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Tailor pulling my leg??

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Hi All

 

Hoping some of you with more bespoke tailoring than me can help me with my question.

 

I am currently trying out a new tailor and I recently went to my first fitting and was asking him some questions about his process. He was mentioning that he does use glue for certain parts of the suit (believe he said around the buttons) Was telling me most people do this - is this standard? 

 

That being said will post pics of the suit when done!

 

Thanks for the help

post #2 of 20
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post #3 of 20

LOL! "Most people do this" isn't a good justification. Most people dress like shxt too. Most designers make low quality suits. Unless you're hoping to get what most people get, I wouldn't just gloss over that point.

 

Going to a tailor shop doesn't mean that you'll get a hand-made, fully-canvassed suit.

post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by philjoe View Post

Hi All

Hoping some of you with more bespoke tailoring than me can help me with my question.

I am currently trying out a new tailor and I recently went to my first fitting and was asking him some questions about his process. He was mentioning that he does use glue for certain parts of the suit (believe he said around the buttons) Was telling me most people do this - is this standard? 

That being said will post pics of the suit when done!

Thanks for the help

"most people do this" is neither true nor a justification. He is trying to sell you a second rate garment because he is unable or unwilling to to do the job properly.


Assuming that you checked on this idle second rate method of working before placing your order, walk away and find a decent tailor.
post #5 of 20
He might have meant the buttonholes. It is a common trick, even on Savile Row (and thus not some "idle second rate method of working") to stay buttonholes (before sewing them) with an adhesive of sorts, particularly on cloth that frays easily. If you are concerned, ask him for a clarification.
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

He might have meant the buttonholes. It is a common trick, even on Savile Row (and thus not some "idle second rate method of working") to stay buttonholes (before sewing them) with an adhesive of sorts, particularly on cloth that frays easily. If you are concerned, ask him for a clarification.

 

Ah I will ask him for clarification this weekend

 

Thanks for the help!

post #7 of 20
There's also usually a piece of linen or silesia used to reinforce the button areas, and its possible he might be using a piece of fusible here rather than sewing it to the canvas. Tbh there's very little wrong with using fusible in a few select places, such as here and behind pocket openings, as long as the main structure of the coat is floating canvas.
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum View Post

There's also usually a piece of linen or silesia used to reinforce the button areas, and its possible he might be using a piece of fusible here rather than sewing it to the canvas. Tbh there's very little wrong with using fusible in a few select places, such as here and behind pocket openings, as long as the main structure of the coat is floating canvas.

You're too kind to him.
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by GBR View Post

"most people do this" is neither true nor a justification. He is trying to sell you a second rate garment because he is unable or unwilling to to do the job properly.


Assuming that you checked on this idle second rate method of working before placing your order, walk away and find a decent tailor.

Here is evidence that the following hucksters are selling "second rate garments who are unable or unwilling to do the job properly". By GBR's estimation.

Gieves & Hawkes



Fallan & Harvey



Caraceni


Welsh & Jefferies





Steed Savile Row



People would be far better served if many on this forum would avoid jumping to hasty conclusions and issuing condemnations based on things of which they have little understanding.
post #10 of 20
it adds a little stability to lightweight fabrics.
it does not reduce the quality of the garment
post #11 of 20
Leaving aside the question of whether some fusible actually results in an inferior garment (the experts have already settled that issue), I marvel at how this forum's obsession with full floating canvas construction on a jacket has somehow caused people to assume that no fusible should be used anywhere on any garment, without regard for context or pricepoint. To suggest that any "shortcut" (and really, aren't "shortcuts" or compromises from the ideal inherent in anything short of fully hand-made, bespoke from a world-renowned maker) somehow results in a garment of unacceptable quality seems extreme to me.
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

Here is evidence that the following hucksters are selling "second rate garments who are unable or unwilling to do the job properly". By GBR's estimation.

Gieves & Hawkes



Fallan & Harvey



Caraceni


Welsh & Jefferies





Steed Savile Row



People would be far better served if many on this forum would avoid jumping to hasty conclusions and issuing condemnations based on things of which they have little understanding.

Amen
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

People would be far better served if many on this forum would avoid jumping to hasty conclusions and issuing condemnations based on things of which they have little understanding.

+1
post #14 of 20
Vinny Mac is emailing Gieves right now.
post #15 of 20
I'm messaging my Jeeves, right now. He is late with my high tea. And, hopefully, not ruining my suits.

Jefferyd, you are throwing many a large stick into the spokes of bicycles passing by.

So, does any tailor not do this? Perhaps we should start from that end since it would seem shorter.

Honestly, I cannot even tell what I am looking at in the Caraceni pic. Carnage.

Given their prices, ouch.

Also, jefferyd, I just checked your blog out(had done so before but not for some time) and sorry about your hand.
It is possible for the feeling to come back after a very extended period. I do not want to give you false hope but 6 months is not the end of the
opening. Experience has had it at years even to a 90/95% regeneration of 'normal' feeling. Nerves are a wild bunch in so many ways.


When are you taking apart a few more 5k suits?


My butler wants to open Jeeves & Hawks. Absolutely NO glue anywhere. Even in the building.
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