or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › French Tailoring Thread (e.g. Camps de Luca, Cifonelli, Smalto and etc.)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

French Tailoring Thread (e.g. Camps de Luca, Cifonelli, Smalto and etc.) - Page 8

post #106 of 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by andreyb2 View Post

Here is how Arnys' windows look right now:



You can still see traces of "Arnys" name up there.

Andrey

Last I checked, Arny's were still doing bespoke out of a separate space by appointment only.
post #107 of 1045


left is feruch
right is smalto

my right arm is much longer then my father's was.
post #108 of 1045

The Smalto looks very nice.

 

Carl - what led your father to French tailors? Did he live in Paris?

post #109 of 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post

The Smalto looks very nice.

Carl - what led your father to French tailors? Did he live in Paris?

both are quite nice.
post #110 of 1045
Guys,

To give you some colour, I've just posted some very personal reviews of French tailors, shirtmakers and bootmakers on my Tumblr blog:

http://dirnelli.tumblr.com/search/review

Enjoy!
post #111 of 1045
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirnelli View Post

Guys,

To give you some colour, I've just posted some very personal reviews of French tailors, shirtmakers and bootmakers on my Tumblr blog:

http://dirnelli.tumblr.com/search/review

Enjoy!

It sounds like you have been looking for a more affordable alternative to CdL (which I think is your best suit by far) and it is quite understandable given the price. What type of cloth are you using for the copies? Have you tried using the old fashioned heavy full bodied London Lounge type cloths? I wonder if it might be easier for a cheaper non-CdL tailor to get the cleaner look that you seek with a fuller bodied cloth. CdL and other great tailors can get you the ideal look, no matter the material, but that is why you pay them the premium.
post #112 of 1045
my father was in France during WWII.
became a bit of a francophile
not sure how he found these tailors without the help of the internet.

I guess the old fashioned way. He must have asked other well dressed men.
post #113 of 1045
Come to think of it, I beleive Cifonelli RTW used to be D'Avenza, not St. Andrews. I think I have a cashmere blazer from that period, and it's not as nice as the recent Caruso stuff for Cifonelli.
post #114 of 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post
\
not sure how he found these tailors without the help of the internet.

I guess the old fashioned way. He must have asked other well dressed men.

 

 It boggles the mind. Thanks for posting the pics.

post #115 of 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by dirnelli View Post

Come to think of it, I beleive Cifonelli RTW used to be D'Avenza, not St. Andrews. I think I have a cashmere blazer from that period, and it's not as nice as the recent Caruso stuff for Cifonelli.

 

I see you made no mention of Smalto bespoke in your review. Does he not offer true bespoke any longer, or have you simply not used their service?

post #116 of 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post

I see you made no mention of Smalto bespoke in your review. Does he not offer true bespoke any longer, or have you simply not used their service?

I simply have no Smalto bespoke in my wardrobe as yet. No Isaia either for that matter.
Edited by dirnelli - 5/7/13 at 5:52am
post #117 of 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

I guess the old fashioned way. He must have asked other well dressed men.

rotflmao.gif

I tried to photograph that shirt you sent me but couldn't get the details. Now that I have some extension tubes for my camera I think I can pull it off, if you wouldn't mind commenting them, as you are the shirt expert.
post #118 of 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

It sounds like you have been looking for a more affordable alternative to CdL (which I think is your best suit by far) and it is quite understandable given the price. What type of cloth are you using for the copies? Have you tried using the old fashioned heavy full bodied London Lounge type cloths? I wonder if it might be easier for a cheaper non-CdL tailor to get the cleaner look that you seek with a fuller bodied cloth. CdL and other great tailors can get you the ideal look, no matter the material, but that is why you pay them the premium.

So far the issue in replicating the CdL cut has not been fabric choice, although I do agree that a lesser tailor will have an easier job of it getting a suit to fall right using a heavier cloth.

The issue I've faced has been their simple ability to copy/paste the trademark lapel and collar shape, which none of them have gotten right so far. Granted, I'm a maniac, measuring down to the millimeter each proportion of the lapel line. Given that most MTM tailors are accustomed to a 5 mm tolerance on just about every measurement (i.e. it's the accepted practice that the factory doesn't have to redo the jacket if a measurement is off by 5 mm or less), I think it's come as a surprise to all of them that I was pushing to redo the trademark lapel, which I didn't consider a true resemblance. A common mistake was the angle of the stitch between the collar and lapel. On a CdL collar, the edges of the collar and the stitch form 3 sides of a perfect rectangle -- this is so striking and so trademark that I was continually upset that the MTM tailors were missing it, showing me that they really didn't take more than 2 seconds to look at what Camps has done.
post #119 of 1045
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

rotflmao.gif

I tried to photograph that shirt you sent me but couldn't get the details. Now that I have some extension tubes for my camera I think I can pull it off, if you wouldn't mind commenting them, as you are the shirt expert.
i will be happy to comment on your photos
post #120 of 1045

awesome info gents

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › French Tailoring Thread (e.g. Camps de Luca, Cifonelli, Smalto and etc.)