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Antonio Liverano, Florentine tailor - Page 2

post #16 of 106
I like the look and I think it is best for patterned cloth (particularly checks) given the absence of a front dart.
post #17 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


I wasn't implementing my own definition, just using what "clean" typically means in tailoring. Anyway, you are right, moving the darts to the sides definitely effects a uniquely uninterrupted front. I think the downside is that you get less shaping along the front-rear axis that way.

 

Well, I guess that's part of the reason I like it so much.  There's almost a completely uninterrupted front with, in my opinion, quite a large amount of shape in the jackets due to the rounded quarters and what I'm assuming are his ironing skills.  Plus, after seeing his garments in person, I was really impressed with the fineness of the stitching and it's simplicity/rustic-ness.

post #18 of 106
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

I dunno, Unbel--seems pretty matchy to me.

Well, one can decide for themselves whether they like it or not. I'm just pointing out, it's a definite element of his style. A couple other examples:

http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m7jt3exSit1qad1efo1_1280.jpg
http://24.media.tumblr.com/9f4a451510b107dfed9964b125a7bd36/tumblr_mk6w0w8MIp1rs6tsao1_500.jpg

although he doesn't always dress this way:

http://www.consueloblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/DSC07587.jpg
post #19 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


Good or bad, would you agree with my description?

 

Yes, I think yoiu're on point there.
post #20 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

A friend of mine described the silhouette once as something like what the idle rich would wear in the mid-century. Something you'd wear while sitting at cafes all day smoking cigars and eating food. I thought it was an amusing comment, and though I've never seen that distinctive style in old photos, the spirit and sensibility does seem there.

RJMan in his great ASW post on Camps de Luca mentioned that Camps no longer often cuts in their midcentury style, due to customer preference for lighter cloths that make the old shoulder difficult to engineer.

But L&L, still working in heavier cloths, seems to bear some relation to midcentury Camps, as worn by Lino Ventura and Jean Gabin in Touchez pas au Grisbi (1954) here:

post #21 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhilla View Post


tumblr_lztv18OEOp1qad1efo1_1280.jpg


tumblr_lwuegdPzwm1qad1efo1_1280.jpg

These seem much nicer to me than any of the other jackets of his I've seen.
post #22 of 106
Quote:Originally Posted by jhilla View Post

 

As I don't have nearly enough experience with bespoke clothing I won't speak to the reason.  What I will say is that it creates an incredibly clean jacket and it's one of the biggest reasons that I love his cut.  Not only has the dart been moved to the side, it's also angled a few centimeters forward to mimic the line of the wearer's arm, pitched slightly. As a result, when you have your arms to the side, your sleeve covers that dart and the only break in symmetry in the entire jacket is the back side vents.  In fact, if you do a quick Google search for Liverano jackets, you'll notice how difficult it is to even spot the dart.  Here is a clear picture from Ethan's Tumblr.

 

tumblr_lztv18OEOp1qad1efo1_1280.jpg

 

 

Wow...this Ethan fellow has certainly lost a lot of weight.

 

He always looked great and has perfect style..He looks great! Good for him!

 

Hope some of these rude comments I have seen here and there around  in the past did not get to him, but this stuff really makes you want to be your best.

 

Taking care of your body well goes hand in hand with all of this.

 

Best wishes to them So young, and they have great taste and style those guys.

 

Thank you for the article. Helps put a fire under me to finally go and visit after all this time!

 

Kind regards

post #23 of 106
It's a great shop (they are always warm and welcoming) and they have a wonderful selection of tweeds that you'll be hard pressed to find elsewhere.

Not a fan of the house cut but that overcoat is really great.

BTW nice post
post #24 of 106

Nice to hear...one would imagine as much. One can see it within the photos that he is a genuine and unpretentious fellow. nice thing about Italy generally.

 

oi oi...tweeds..sigh ..going to be a dangerous visit I see. I know many are very passionate about it, but they've only recently become my latest *thing*.

 

Regards

post #25 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

In all, I'd say it's the closest thing to an Italian Anderson & Sheppard. It is different from Rubinacci in a few key respects: (1) Rubinacci does not to draw the shoulder lines out as far (thereby affecting the sleeve shape as well), (2) Liverano cuts much more rounded quarters (but then, Liverano's are rounder than pretty much anybody else's, (3) the sleeveheads are completely different, and (4) most significantly, the shoulder lines are straightened out by some means, not left to mould naturally to the wearer (notice there is no curvature).

 

Trying to complement the analysis on the Liverano's house style.

Aparently, there're two shoulder lines in the house style: the straight line, that Foo was speaking of, and the natural line. However, both seems to be extended. As evidence, I give you the following photographs, which presents both shoulders lines.

The use is counterintuitive, the straight line seems to be applied to the slim guy and the curvy to the fuller guy.

 

post #26 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor Elfo View Post

 

Trying to complement the analysis on the Liverano's house style.

Aparently, there're two shoulder lines in the house style: the straight line, that Foo was speaking of, and the natural line. However, both seems to be extended. As evidence, I give you the following photographs, which presents both shoulders lines.

The use is counterintuitive, the straight line seems to be applied to the slim guy and the curvy to the fuller guy.

 

 

Hm, I think Ethan has lost some weight lately, I don't like the fit of his jacket here at all. His Liverano stuff looked a lot better before.

post #27 of 106

The one point that always strikes me about their jackets is the general roundness. However, there's still, for me, the question about the shoulder lines. Maomao's jacket bellow negates the logic that I proposed (straight for slim guys and round for fuller). So, there's a logic behind the tailor's choice? Customer request (I remember that Maomao's stated that he asked for no padding on this particular jacket)? The purpose of the jacket (round shoulder for "casual" and straight for "formal")? In my opinion, it's a combination of those.

 

 

post #28 of 106
X-post:

Picked up my first jacket in Florence last week, as well as a couple of odd pants. Jacket fabric is a green-brownish Harris tweed. Ordered in January, fittings in Jan and Feb.
Pants are in cream flannel and dark olive cotton.




Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)












Fit pics to follow later on once tweed season kicks in here in Sweden... not too far away I'm afraid...

I also had fittings for a mid grey suit and a mid blue jacket.

My impressions with Liverano:
They are a true pleasure to work with, and extremely professional. There are never any misunderstandings or forgotten details whatsoever. Both Antonio and Taka have very good memories and remember all requests, no matter how small. I speak Japanese so maybe this makes things easier, although Taka's English is not bad, certainly comparing to other artisans in Italy. So far, what is most impressive to me, is how consistent the fit seems to be, even between different fabrics. The three jackets I have ordered so far fit exactly the same at the forward fitting stage. This is not my experience with NSM for example. Probably, this comes down to L&L working with only a few artisans in their own workshop, and of course to Antonio cutting all garments by himself.

Fabric selection is great as well, with a lot of unusual stuff you don't find in the regualr books. House style is not to everyones taste, but I happen to love it. Basically, I leave all details and decisions to Taka and Antonio, since I happen to like their taste and fully trust their judgement. Their house style is what they do, and they would be very hard to convince to do something other than that I believe.

Moreover, the shop is very nice and I never feel rushed, even if they have other customers coming in. I have spent whole days there chit-chatting with Taka and Antonio and looking through fabrics, the RTW collection, and the workshop behind the store.

Needless to say, I'm totally hooked. Expensive, yes, but oh so good! Going back to Florence next in Sep-Oct biggrin.gif
post #29 of 106
How many fittings/weeks to get final results (which are very striking, BTW)?
post #30 of 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Concordia View Post

How many fittings/weeks to get final results (which are very striking, BTW)?

Thanks. For the first commission they normally have two fittings, and for consecutive commissions usually one will do. I had my measurements taken beginning of January, first fitting that same week and then next fitting in mid Feb. I don't know how quick they can make the whole process, for me it was depending on my Florence trip schedule.
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