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Is There Any Reason Why I Should Turn Down a Google Job?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Seriously.

I'm a 23 year old security engineer from the DC area (spent my whole life here) and was offered an entry level position with a twenty-six month contract. It feels a bit like a step backwards while also providing an opportunity to jump five steps forward. I would have to move to the Bay Area AND take a $10k pay cut - the two worst parts of this plan. On the flip side I'm eligible for two performance bonuses during the duration of my employment (up to 31% of base pay) and unlike my current job (where I've put in multiple 10+ hour days) I'm eligible for overtime. I'm probably forgetting some other useful details but this is the general gist of it.
post #2 of 20
Yes is the only answer here. Shit will change your life.
post #3 of 20
I read this when it was first published.

http://techcrunch.com/2009/01/18/why-google-employees-quit/
post #4 of 20

You seem to be a hard worker, and also want to move up, for both these reason's I'd say no.

 

based on what my friends tell me. But I suppose the grass is greener on the other side?

post #5 of 20

Do you REALLY think that it can move you 5 steps forward, or are you just saying what you think other people will say? If you have a career goal that the job will help you reach faster than your current job and you're willing to move, then I don't see why you wouldn't take it. The combination of overtime and bonus will probably more than make up for the $10K less in base salary.

post #6 of 20
In Silicon Valley Google is considered a great place to work.
I've lived in the DC Area decades ago when I worked for the Federal Gov't.
I would say that the Bay Area is superior except for two factors:

1. The cost of housing near Google is much higher than DC ( which is not cheap)

2. DC is in the East Coast megalopolis- You can get to civilized places like New York, Boston,
Blue Ridge Mountains, The Hamptons, The Cape(Cod), North Carolina Beaches, Vermont,
etc. by car, train or short flight. DIstances are much greater in the West though we have many beautiful
places within less than a days drive from the Google Area. The only Western City other than San Francisco with major urban attractions is LA. San Diego, Seattle, Vancouver, etc have their charms but do not make the cut in my book.

Being in Silicon Valley and with Google on your resume opens up extraordinary opportunities for computer professionals. There is a reason it attracts computer people form all over the world. I am acquainted with several Senior Google people who joined the firm pre IPO. They are uniformly very rich. But the fact they still work there- some of them don't have to work at all, attests to the fact that it remains a great place to work.

Good luck in your decision.
Edited by comrade - 4/16/13 at 11:56pm
post #7 of 20
Duplicate Post.
The Bug Lives!!
post #8 of 20

Sure there are reasons. To me the crux would be whether you want to live in the Bay Area or not. If you want to, this is your opportunity: do it. If moving to the West Coast is a con--and it seems that way from your post--then I would definitely not do it.

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post

I read this when it was first published.

http://techcrunch.com/2009/01/18/why-google-employees-quit/

I've been reading that since I was told I was approved by the hiring committee - I don't anticipate to be there for 10+ years but definitely gives me something to think about.
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinnyMac View Post

Do you REALLY think that it can move you 5 steps forward, or are you just saying what you think other people will say? If you have a career goal that the job will help you reach faster than your current job and you're willing to move, then I don't see why you wouldn't take it. The combination of overtime and bonus will probably more than make up for the $10K less in base salary.

I don't really think it will move me five steps forward but I do think it will be an invaluable opportunity to work with some of the top security professionals in the world. It'll give me an opportunity to broaden my experience outside of federal IT security.

Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

In Silicon Valley Google is considered a great place to work.
I've lived in the DC Area decades ago when I worked for the Federal Gov't.
I would say that the Bay Area is superior except for two factors:

1. The cost of housing near Google is much higher than DC ( which is not cheap)

2. DC is in the East Coast megalopolis- You can get to civilized places like New York, Boston,
Blue Ridge Mountains, The Hamptons, The Cape(Cod), North Carolina Beaches, Vermont,
etc. by car, train or short flight. DIstances are much greater in the West though we have many beautiful
places within less than a days drive from the Google Area. The only Western City other than San Francisco with major urban attractions is LA. San Diego, Seattle, Vancouver, etc have their charms but do not make the cut in my book.

Being in Silicon Valley and with Google on your resume opens up extraordinary opportunities for computer professionals. There is a reason it attracts computer people form all over the world. I am acquainted with several Senior Google people who joined the firm pre IPO. They are uniformly very rich. But the fact they still work there- some of them don't have to work at all, attests to the fact that it remains a great place to work.

Good luck in your decision.

Thanks, this kind of corroborates everything I've heard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Rural Juror View Post

Sure there are reasons. To me the crux would be whether you want to live in the Bay Area or not. If you want to, this is your opportunity: do it. If moving to the West Coast is a con--and it seems that way from your post--then I would definitely not do it.

My only problem with moving out west is the cost of living. Other than that I'm pretty set on getting out of DC.
post #10 of 20
I have a friend working for them and he's doing very well, he's in his dream job, doing and making what top MBA grads yearn for without one (though he has a Masters). Plus he lives in a fun Euro city. From your description, however, it doesn't seem like you're in his field or you're even particularly excited about the opportunity. In that case I would say no. However, you are eligible for bonuses and overtime. However, you will have to move. What would you do after the contract is up? You don't make it sound very compelling...
post #11 of 20
Do not hesitate. Take it. Having google on your résumé will pay for the next 20 years.
post #12 of 20
post #13 of 20
No, Silicon valley is filled with cretins who think "the internet" will solve world problems, if you're halfway decent you'll go postal. How insignificant will you feel working for a fucking search engine along vegan bike fanatics who think Gamification of life is like, amazing and take pictures of their meals.
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joffrey View Post

I have a friend working for them and he's doing very well, he's in his dream job, doing and making what top MBA grads yearn for without one (though he has a Masters). Plus he lives in a fun Euro city. From your description, however, it doesn't seem like you're in his field or you're even particularly excited about the opportunity. In that case I would say no. However, you are eligible for bonuses and overtime. However, you will have to move. What would you do after the contract is up? You don't make it sound very compelling...

Most people stay on with the company at various roles, most tend to be operations engineers although a few (who know what they want to do) end up in better positions. A good number of people end up jumping to competitors or joining startups.

I'm actually really excited about the opportunity, not entirely excited about moving to an area with a higher COL than DC while taking a paycut.
post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blog Marley View Post


Most people stay on with the company at various roles, most tend to be operations engineers although a few (who know what they want to do) end up in better positions. A good number of people end up jumping to competitors or joining startups.

I'm actually really excited about the opportunity, not entirely excited about moving to an area with a higher COL than DC while taking a paycut.

Have you tried negotiating payment/perks? Are they going to help you with moving expenses?

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