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Men's Hats: A Discussion Thread, Questions, Opinions, Suggestions... - Page 29

post #421 of 530
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post

Will of A Suitable Wardrobe has a lot of interesting things to say about hats. Here is just one of his columns:

http://asuitablewardrobe.dynend.com/2011/05/time-for-straw-hats-once-again.html


EDIT: Nevermind
post #422 of 530

Hi,

Do you guys think you can id what Andrew Bird is wearing in this video?

http://www.esquire.com/blogs/culture/andrew-bird-tift-merritt-live-session

I can't tell if it's a distressed fedora or maybe a tyrolean hat.

Thanks a lot!

post #423 of 530
Looks like a well worn trilby.
post #424 of 530

Hello Hat thread!  I've only worn "caps" in the past but want to step up to a Homburg.  I guess as a "Rookie" in this world I wanted to see what you folks thought of this Hat as my first?  It's a Biltmore Oxford Eleganza from a local hat place in Chicago.  I don't know if thats a decent brand for a starter or if thats like the Cole Haan of hats but I like the way it looks. 

 

http://www.hats-plus.com/p-516-biltmore-oxford-eleganza-homburg-hat.aspx

post #425 of 530
Homburgs are tough to pull off. It's a very assertive, formal style. You'd probably be better off starting with a fedora with moderate proportions until you get used to wearing a hat. You could do a porkpie if you want something a little more unusual but still not as flamboyant as a homburg.

Since you're in Chicago, get yourself down to Hats Plus in Portage Park. You can try on a wide variety of crown and brim sizes, and get the guys in the shop to advise you if you're unsure what works best with your head and face. Graham Thompson at Optimo makes amazing custom hats, but you should go with something a little cheaper until you know for sure what works for you.

All that said, Biltmore makes fine hats. Nothing super special, but not junk either.
post #426 of 530

The link for that hat I mentioned is from Hats-Plus :slayer: I hear ya about Fedoras, but I carry a negative stigma with them due to their popularity and they generally don't look well on me at all, none that I've seen anyway.  I saw Graham Thompson on a local TV station and his store and everything in it look amazing but out of my range at the current time.  I appreciate the tip on a porkpie..  :cheers:

post #427 of 530
Much depends on what you plan to wear it with. With a suit? Go nuts. More casually? You do risk contracting hipsteritis.

There are lots of varying shapes of Fedora. You cod try to find one that is less common. Most from the Fedora trend that began10 or so years ago are smaller brims. I got one about 7 years ago with a classic, wide brim, in medium grey, and wore it tons for a few years to the point it needs cleaving and blocking now. It's pretty unique from most that I see.

I find my homburg, which I've had since August, is harder to wear, though it's always good with a suit, and normally with a coat that extends to the knee or below. If you want one to wear with lots of things, if say get a less formal colour, like grey, or brown. That does mean you can't wear it with a Tuxedo, of course, if that matters to you. I'm actually considering a second one in brown, for myself. With more casual stuff I wear my Fedora, or one of
my trilbies.
post #428 of 530

Ok, maybe a simple/dumb question, but I know squat about hats:

My mother just mailed me that she found me a hat from my late grandfathers collection. I have never worn a hat so (although I don't know yet if it will fit me) I was wondering the following:

  • what type of hat is it?
  • is this type still wearable today?

 

Would be much obliged for any info on the hat.

post #429 of 530
From the photo it looks like there was something sitting on the crown of the hat, thus causing it to caved in. If I have to guess, from the tight curl on the brim, I'm guessing it's a homberg, the one with a centre crease down the middle of the crown, but it could also be a homberg with two pinches on the side of the crown, sort of like a mix with a fedora/trilby.

I doubt it's wearable at this moment, but if there is no damage on the felt, you can easily re-block the hat with the right person. You can also try to remold the crown with some steam, if you so inclined. Let us know how it goes.
post #430 of 530
It's a Homburg that's probably been dented to look more casual.
post #431 of 530
That is a high quality hat, and if the felt has not been damaged, it is worth cleaning up and bringing back to life. Especially since it belonged to your grandfather.
It probably needs a good brushing and then reshaping, which is not hard to do with steam.
post #432 of 530
Thanks for the info everyone. The indent indeed striked me as odd (but then again I don't know anything about hats), so I will have to look into reshaping it somehow. It might be a while though before I actually have the hat in my possession.


Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

That is a high quality hat, and if the felt has not been damaged, it is worth cleaning up and bringing back to life. Especially since it belonged to your grandfather.

It probably needs a good brushing and then reshaping, which is not hard to do with steam.


Is this something I can do myself (any vids/info on the net maybe) or should I visit a specialised hatter of some sort?

post #433 of 530

On the subject of reshaping with steam, can someone tell me how to do this for my fedora, or direct me to a set of instructions online?

post #434 of 530
You take the hat, hold it over the steam from a teapot or a clothes steamer, and use your hands to form it into the shape you want. It's not hard. Generally, you should start by popping the crown out all the way, known as open crown. From there I would give it a good brushing with a clean horsehair brush (the ones you buy for shoes are fine, but not one with shoe polish!), and then steam it again, then crease it how you like.

Oh, and always steam from the outside. Steam can ruin a sweatband, especially if the leather is dried out. Thinking of which, you'd be well advised to slap some lexol or other leather conditioner on the sweatband if it's a vintage hat.

Real hatters can use real hat blocks made of wood to form your hat into a new shape, so there is some advantage there, but doing it by hand isn't a big challenge.
post #435 of 530

How much grit/sweat/crap can you get out of it with a brush?

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