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Antonio Liverano, Florentine tailor - Page 15

post #211 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSNY View Post

Which other tailors in Florence have a house style similar to Liverano? The roundness, lapel roll, open quarters, and absent front darts are all Florentine traits. I have not seen any tailors in Florence with such easily distinguishable roundness and lapel roll compared to Liverano. 

@Leaves
, Sartoria Capelli looks pretty good. One of the jackets on his website has the very Florentine roundness and lapel shape. While they aren't mentioned much on StyeForum their website is translated in several languages including Russian. I am sure they get plenty of business internationally hence the prices. 

03_2016.jpg 

That is a nice coat. For more roundness it could have more of sleeve caps. In other words, not dropping off so quickly from the shoulder. In cutting the lapel the bottom part could have more belly. The breast dart holds it shape better. No breast dart looks cleaner when chest well shaped. An old rule, some tailors liked, not all, the least amount of seams showing the better, that includes the shoulder seam back out of sight. The roll of the lapels at the bottom should be identical. How straight or crooked the coat is cut can be seasonal and climate. After all, hot weather and open quarters is airy. Closed quarters helps keep the heat in when colder. Some is style, fashion or practical. Italian men love colorful garments. American men are afraid of them. Tis a shame the Americans don't have the freedom.
post #212 of 224

I think the shape (not the cloth...) of that orange jacket above is about as perfect as it gets. Sadly, the prices Louis Cappelli quoted were too high for me. Not Liverano level, but not desirable MBT™-prices either.

post #213 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leaves View Post

Take Sartoria Luigi Cappelli as an exemple. Who has ever heard of him on Styleforum?

I did smile.gif
One of the few bespoke tailors visiting Moscow on a constant basis.
post #214 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by greger View Post


That is a nice coat. For more roundness it could have more of sleeve caps. In other words, not dropping off so quickly from the shoulder. In cutting the lapel the bottom part could have more belly. The breast dart holds it shape better. No breast dart looks cleaner when chest well shaped. An old rule, some tailors liked, not all, the least amount of seams showing the better, that includes the shoulder seam back out of sight. The roll of the lapels at the bottom should be identical. How straight or crooked the coat is cut can be seasonal and climate. After all, hot weather and open quarters is airy. Closed quarters helps keep the heat in when colder. Some is style, fashion or practical. Italian men love colorful garments. American men are afraid of them. Tis a shame the Americans don't have the freedom.


I doubt that the red coat is for a Italian customer.

Said this,i like Cappeli much more than Liverano; the lapels are not so large (in true Italian 1950s-60s style),the garnment is clean,the quarter less open but still round.

Is a great single breasted,and .

More,the not frontal darts ( that is a different to "no darts",as in American Ivy league tradition) thing are a very rare feature today,both in Italy and in UK.

post #215 of 224
I have a morbid question, which I will try to ask delicately.

Can this house survive the passing of Mr. Liverano? How much responsibility does the old maestro still bare on his shoulders right now, be it in tailoring or business means. Is there a suitable substitute to lead this house when the time comes?

What percentage of tailoring houses continue to flourish after their founders have passed I wonder? Especially those that don't have family in the business to continue them...
post #216 of 224

Too many years upon his shoulders...

post #217 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by JubeiSpiegel View Post

I have a morbid question, which I will try to ask delicately.

Can this house survive the passing of Mr. Liverano? How much responsibility does the old maestro still bare on his shoulders right now, be it in tailoring or business means. Is there a suitable substitute to lead this house when the time comes?

What percentage of tailoring houses continue to flourish after their founders have passed I wonder? Especially those that don't have family in the business to continue them...

Four ways spring to mind.

A well-known and respected tailoring house can survive the founder's death by:

1. training the founder's child or children in the House Style, and turning the business into a family legacy

2. training a talented non-filial tailor to become the cutter once the founder is no more

3. turning the business into a RTW company that regurgitates the past work and fame of the founder, and markets accordingly

4. a combination of the above

All of these models require, of course, a combination of luck, skill, contacts, "quality" garments and finding and serving a niche.
post #218 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by JubeiSpiegel View Post

I have a morbid question, which I will try to ask delicately.

Can this house survive the passing of Mr. Liverano? How much responsibility does the old maestro still bare on his shoulders right now, be it in tailoring or business means. Is there a suitable substitute to lead this house when the time comes?

What percentage of tailoring houses continue to flourish after their founders have passed I wonder? Especially those that don't have family in the business to continue them...


Well,is difficult to said.

In Italy we have only a case of great tailoring house survived to the death of master,and perpetrated with less or more the same style:

Caraceni.

A part Rubinacci, the Italian tailoring houses system is different by the Saville Row system.

In Saville Row the tailoring houses are firms,in Italy artistic "botteghe".

We have a "maestro" that develops his cut and his style that is individual.

Can be some features in common in a city,but the style of great tailor is individual,his hand is recognizable.

When the Maestro retires or die let learners that are trained in his shop,and that keep on the style...but...

.....but if the learner is mediocre his work will be a pale imitation of the Maestro style,if is capable and fine develops his own personal style.

For exemple the Neapolitan tailor Renato Ciardi is said the heir of great Maestro Angelo Blasi,but the excellent style of Ciardi is different to Blasi cut that was more structurate.

Luigi Cappelli (that is not Florentine but from Puglia and live in Florence only from 1982) had as Maestro the Florentines Vladimiro Mealli and Armando Di Preta,but he have a own style,not the house style of those tailors.

So in Italy is very difficult keep alive a tailoring house after that maestro passed away.

Rubinacci instead work as Anderson & Sheppard or Huntsman:is a   firms (also if a family firm) with a management,and engage cutters.

The style is less or more similiar,but obviously can change a lot with the cutter.


Edited by carpu65 - 2/4/16 at 5:42pm
post #219 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpu65 View Post


I doubt that the red coat is for a Italian customer.
Said this,i like Cappeli much more than Liverano; the lapels are not so large (in true Italian 1950s-60s style),the garnment is clean,the quarter less open but still round.
Is a great single breasted,and .
More,the not frontal darts ( that is a different to "no darts",as in American Ivy league tradition) thing are a very rare feature today,both in Italy and in UK.

The 1890s the business coats were still the body coats. When the lowly lounge and reefers started moving up the ladder the tailors had to figure out how to make it of the higher standard. It was found that the breast darts made it more durable for the work horse it became, which is why darts won out. The darts are not required, they just hold up better. So it is nice to see these coats without them now and then.
post #220 of 224
The way I was told is that each cutter developes his own cut, pretty much, but adapts it to the current trends. There are always exceptions, like A&S. And, times change.
post #221 of 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by greger View Post

The way I was told is that each cutter developes his own cut, pretty much, but adapts it to the current trends. There are always exceptions, like A&S. And, times change.

You have right.

For exemple,today in Naples ( especially foreigners customers) ask for soft cut,spalla camicia and so.

So the tailors fof Neapolitan structurate school (the Blasi School) make they too spalla a camicia,soft interiors...

And is a pity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by greger View Post


The 1890s the business coats were still the body coats. When the lowly lounge and reefers started moving up the ladder the tailors had to figure out how to make it of the higher standard. It was found that the breast darts made it more durable for the work horse it became, which is why darts won out. The darts are not required, they just hold up better. So it is nice to see these coats without them now and then.

Liverano and Cappelli's coats have the darts,but are slanted darts,diagonals from the pockets to the armpit.

Is a type of dart clean and pleasent,i agree.

post #222 of 224
Carpu65,
"Liverano and Cappelli's coats have the darts, but are slanted darts, diagonals from the pockets to the armpit.
Is a type of dart clean and pleasent, I agree."

Believe one of my granddads coats was cut this way. He spoke of the competition for bringing these coats up to meet the new standard for them. Regional and individual competition. The lowly lounge put tailors imagination to work. Maybe it would be like trying to make a snowboarder coat into a business coat?
post #223 of 224

Liverano (and Cappelli) look is very close to the Italian look of 1950s,that had in Florence many great exponents (Nativo,Rettori,Speciale,Di Preta,Rossella,Giuntini,Maltagliati the young,De Vita,Franchi).

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by carpu65 - 2/16/16 at 5:58pm
post #224 of 224

Does he always do extended shoulders? It kinda intensifies the overall silhouette of the jacket.

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