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French Tailoring Thread (e.g. Camps de Luca, Cifonelli, Smalto and etc.) - Page 110

post #1636 of 1737
Not a bad idea.

Uncertain of sizing, but I guess crazier things have happened?
post #1637 of 1737
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dandy Wonka View Post

It's not too late to do that.

The store on rue de Sevres keeps the old buttons in the back, at least that's what they said last year when I visited. If you are still in Paris consider checking out the buttons to see if you like them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

Not a bad idea.

Uncertain of sizing, but I guess crazier things have happened?

The Forestiere fits large. I've tried several variations but so far none were flattering on me. I suggest you try one on in real life.
post #1638 of 1737
Will Berluti make a Forestiere with all the labeling and buttons as if still Arnys?
post #1639 of 1737
You really need to try on the Forestiere before buying. It fits really large. I went down 2 sizes from my normal size and it was still too big/unflattering. I like the idea of the jacket, but not the execution.
post #1640 of 1737
I have read that they are all large apart from the double-sided cashmere one (which I got). That one is designed by Sartori based on the other one and cut down.
post #1641 of 1737
I'm following this thread since a while without taking part as I'm not much advised as you all are.
I'm thinking about the commision of a first bespoke suit for my wedding. I guess that some of you will recommand me to try Camps de Luca for their style and quality.
I saw a picture of their work showing some machine sewings while I always heard it was fully handmade. Are they still providing the same quality level or should I better try another option ? (I live in Bruxelles)

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post #1642 of 1737
^I assume that they use a sewing machine for the long seams. Some pieces I would want handsewn. Others I wouldn't really care. If it is important to you then you might just ask them. I'm sure they would be happy to explain what they do and why they do it.
post #1643 of 1737
post #1644 of 1737
Nowadays, so many say hand guided can mean hand sewn, instead of put in a jig and then push a button. Hand guided allows any curve to be sewn. Jigged follows the jig, which, may not fit the person. I wonder how many will use a thimble for all the sewing? If you pay more it might be possible to find someone who will who is worth it.
post #1645 of 1737
Thanks much for your answers, the article on Permanent Style is indeed really interesting.
If I'm right the hand-stitching of the canvas and lapels are the most important part and make the difference with the ready to wear. Is it true ?
post #1646 of 1737
The above picture is showing a hand padded canvass but machines padded lapel.

Big no no for me...especially paying for that sort of bespoke price tags....
Edited by add911_11 - 2/4/16 at 4:43pm
post #1647 of 1737
Quote:
Originally Posted by belgiumdapper View Post

Thanks much for your answers, the article on Permanent Style is indeed really interesting.
If I'm right the hand-stitching of the canvas and lapels are the most important part and make the difference with the ready to wear. Is it true ?

No. There's plenty of hand stitched RTW and machine made bespoke.
post #1648 of 1737
The opposition between handmade and machine made is articifial, it's like saying that a novel written on a computer is not as worthy as one written with a goose quill.
post #1649 of 1737
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirnelli View Post

The opposition between handmade and machine made is articifial, it's like saying that a novel written on a computer is not as worthy as one written with a goose quill.

It's a romantic notion. There are places on a garment where the hand is trying to emulate the consistency of a machine.

Equally, there are places on a garment where significant sums have been spent to develop machines that can execute a stitch with the characteristics previously only available by hand-sewing. Not better or worse, just a economy of scale which may lead to a more affordable garment.

What is left between the two is an aesthetic preference, as you yourself acknowledge by adding hand-seen buttonieres. As someone else once said, "imperfection is perfection".
post #1650 of 1737
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

The above picture is showing a hand padded canvass but machines padded lapel.

Big no no for me...especially paying for that sort of bespoke price tags....

...then you should have a look at what Oxxford Clothes makes in America. Hand-padded lapels take around an hour to make at least, if the maker is careful, and it's boring work -- I guess this explains the markup.
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