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I bought 3 Tom Fords and I feel terrible about it. - Page 14

post #196 of 221
Thread Starter 
I'm sure Ford does not do it himself .
post #197 of 221
Fair enough. I think I read that when Daniel Craig was being fitted for skyfall, Italian master tailors (presumably employed by TF) took all the measurements.
post #198 of 221
Buying high end suits, just like buying anything else, has to be sensible and calculated to a certain degree.
Be it bespoke, MTM or OTR, I personally think a bit of research into what you are going to buy will save you from unexpected remorse.

I personally own quite a few Tom Ford suits over the years, sports jackets, blazers, pants of different fabric, shirts, etc. That is all I wear now these days simply because I have learned to appreciate the workmanship & quality that has been invested in Tom Ford pieces.
I didn't simply jumped into the hype and drama surrounding Tom Ford the brand but I was intrigued enough by the ongoing debate on Tom Ford at the time, and I took the time to find out what the hype was all about. And I wasn't expecting to be floored by his 'sartorial intuition' from an ex-creative designer from Gucci. I have been on a quest for classic menswear that stands the test of time, not buying into something fashionable. And of course, unexpectedly for me, during my quest in exploring TF's clothing, it led me to discover the immense quality and fit Tom Ford offers that very few OTR or ready-to-wear offers in this vast market, that fitted my body the way I wanted it to be.

I am glad I did not have to go through the hassle of going bespoke to convey how I want the chest portion of the suit to look like this or how I want the the shoulders to look like that. And to fork out a few grand based on an image of how you want the suit to look like in your head, which may or may not be conveyed to the tailor in his own head, and that is the big gamble, to me. And I do not want to load my wardrobe with clothes or suits that I dont wear.

I must credit Jefferyd's post on his blog. It certainly helped foster my understanding on the construction of suits in general, as well Tom Ford's. I have been a 'victim' of paying full price for Tom Ford's suits, pants, shirts and I had my fair share of attaining them at discounted prices. Would I pay full price for a Tom Ford suit again? I absolutely would. My recent purchase was a beautiful navy large check 3-piece suit and it is consistent with the price of OP's.
The quality of a suit has to be appreciated and one has to be able to make an informed choice, Price always comes up in debates like this. Pay what you think it is worth and then, there will be (little) remorse.

Does Tom Ford do bespoke?
I believe if you have the means in your pocket to do it, Tom Ford will offer it.
Customised shoes, bags, shirts, and bespoke Tom Ford suits, etc.
Tom Ford has a master tailor who will accommodate to it. And I believe at this stage, only at Madison Ave? Correct me if i"m wrong.
I know the master tailor travels around the globe only for MTM annually.

Congrats to OP on your wonderful 3-pieces. Quite a jump to get all 3 at once.
Nevertheless, enjoy them.
post #199 of 221
Thread Starter 
Thanks :-). ( I also have the midnight blue 3 piece)

I was with Gucci before and now I have moved on to Tom Fords.

The Gucci RTW fit me like a glove with virtually no tailoring .

The Fords fit very well.....but not quite like the Gucci.

Below is a pic of my TF and a Gucci for a photo spread i did for GQ in another country.

If you notice the TF arm is quite baggy and will need some work....however my hand is in my pocket while with the the Gucci my hands are spread out

**** note I only just learned that with a TF you need a TF shirt. I just bought a bunch :-)


Tom Ford black three piece
imagegcw.jpg


Gucci black 2 piece

imageafrr.jpg
post #200 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by othertravel View Post

Fair enough. I think I read that when Daniel Craig was being fitted for skyfall, Italian master tailors (presumably employed by TF) took all the measurements.

 



...and then they threw them in the trash and just wrapped him in cloth and ran him through a heat shrinker? :)

post #201 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

This was a 4 grand OTR garment. What more would I have gained from going bespoke?


To my eye, what you make for yourself is clearly superior. It is not one specific detail, but the sum of the parts.

http://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/search/label/Harrisons



The back to this is so clean with just the right amount of drape, that I imagine it is hard to find the same in RTW.

http://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/search/label/Holland%20and%20Sherry

post #202 of 221
Thread Starter 
WOW !!!

Looking good!!!
post #203 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

This was a 4 grand OTR garment. What more would I have gained from going bespoke?

[IMG ALT=""]http://www.styleforum./net/content/type/61/id/784946/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

Looks great. But I'm wondering about three things: (1) alterations done, (2) unseen elements of fit, and (3) styling.

1) Did you alter the jacket at all? If so, how much? How difficult were the alterations? How easy would it be to find an alterations tailor with the eye and skill to perform them? What do you think they would cost if one could find such a person?

2) How do the collar and armholes fit, particularly while you're moving? One thing often mentioned on the forum is that these tend to be loose with rtw, even if the jacket fits well everywhere else.

3) Are you happy with all the stylistic elements?
post #204 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by gegarrenton View Post


I don't disagree with your last paragraph at all. However I vehemently disagree with the postulation that OTR gets anyone 99% there. With the plethora of human dimensions, it's just not going to happen. You have a better chance of winning the lottery.

FWIW, I would only consider a handful of bespoke houses either. Not all that many get it right.


I have, and my immediate response is not "you should have gone bespoke". Unless the question is "should i buy a 6 grand OTR garment", then yes, the answer is "you should have gone bespoke."

The problem is the guy is obviously new to the field, so it's not how much he spent, going bespoke on the first serious suit, is in my opinion always a mistake. My taste changed over the years, what I knew about tailoring changed over the years as well. I am glad I haven't gone bespoke on the first try, because I wouldn't wear it anymore. It's not like I would have asked for a dramatic cut suit on the first try, it's lapel width, amount of padding, hacking pocket size that kind things.

A 6K suit that fit well is a good suit regardless RTW or bespoke. You can get it decently right on the first try on a RTW (if it looked awful you would put it back on the rack). 6K bespoke on first suit is a gamble, even with the best house. They might have done it "correctly" by all standard, but it is quite likely it's not something you want as you don't even know what aesthetics you like at that point. Would I suggest OP keep buying Tom Ford until the end of the world? No, he should try different RTW from time to time, and see what he really likes going forward. It takes time to know yourself well enough to see what needs to be changed. He only know something looks "off" at the moment, and doesn't really know what is "right" for himself. I don't think he is ready for bespoke garment.
post #205 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post

I'm glad you've decided to get into tailoring as a hobby but I feel you should have fair warning: Scott Discik is like the opposite of what folks around here stand for. In this forum we tend to lean towards very classic looks (that is, nothing exaggerated that will look dated in 10 years, as you found with your Armani shoulders), no silk cloths, no bright colours.

There is nothing wrong with that style per se, but it just doesn't appeal to this group of people. Essentially anything that can be deemed as "peacocking" goes out of the window.

People will be happy to advise you on good quality brands, nice cloth, good construction techniques, but don't expect much love for super-fashionable looks.

What's so fashion forward about Scott Discik?

http://www.fortheyoungdude.com/2011/09/like-your-style-scott-disick/

Other than rumpling clothe and pull at buttoning point it looks normal to me, the jacket is not even too short foo.gif (ok, lapel is on the larger side, but besides that)
post #206 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

To my eye, what you make for yourself is clearly superior. It is not one specific detail, but the sum of the parts.

http://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/search/label/Harrisons



The back to this is so clean with just the right amount of drape, that I imagine it is hard to find the same in RTW.

http://tuttofattoamano.blogspot.com/search/label/Holland%20and%20Sherry


The one he made for himself has more volume in the chest, I am not sure if this is style or better. The sleeve looks equal clean. Collar sits higher in his own suit (or further back). Working button resulted flare (for lack of better word) looks better on his own suit, and that is actually one thing which is quite fixable in RTW.
post #207 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by clee1982 View Post

The one he made for himself has more volume in the chest, I am not sure if this is style or better. The sleeve looks equal clean. Collar sits higher in his own suit (or further back). Working button resulted flare (for lack of better word) looks better on his own suit, and that is actually one thing which is quite fixable in RTW.

The RTW looks too long for that shoulder type. I think the long coat works better with the strong roped shoulder. As I said, it is not one thing, but the sum of the parts.
post #208 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by othertravel View Post

Fair enough. I think I read that when Daniel Craig was being fitted for skyfall, Italian master tailors (presumably employed by TF) took all the measurements.

Then that's a pretty good argument for avoiding TF MTM and sticking to OTR, because those suits looked positively atrocious. They didn't even come close to fitting him.
post #209 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

To my eye, what you make for yourself is clearly superior. It is not one specific detail, but the sum of the parts.

The back to this is so clean with just the right amount of drape, that I imagine it is hard to find the same in RTW.


Thank you. Yes, the back (which includes the back of the sleeves) are usually the weakest point in RTW. In the case of the POW jacket posted above, I did have to do some work on the back itself, but the sleeves were even better than the ones I cut myself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Looks great. But I'm wondering about three things: (1) alterations done, (2) unseen elements of fit, and (3) styling.

1) Did you alter the jacket at all? If so, how much? How difficult were the alterations? How easy would it be to find an alterations tailor with the eye and skill to perform them? What do you think they would cost if one could find such a person?

2) How do the collar and armholes fit, particularly while you're moving? One thing often mentioned on the forum is that these tend to be loose with rtw, even if the jacket fits well everywhere else.

3) Are you happy with all the stylistic elements?

Thank you.
1) Yes, I had to do some work on the back of it. Not technically difficult but it requires the judgement of a good fitter and not all alterations tailors have that experience. Ok, maybe few of them do. I manages to get the back just as clean as my own stuff.

2) The armholes and sleeves were stellar. It was one of the reasons I bought it- to study what they did.

3) It's a little longer than I usually wear, but that may help it to look leaner; in the photos of my own stuff, I tend to look stockier than I do in that jacket. I don't normally like 3 roll 2 but this one was nice. I used to cut myself a much more imposing shoulder but liked this one on me so I started to tame things down a bit. Stepping out of my comfort zone every once in a while can help discover new things.

It may be worth noting that the sportcoat is Zegna Couture, made in the same facility as the Tom Ford suits.
post #210 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

Not technically difficult but it requires the judgement of a good fitter and not all alterations tailors have that experience. Ok, maybe few of them do.

I imagine this is always the toughest part, even when I know what I want (at least a mental image of it), it's still very hard to communicate precisely
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