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J FitzPatrick Appreciation Thread - Page 61

post #901 of 1240
Quote:
Originally Posted by kasper007 View Post

Perhaps ruin is too strong a word, but I still see putting a topy on a nice pair of leather shoes as the equivalent to buying a designer couch and putting plastic covers to protect the leather. I get the traction thing (leather sole are really slippery) though.
 

 

I could be wrong, but I think that the "Topy stops the shoe from breathing" argument has been pretty well disproven. The shoe loses far, far, far more moisture through the innersole and up through the shoe than it does through the bottom of the sole. If your shoes get wet and you are worried about mould, then stuff them with newspaper and place them somewhere reasonably warm and dry and they will be fine.

 

I understand what you mean about putting Topy on the soles of good shoes, and putting a cover over a couch, but there's a big difference in that hardly anyone sees the bottom of your shoes, whereas everyone who comes to visit you will see your couch. Ultimately, you are the only person who will notice that you have put Topy on your shoes - no-one else will know. Also, a cover on a couch can seriously impair the comfort factor of the couch, whereas Topy soles don't affect the comfort of your shoes (well, not in my experience, anyway).

 

Perhaps it might be ideal to not apply Topy to soles but as someone said up above, if it comes to applying Topy soles for $30 every couple of years, or having to send your shoes back to the UK to have them re-soled for $300 or more every few years, I know what I'd rather do...

post #902 of 1240
The Tony II in Dark Brown Museum Calf now in stock

http://www.jfitzpatrickfootwear.com/collections/oxford/products/tony-ii-dark-brown-museum-calf





post #903 of 1240
Just picked up my first pair of J Fitz's on Friday. Had no idea you guys are AVs!

Looking forward to receiving my new shoes. cheers.gif
post #904 of 1240
My dark brown museum calf Magnolias from Massdrop is taking longer than expected to arrive...

Anyway not sure if this has been asked, but how does one wax and polish museum calf, with its marbling effect? Should we use a lighter or darker shade of polish?
post #905 of 1240

Now that I'm 6 pairs in, I think it's only fair that I write J. FitzPatrick Footwear a review. If 6 pairs isn't a clear "endorsement" then I'm not sure what is! Apologies in advance for the many photos to come.

 

Anyway, I first met Justin a little under a year ago at Leffot for his trunk show. I can safely say this was my plunge into the world of high-end shoes. For those of you that don't know, Justin packed up his life to move to Florence, where he trained under the late Stefano Bemer making bespoke shoes and learning the craft. From there he went to Gieves and Hawkes as an artisanal shoe shiner, while launching his brand of shoe care products and designing his shoes. His shoes are made in Spain by what appears to be a pretty good factory. 

 

What attracted me to his shoes were the mixed materials and patterns used. There were some models that I don't think I would personally wear, but others I instantly fell in love with. The first shoe I bought from him is the Wallingford. This was all before I had a reasonable understanding of what makes a good shoe in terms of leather, construction, components, etc.

 

Nonetheless, the leathers are sourced from some really good tanneries, like suede from C.F. Stead, museum calf from Ilcea, and others from Annonay. In all of my 6 pairs, I have never seen a single pair with a flaw in the leather, and not a single one has had excessive creasing. He uses good cuts of the leather and it's clearly visible. 

 

But above all that, and what I think Justin needs to emphasize more with his photos, is the shape of his lasts. His round toe lasts in particular are fantastic with a nice form-fitting shape. As I said earlier, Justin trained with Bemer, and there's some clear similarities with Justin's JKF last and some of Bemer's lasts. The photos below show a strong resemblance. This is very hard to find from a brand that prices shoes at less than $400 with the present currency exchange.

 

Bemer RTW:

 

 

 

Justin's Wallingford: 

 

 

 

This patina is present after 40+ wears, but probably accelerated by my then unknowing overuse of cream polish and Renovateur. Sorry for getting the creams and wax onto the suede! Still need to figure how to get that out...But continuing on about his lasts, they're shaped really nicely, which is pretty hard to get from shoes priced so competitively. A few more photos below showing the lasts getting the love they deserve. 

 

These two Magnolia Oxfords are F-width on the classic round-toed TMG last. They maintain the elegant shape and curves that are even more accentuated with his E width lasts. 

 

 

 

The curves are again visible on my MTO boots in F width, this time on the soft-chiseled LPB last. 

 

 

One thing I've noticed with the lasts from high-end makers like GG, Bemer, Bestetti, etc., is the lacing actually leans off and to the forefoot side on each respective foot. While Justin's last do not present this as dramatically as the previously named makers, they certainly have it to a reasonable degree, which provide a much more elegant look of the shoe. 

 

More photos showing the last shape, the Wallingford (JKF) and the Wedgewood (TMG) are both E width (This was before I realized I had wide feet and am actually a UK7F, not 7.5E) 

 

 

 

Some other makers use lats that have a flat progression from the vamp to toe, and others even bulge back up a little towards the toe. I personally love how Justin's lasts continue to slope downward from the vamp all the way to the toe. This is just my personal preference, as I think it adds to a sense of refinement, "sleekness," and elegance to a shoe. This is shown particularly well in the photos of the Wallingford oxford and the Wedgewood boots, but also shown on my MTO boots on the soft-chiseled LPB last. 

 

 

 

Another detail about his lasts that need to be emphasized are the heel cup. The photo here shows the nice shape it holds, after already having molded to my foot reasonably well and losing some of its curvaceousness. This sort of shape is tough to find on shoes in this price range. 

 

 

 

We can talk about leather quality until the cows come home, considering pretty much every Joe Schmoe brand says they use really good leather, sourcing from the same tanneries as the big guys. While this may be true and I'm confident Justin uses really good leather, his shoes are a step above the rest in the lasts and patterns. They patterns are well suited to the lasts, with lines and brogues of the oxford meeting certain "turning points" of curvature on a given last. Overall, just very well balanced and complement the designs of the shoes well.

 

For less than $400 right now, these are some of the best valued shoes I can think of. Other details like the closed channel stitching and slightly beveled waist on the sole are indicative of handwork and craftsmanship that is uncommon on shoes in this price range. Further, his soles are bark tanned and the ones I've left un-topy'd have held up extremely well. Might need toe-taps because I'm a weird walker with weird feet. 

 

Now for a bit of criticism...I'd like to see some fudge wheel work on the welt. This extra decoration (when done well) adds a little bit more class and elegance to a shoe. Further, a slight Cuban heel (where it becomes narrower the further down you go) would be a fantastic addition. I know Justin has made improvements to his shoes in terms of components over the past few years, and I hope his sales volume reach a point where he can add these two details to really separate himself from the boys. While the shoes already beat those priced in the $500-$700 range (I'm looking at you, C&J and Alden), they're priced significantly lower. 

 

If you have "normal" feet (whatever the heck that means), there's no reason why you shouldn't try a pair of JFF shoes. Justin is a great guy, and more importantly he's accessible to his customers, which is really valuable. Lastly, for those of us in the US, the minimum customs price to be taxed on is now $800, and Justin offers free shipping to the US on his shoes.  

 

If you're looking for your next pair of dress shoes, or want something with some mixed material and a little more pizazz, definitely give JFF a look and reach out to Justin. 

post #906 of 1240
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Now that I'm 6 pairs in, I think it's only fair that I write J. FitzPatrick Footwear a review. If 6 pairs isn't a clear "endorsement" then I'm not sure what is! Apologies in advance for the many photos to come.

Anyway, I first met Justin a little under a year ago at Leffot for his trunk show. I can safely say this was my plunge into the world of high-end shoes. For those of you that don't know, Justin packed up his life to move to Florence, where he trained under the late Stefano Bemer making bespoke shoes and learning the craft. From there he went to Gieves and Hawkes as an artisanal shoe shiner, while launching his brand of shoe care products and designing his shoes. His shoes are made in Spain by what appears to be a pretty good factory. 

What attracted me to his shoes were the mixed materials and patterns used. There were some models that I don't think I would personally wear, but others I instantly fell in love with. The first shoe I bought from him is the Wallingford. This was all before I had a reasonable understanding of what makes a good shoe in terms of leather, construction, components, etc.

Nonetheless, the leathers are sourced from some really good tanneries, like suede from C.F. Stead, museum calf from Ilcea, and others from Annonay. In all of my 6 pairs, I have never seen a single pair with a flaw in the leather, and not a single one has had excessive creasing. He uses good cuts of the leather and it's clearly visible. 

But above all that, and what I think Justin needs to emphasize more with his photos, is the shape of his lasts. His round toe lasts in particular are fantastic with a nice form-fitting shape. As I said earlier, Justin trained with Bemer, and there's some clear similarities with Justin's JKF last and some of Bemer's lasts. The photos below show a strong resemblance. This is very hard to find from a brand that prices shoes at less than $400 with the present currency exchange.

If you're looking for your next pair of dress shoes, or want something with some mixed material and a little more pizazz, definitely give JFF a look and reach out to Justin. 

Thanks for that kind write up Rohit. I am glad that you are enjoying the shoes!
post #907 of 1240
post #908 of 1240
Tony II in black arrived. Have not tried on yet, but super impressed with the quality of the leather and the workmanship.
post #909 of 1240
Green Rainiers in the flesh. Very comfortable out of the box, just like my Wedgwoods. Looking forward to adding plenty more JFP to the collection.



post #910 of 1240
Burgundy magnolia from MassDrop!

post #911 of 1240
Our driving loafer re-stock just came in as well as a few new colorways in both the string and penny loafers

http://www.jfitzpatrickfootwear.com/collections/driving-loafers





post #912 of 1240
I'm utterly confused, something just doesn't add up. What am I missing? Are all of those stock photos of shoes you happen to own?

You just happened to go to leffot a year ago and now are six pairs in? What about all the other brands you saw that day? I'm curious how they compare.

And the whole CJ or Alden vs this brand is complete deja vu. Didn't someone else say something similar a year ago or so? Maybe it was this poster.

But it confuses me because why are those two of all brands the ones I've now seen twice being compared? Wouldn't Mezlan or Magnanni be a better comparison since Made In Spain?

Or if looking to US maybe Allen Edmonds? Or if looking to UK maybe one of the many up and coming yet nowhere near the level of Crockett and Jones brands?

That comparison confuses me hence the comment. Just like the whole thread from a random fanboy confuses me hence the post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Now that I'm 6 pairs in, I think it's only fair that I write J. FitzPatrick Footwear a review. If 6 pairs isn't a clear "endorsement" then I'm not sure what is! Apologies in advance for the many photos to come.

Anyway, I first met Justin a little under a year ago at Leffot for his trunk show. I can safely say this was my plunge into the world of high-end shoes. For those of you that don't know, Justin packed up his life to move to Florence, where he trained under the late Stefano Bemer making bespoke shoes and learning the craft. From there he went to Gieves and Hawkes as an artisanal shoe shiner, while launching his brand of shoe care products and designing his shoes. His shoes are made in Spain by what appears to be a pretty good factory. 

What attracted me to his shoes were the mixed materials and patterns used. There were some models that I don't think I would personally wear, but others I instantly fell in love with. The first shoe I bought from him is the Wallingford. This was all before I had a reasonable understanding of what makes a good shoe in terms of leather, construction, components, etc.

Nonetheless, the leathers are sourced from some really good tanneries, like suede from C.F. Stead, museum calf from Ilcea, and others from Annonay. In all of my 6 pairs, I have never seen a single pair with a flaw in the leather, and not a single one has had excessive creasing. He uses good cuts of the leather and it's clearly visible. 

But above all that, and what I think Justin needs to emphasize more with his photos, is the shape of his lasts. His round toe lasts in particular are fantastic with a nice form-fitting shape. As I said earlier, Justin trained with Bemer, and there's some clear similarities with Justin's JKF last and some of Bemer's lasts. The photos below show a strong resemblance. This is very hard to find from a brand that prices shoes at less than $400 with the present currency exchange.

Bemer RTW:







Justin's Wallingford: 







This patina is present after 40+ wears, but probably accelerated by my then unknowing overuse of cream polish and Renovateur. Sorry for getting the creams and wax onto the suede! Still need to figure how to get that out...But continuing on about his lasts, they're shaped really nicely, which is pretty hard to get from shoes priced so competitively. A few more photos below showing the lasts getting the love they deserve. 

These two Magnolia Oxfords are F-width on the classic round-toed TMG last. They maintain the elegant shape and curves that are even more accentuated with his E width lasts. 







The curves are again visible on my MTO boots in F width, this time on the soft-chiseled LPB last. 




One thing I've noticed with the lasts from high-end makers like GG, Bemer, Bestetti, etc., is the lacing actually leans off and to the forefoot side on each respective foot. While Justin's last do not present this as dramatically as the previously named makers, they certainly have it to a reasonable degree, which provide a much more elegant look of the shoe. 

More photos showing the last shape, the Wallingford (JKF) and the Wedgewood (TMG) are both E width (This was before I realized I had wide feet and am actually a UK7F, not 7.5E) 







Some other makers use lats that have a flat progression from the vamp to toe, and others even bulge back up a little towards the toe. I personally love how Justin's lasts continue to slope downward from the vamp all the way to the toe. This is just my personal preference, as I think it adds to a sense of refinement, "sleekness," and elegance to a shoe. This is shown particularly well in the photos of the Wallingford oxford and the Wedgewood boots, but also shown on my MTO boots on the soft-chiseled LPB last. 





Another detail about his lasts that need to be emphasized are the heel cup. The photo here shows the nice shape it holds, after already having molded to my foot reasonably well and losing some of its curvaceousness. This sort of shape is tough to find on shoes in this price range. 





We can talk about leather quality until the cows come home, considering pretty much every Joe Schmoe brand says they use really good leather, sourcing from the same tanneries as the big guys. While this may be true and I'm confident Justin uses really good leather, his shoes are a step above the rest in the lasts and patterns. They patterns are well suited to the lasts, with lines and brogues of the oxford meeting certain "turning points" of curvature on a given last. Overall, just very well balanced and complement the designs of the shoes well.

For less than $400 right now, these are some of the best valued shoes I can think of. Other details like the closed channel stitching and slightly beveled waist on the sole are indicative of handwork and craftsmanship that is uncommon on shoes in this price range. Further, his soles are bark tanned and the ones I've left un-topy'd have held up extremely well. Might need toe-taps because I'm a weird walker with weird feet. 

Now for a bit of criticism...I'd like to see some fudge wheel work on the welt. This extra decoration (when done well) adds a little bit more class and elegance to a shoe. Further, a slight Cuban heel (where it becomes narrower the further down you go) would be a fantastic addition. I know Justin has made improvements to his shoes in terms of components over the past few years, and I hope his sales volume reach a point where he can add these two details to really separate himself from the boys. While the shoes already beat those priced in the $500-$700 range (I'm looking at you, C&J and Alden), they're priced significantly lower. 

If you have "normal" feet (whatever the heck that means), there's no reason why you shouldn't try a pair of JFF shoes. Justin is a great guy, and more importantly he's accessible to his customers, which is really valuable. Lastly, for those of us in the US, the minimum customs price to be taxed on is now $800, and Justin offers free shipping to the US on his shoes.  

If you're looking for your next pair of dress shoes, or want something with some mixed material and a little more pizazz, definitely give JFF a look and reach out to Justin. 
post #913 of 1240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post


Ok pal, I'll bite.

These are photos I took myself of my own shoes other than the Bemer. If you think they're stock photos, I'll take that as a compliment.

Yes I did happen to see Justin at Leffot a year ago. Leffot stocks many brands, but certainly GG, Lobb, EG, and Corthay are a tier above the rest. Leffot also stocks Alden, where I saw open channel stitching, sloppy broguing, poor pattern cutting or lasting (meaning the medallion wasn't centered), bulbous lasts, and a price tag that didn't make sense.

Why are the two brands (C&J and Alden) often compared? Because many people are familiar with their price and quality.

The poster some time back was mw313, who you also replied to with your standard snarky commentary.

If your argument that country of manufacturing should be the only comparison, let's just stop comparing Saint Crispin or Vass with the usual suspects, since their from Romania and Hungary respectively. Since you've mentioned AE, JFF blows them out of the water and then some. It's not even close.

Tell me beachbum, in your superior opinion, how is C&J better than JFF? Because they charge $800 for a standard cap toe shoe and they're made in England? Does country of manufacture inherently imply quality? Just ask Vass, Saint Crispin, Carmina, Bontoni, and a bunch of other quality makers.

So beachBUM, other than your bum-opinion and comments, enlighten all of us explicitly how C&J quality I s superior to JFF in anything other than price.

Bum can mean a homeless or lazy person, but it can also mean butt or ass. Maybe that's what you are, a beach ass. Wet, sandy, salty, and irritating.
post #914 of 1240
Enjoying my Leschi loafers. Thanks Justin.

post #915 of 1240
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Bum can mean a homeless or lazy person, but it can also mean butt or ass. Maybe that's what you are, a beach ass. Wet, sandy, salty, and irritating.

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