they would be happy to take my changes in inches and were capable of completing the shirt that way. But I thought it was telling that they would think of 2 millimeters as a sufficient amount to necessitate a change. And I helps explain why they seem to produce a shirt that, at least for me, fits far, far better than any of the many other shirtmakers I've used.
post #746 of 1429
Was the change on the collar, or the body / sleevs etc? 2mm is "fussy" on a collar (1/16 inch), but meaningless on a body.

If you originally were asking for a centimeter, it makes me think it would be on the body, in which case I'm surprised they wouldn't tell you that's silly (since they were under the impression you meant millimeters). It's less than the error in the amount of shrinkage from fabric to fabric...

(I realize the underlying story is that they're willing to be extremely detailed, which is nice)
post #747 of 1429
Quote:
Originally Posted by archetypal_yuppie View Post

Was the change on the collar, or the body / sleevs etc? 2mm is "fussy" on a collar (1/16 inch), but meaningless on a body.

If you originally were asking for a centimeter, it makes me think it would be on the body, in which case I'm surprised they wouldn't tell you that's silly (since they were under the impression you meant millimeters). It's less than the error in the amount of shrinkage from fabric to fabric...

(I realize the underlying story is that they're willing to be extremely detailed, which is nice)

For Charvet bespoke, the fabric is pre-shrunk, so there is no shrinkage once the shirt is cut. The changes were to the collar, waist, chest and sleeves.
post #748 of 1429
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

^Those monks are G&G. I bought them on sale at Leffot. So not french, but pretty good nonetheless. My experience with Charvet is similar to RJMan's. They are incomparable. A telling Charvet experience: two weeks ago I called to request some new swatches (those above are what I received) and to make a few changes to my pattern. Because I'm an American and also because I don't measure things very frequently, I made a mistake when conveying my changes to Charvet. I requested a change of 1 millimeter rather than 1 centimeter. The person helping me at Charvet told me that 1 milimeter was fairly small, and that while Charvet would be happy to do it, perhaps I would consider two millimeters. I agreed because who am I to argue with Charvet. When I got home, I took out a tape measure. I realized that 1 milimeter is .03 inches. Two millimeters is, of course, twice that amount. A tiny measure. But those are the differences in which Charvet works. 2 millimeter increments. Any other shirt maker would have told me that I was crazy, because a 2 millimeter change is crazy. When I called back to correct my error, Charvet told me that they would be happy to take my changes in inches and were capable of completing the shirt that way. But I thought it was telling that they would think of 2 millimeters as a sufficient amount to necessitate a change. And I helps explain why they seem to produce a shirt that, at least for me, fits far, far better than any of the many other shirtmakers I've used.

Very cool story. bigstar[1].gif
post #749 of 1429
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by YRR92 View Post

Quote:
That's awesome. May I ask who made the monks?

This thread, and RJMan's incredible post over on ASW, has convinced me that I will wear Charvet shirts one day. If you'll excuse me, I have to go buy a ski mask.

http://asuitablewardrobe.blogspot.com/2014/03/here-there-be-dragons.html

My impression is that you get the most out of Charvet when you are experienced and know what you are doing. They may offer numerous options, but they will wait for you to ask and you will have to know to ask for it. Some of my best bespoke experiences are when I learn something and some makers are willing to discuss things and teach you something. I'm not sure you get that at Charvet and perhaps they expect you to be learned from the start.
post #750 of 1429
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post


My impression is that you get the most out of Charvet when you are experienced and know what you are doing. They may offer numerous options, but they will wait for you to ask and you will have to know to ask for it. Some of my best bespoke experiences are when I learn something and some makers are willing to discuss things and teach you something. I'm not sure you get that at Charvet and perhaps they expect you to be learned from the start.

Well, as ridiculous as this sounds (counting my chickens long before they're fertilized, much less hatched), but I doubt Charvet would be my first shirtmaker. That would be too presumptuous, even for me. Even if I won the lottery, I wouldn't be hopping on a plane to go buy some shirts -- I love the idea of their flexibility, but I agree that to get the most out of it, it seems like you needs to both know a thing or two about ordering shirt and to know yourself well enough to make choices with confidence. That seems to be something that trips up many people when they begin to order custom clothing -- asking for things because they can.

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