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Books on interviewing

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hey, 

 

I'm an aspiring lawyer and am coming up to clerkship season.

 

Could anyone recommend some good books on interviewing? similar to resume and cover letter magic.

 

- Thanks, Oliver. 

post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

Hey, 

 

I'm an aspiring lawyer and am coming up to clerkship season.

 

Could anyone recommend some good books on interviewing? similar to resume and cover letter magic.

 

- Thanks, Oliver. 

A lot schools have interview assistance through their Career Center. You may be able to do mock interviews and get feedback from someone who's familiar with the industry. Check with your school. That could be a great solution.

post #3 of 7
Yep. Agreed. Why isn't your school making book recs and doing mock interviews?
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

My university is hopeless, especially for something which requires a level of expertise.

post #5 of 7

That's unfortunate. My uni's career counseling office isn't great, but they can give the basics. Incidentally, I just reviewed like 20 legal resumes; please please please make sure that it is perfect. It really matters. I saw one where the applicant misspelled the name of a COURT for which the applicant had clerked. If you can, be sure to tailor it to the firm you are applying to and your area of interest. I never really cared about hobbies unless they were really cool (most were lame).

 

~ H
 

post #6 of 7
Oliver-
I strongly recommend checking out Manager-Tools.com. They have a series on interviewing. The real secrets to interviewing success are to know yourself and practice. Be prepared to answer questions about you. Many people mistakenly enter an interview thinking that they need to know everything about the company, with which they're interviewing. A cursory knowledge is all that's needed there. Prepare by knowing the answer to questions like: What are your strengths and weaknesses (don't lie, we all have them)? What are you doing to mitigate or overcome your weaknesses? What's your background? What applicable experience do you bring? What makes you want to work for this firm (it better be about what you'll do for them and not what you get out of the deal)? How would you prepare for a specific type of case?

Remember that you want to demonstrate three things during the interview: 1) Fit, 2) Interest, 3) Rapport. I recommend having a friend or significant other ask you questions (like those above), and videotaping your answers. Do the answers seem canned? Do you seem relaxed with answers coming easily? Do you smile? Watch the video tapes, then practice again. Then when you think you're ready, practice some more.

Best of luck!
Andy
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by RagnorakPA View Post

Oliver-
I strongly recommend checking out Manager-Tools.com. They have a series on interviewing. The real secrets to interviewing success are to know yourself and practice. Be prepared to answer questions about you. Many people mistakenly enter an interview thinking that they need to know everything about the company, with which they're interviewing. A cursory knowledge is all that's needed there. Prepare by knowing the answer to questions like: What are your strengths and weaknesses (don't lie, we all have them)? What are you doing to mitigate or overcome your weaknesses? What's your background? What applicable experience do you bring? What makes you want to work for this firm (it better be about what you'll do for them and not what you get out of the deal)? How would you prepare for a specific type of case?

Remember that you want to demonstrate three things during the interview: 1) Fit, 2) Interest, 3) Rapport. I recommend having a friend or significant other ask you questions (like those above), and videotaping your answers. Do the answers seem canned? Do you seem relaxed with answers coming easily? Do you smile? Watch the video tapes, then practice again. Then when you think you're ready, practice some more.

Best of luck!
Andy

+1 to those! When I've gone for interviews, I always learn a bit about the company and prepare answers to all of the likely questions that I can think of. I also write down a list of all of the questions that I want to get answered during the interview. When you do that, the conversation flows along instead of being tense and choppy. Since you already know what you want to say and what you want to know, you can contribute to and direct the conversation more.

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