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Japanese Shoes: Bespoke & RTW Super Thread - Page 231

post #3451 of 4063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

Okay, I have a question: if shoemaking is a part-time thing for Murata-san, why does he use so much time to reach this level of perfection?

Oh, I meant he makes bespoke shoes (as in taking order from clients) more as is side occupation. His daytime job is teaching shoemaking courses at the Esperanza Institute at Asakusa (shoeschool.jp), where they have an extensive 2 year course for career shoemaking.

Yohei Iwasaki, the chief bottom maker at George Cleverly, was Murata`s student. Yohei`s interview (http://shoeschool.jp/interview/iwasaki/) tells how inspired he was by Murata sensei`s classes and his shoemaking principle.

Murata san`s life and career (both his job and his own brand) is centered around shoes. His father is also a shoemaker
Edited by nutcracker - 11/5/15 at 11:19am
post #3452 of 4063
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

I swear no one does a chiseled toe like Marquess...just look at that contour!

 

You'll probably like Bolero's chiseled last as well, they are quite similar:

 

 

More pics on his blog: http://boleroshoe.exblog.jp/

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post


Oh, I meant he makes bespoke shoes (as in taking order from clients) more as is side occupation. His daytime job is teaching shoemaking courses at the Esperanza Institute at Asakusa (shoeschool.jp), where they have an extensive 2 year course for career shoemaking.

Yohei Iwasaki, the chief bottom maker at George Cleverly, was Murata`s student. Yohei`s interview (http://shoeschool.jp/interview/iwasaki/) tells how inspired he was by Murata sensei`s classes and his shoemaking principle.

Murata san`s life and career (both his job and his own brand) is centered around shoes. His father is also a shoemaker

 

Aha, that explains it!

post #3453 of 4063

My first pair of MTO shoes from Hiro Yanagamachi are ready for delivery. I can't wait until I receive them! I will probably order a pair of bespoke shoes from him next year.

 

post #3454 of 4063

Nutcracker, any RTW or semi-bespoke shoes I can purchase in Osaka?I will be there next month for Christmas.

post #3455 of 4063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrorsquad View Post

Nutcracker, any RTW or semi-bespoke shoes I can purchase in Osaka?I will be there next month for Christmas.

For semi-bespoke in Osaka area,

OLD HAT OSAKA does good year welted MTO shoes. Just a great place to hang out too
BONTA Bespoke Shoemaker: I believe he also makes semi-bespoke
SPIGOLA: The King is only a short ride away in Kobe smile.gif

For RTW, Osaka`s Mitsukoshi Isetan carries MIYAGI KOGYO shoes. Not much selection, but worth checking out if you`re already in the area. Hankyu Men`s is probably the best bet of RTW shoes, Japanese and imports.

Bespoke:

I will still recommend checking out Ann Bespoke Shoemaker. Only heard really really good things about Nishiyama san (with an English pedigree as good as any other top Japanese shoemakers)
http://ann-bespoke.com/
post #3456 of 4063
+1 for Aki, lovely guy as well.
post #3457 of 4063
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

"Slaughtermen, undertakers, those working with leather and in other 'unclean' professions such as sanitation have long been marginalised in Japan. That prejudice continues to this day and especially for those working in the Shibaura abattoir."

This new article is on the topic of the burakumin, and I'm wondering if shoemakers are included as well.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-34615972

I haven't heard outcasts manufactured all kinds of footwear. They manufactured leather soled sandals "Setta" and leather goods. Up until 1871, Dan Naoki (1823-1889, the 13th Dan zaemon), the head of outcasts in the Tokyo area, had some monopolies. One of them was the right to acquire dead cattle and horses for free and to use their hide and leather. 4 pairs of Setta were equivalent to an annual living cost for an adult individual. Outcasts were excluded from the society consisting of samurai, chōnin (townsmen: merchants and craftsmen), and hyakushō (farmers, fishermen, and hunters), but they lived a stable life owing to the monopolies.

Slaughtering and tanning are considered as an outcasts' traditional business. According to a reportage published in 1999 by Kado-oka Nobuhiko, a journalist and a descendant of outcasts, the owner of a slaughtering factory descended from non-outcasts tells him that about a third of the entire slaughtering business are descended from non-outcasts, IIRC.

Quote:
Setta, a leather cigarette case, and a leather wallet.

http://www.jinken-net.com/close-up/0211.html
ph1.jpg
ph3.jpg


In 1871, the government abolished not only the han system (an administrative reform) but also the outcast system and their monopolies. Samurais lost their job by the reform. Although the government officially supported unemployed samurais, they didn't do outcasts. The impoverishment of outcasts begun.

Nishimura Katsuzo (1837-1907), a founder of Regal, established the first shoe factory for the military. He became a merchant from a lordless samurai. Otsuka Iwajiro (1859-1925), a founder of Otsuka, was an unemployed samurai and learned handmade shoemaking at the factory. He became the first shoemaker to the Emperor.
Quote:
Shoemakers from unemployed samurais ca. 1892.

http://roudouundoumeiji.com/rekisi-3.html
image47.jpg


Because of no official support, the millionaire Dan Naoki spent almost all his own funds. Although his business didn't succeed, he is known as the pioneer of Japanese Northampton "Asakusa."

Here is a good summary. ("Monguor people and others" is wrong translation. Samurais is correct.)
Quote:
http://tokyoanaba.blogspot.com/2011/10/tokyo-human-rights-center-part-1.html

The origins of the modern leather industry
With the Meiji Restoration, European leather tanning techniques were adopted in Japan, which helped modernize the leather industry. It also facilitated the production of military equipment for a modern military.
The modernization of the leather industry can be traced from three important routes, which extend to the modern day:
1. Traditional leather making techniques (Dan Naoki, etc.)
2. Business between the government and merchants (Nishimura Katsuzo, etc.)
 (March 15, the date Nishimura opened the first shoe factory in Japan is celebrated as Shoes Day in Japan today)
3. To provide employment to the Monguor people and others that lost their salary (Otsuka Iwajiro--the man who founded Otsuka Shoten, which is now Otsuka Shoe Co., Ltd. etc.)

Dan Naoki's leather and shoe factory
Dan Naoki (the 13th and final Danzaemon) had the goal of securing a livelihood for the outcasts. In order to do so, he was ordered to learn European leather technology, and made plans to supply shoes and more to the military. In 1870 he was rewarded with a contract with the Ministry of War and in 1871 set up a leather production learning center in the Takinogawa area of Oji (present-day Kita-ku).
American specialists were also brought to Japan to help modernize leather production and shoemaking based on traditional methods.

In 1871, with the abolition of the outcast system (exclusive trade in leather), animal skins became difficult to obtain.
In 1872, the factory was moved to Asakusa.
Dan Naoki was not exactly successful managing the factory, but he helped explain the new technology to many outcasts. These new specialists that he trained shouldered the burden of leather and shoemaking in Japan from this point.

Edited by VegTan - 11/6/15 at 5:00pm
post #3458 of 4063
Thread Starter 
Also worth noting that prior to bringing in American specialists, the earliest instructors Dan hired were Chinese cobblers smile.gif
post #3459 of 4063
Thank you for the thorough explanation, VegTan. You are the man!
post #3460 of 4063
Thanks nutcracker!

Anyone have any idea wht are the current prices for Spigola MTO's if I were to visit their atelier in Kobe?

Thanks!
post #3461 of 4063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrorsquad View Post

Thanks nutcracker!

Anyone have any idea wht are the current prices for Spigola MTO's if I were to visit their atelier in Kobe?

Thanks!

Got this from Spigola`s website. 2014 price. Not sure if they raised it again

post #3462 of 4063
clematis shoes japan are sold at Liverano & Liverano in Florence.
post #3463 of 4063
Query: how does one identify quality sharkskin from the poor or mediocre? I haven't handled enough accessories or shuus made from it so far to know the difference.
post #3464 of 4063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

Query: how does one identify quality sharkskin from the poor or mediocre? I haven't handled enough accessories or shuus made from it so far to know the difference.

Here is the skin that Takano san used. Don`t remember if the parts for my pair were already cut from this or not.

AppleMark

AppleMark
post #3465 of 4063
All right, I recently went to Tokyo and took the opportunity to try out a bespoke shoe maker. Pics below.

Started off by discussing about the design for the two pairs I bespoke - 1 round toe, and 1 chisel toe. Provided him pictures as reference and he sketched how it'd look like.









Discussed the detailing for the shoes - pitched heel and fiddleback waist - spent some time pondering if I should go for the fiddleback back waist because for Japanese shoemakers, these don't come as standard, and they cost up to 250 USD extra. Money that could be well channeled into another pair of shoes.





Then chose the leather - for one pair I opted for the lacquered Japanese Kurozan leather that came at a significant upcharge, and for the second pair, went with box calf.





Measurement process. Had me stand on two sheets of paper before he sketched out the outline of my feet and took measurements







Now, I'm going to have to wait for my fitting shoes. He'll send them to me, and I have a go at them before he cuts them up to determine areas for improvement, and makes the final pairs. Pictures of fitting shoes and those that have been cut up below. Was wondering if anybody knows if we can request to keep the fitting shoes smile.gif








Tools he uses to make the last, and finish the shoes









Some miscellaneous points:

Was contemplating whether to opt for lasted trees and I was showed two pairs of shoes, both on the same last barring the toe-shape -- one has been stored on a last, the other, on a generic pair of trees. Spot the differences of the effects of the trees on the shoe! smile.gif



Some bonus pictures that are non-shoes related, though hand made. Don't mean to hallow all things Japanese but I popped into a spectacle shop and was blown away by the fact that even their glasses are handmade with minute attention to finish and details - this is celluloid with steel combination. Maker's name is engraved in kanji characters, and the phrase "hand made" is as well. and not very princely in price either.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
IMG_0310_zpspkojrdsm.jpg

FullSizeRender%201_zpsjwaemnih.jpg
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Edited by bboysdontcryy - 11/13/15 at 5:23pm
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