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Japanese Shoes: Bespoke & RTW Super Thread - Page 186

post #2776 of 3055
The blue cordovan monkey boots are beautiful. I would order a pair if I had confidence in the fit.[/COLOR]
post #2777 of 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post


Congrats on your new boots! ¥35K seems like a good steal! Yes, there are a slew of Japan-only C&J models and lasts, and those may very well be one.

 

Thanks, Nutcracker. The Tokyo heat makes boots a little too hot in summer, but I look forward to wearing them soon enough!

post #2778 of 3055
Tokyo is effing mushiatsui.

Had my second fitting with Marquess today. He had made me another fitting pair without even asking for it, and the fit was the best I've ever experienced. Apparently it gets even better.

http://instagram.com/p/rq8BXSD4fB/
post #2779 of 3055
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stefan88 View Post

Tokyo is effing mushiatsui.

Had my second fitting with Marquess today. He had made me another fitting pair without even asking for it, and the fit was the best I've ever experienced. Apparently it gets even better.

http://instagram.com/p/rq8BXSD4fB/

Most splendid! Looking at your cut up fitting shoes, looks like you`re getting even more fine tuning ! fing02[1].gif
post #2780 of 3055
Thread Starter 
A delicious pair of olive green oxford by TYE SHOEMAKER










TYE Shoemaker Blog
post #2781 of 3055

^^ Holy shit...that stitching is just perfect!

post #2782 of 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddler View Post
 

^^ Holy shit...that stitching is just perfect!

 

+1

 

Almost ridicoulously perfect, like the pictures are made in a computer. I could just look at that third row of sticthing on the inside of the facing for hours.

post #2783 of 3055
Just as I read that these green oxs are by TYE, I thought about stitching...and sure enough, the maker doesn't fail. I wonder if they have found same rare Victorian machine that's the last of its kind, stitching away cleaner and tighter than all others.
post #2784 of 3055
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by j ingevaldsson View Post

+1

Almost ridicoulously perfect, like the pictures are made in a computer. I could just look at that third row of sticthing on the inside of the facing for hours.

Ohno san said he try to make those look like miniscule gimping. It`s now like a signature TYE detail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

Just as I read that these green oxs are by TYE, I thought about stitching...and sure enough, the maker doesn't fail. I wonder if they have found same rare Victorian machine that's the last of its kind, stitching away cleaner and tighter than all others.

The guy who does the upper at TYE (Ohno`s partner) is simply amazing. The funny thing is, Ohno-san`s wife is also a talented artisan in her own right, and she makes the uppers / stiching for Clematis and Ortus (but not TYE).
post #2785 of 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post

A delicious pair of olive green oxford by TYE SHOEMAKER
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)







TYE Shoemaker Blog

That contrast stitching really takes the shoes to another level. And that's a lovely green. Reminds me more of an apple than an olive green.
post #2786 of 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

Just as I read that these green oxs are by TYE, I thought about stitching...and sure enough, the maker doesn't fail. I wonder if they have found same rare Victorian machine that's the last of its kind, stitching away cleaner and tighter than all others.

No Victorian sewing machine is significantly better than a more modern, say, 20th century one.

More likely, it's the Victorian sensibilities of the sewing machine operator.
post #2787 of 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddler View Post
 

^^ Holy shit...that stitching is just perfect!

 

It is excellent, isn't it? 

 

The stitching on my Santoni FAMs and some of my other Italian shoes is also very, very good, with a high number of stitches per cm and very neat lines. 

 

For some reason, Italian shoemakers and shirtmakers seem to be better at fine, high stitch count stitching than their English counterparts, and looking at that stitching, Japanese shoemakers seem to take after the Italians. 

post #2788 of 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

It is excellent, isn't it? 

The stitching on my Santoni FAMs and some of my other Italian shoes is also very, very good, with a high number of stitches per cm and very neat lines. 

For some reason, Italian shoemakers and shirtmakers seem to be better at fine, high stitch count stitching than their English counterparts, and looking at that stitching, Japanese shoemakers seem to take after the Italians. 

I apologize for dampening anyone's enthusiasm, but while the stitching is very neat and the choice of thread colour harmonious and the shoes very nice looking, the stitching is not particularly fine (in the sense of individual stitches being close together...more stitches per inch)

It's hard to tell from a photo but I seriously doubt that the stitching is finer than roughly 12spi. The only way to know for sure would be to count them but I estimate the above photo of the back of the shoe to be about 30% larger than life. I count 8-9spi along the top line.

In Traditional English work 18-22 spi would be good (not exceptional) work. You can even see such frequency in vintage American manufactured shoes. And there are examples in museums of stitch counts as high as 64spi (of course that was done by hand and strictly for show).

FWIW...
post #2789 of 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


It's hard to tell from a photo but I seriously doubt that the stitching is finer than roughly 12spi. The only way to know for sure would be to count them but I estimate the above photo of the back of the shoe to be about 30% larger than life. I count 8-9spi along the top line.

Judging by the picture, it appears to me the closer has used a different stitch length and a different needle to do the top line and the main body of the shoe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post


The stitches along the top line are slanted and sit piggy-back on top of the next one (same effect asyou get in fine hand stitching using a lance shaped awl). To get that look in machine stitching, you use a "narrow wedge point" needle, I would guess the stitch length is maybe 10-11/inch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post


The main closing work seams to be done with a round needle. Here the stitches line up to a straight line, so the 'head' of one stitch line up perfectly to the 'tail' of the previous one. I would guess the stitches are somewhat smaller (about 14/inch) than the top line ones. Also notice how carefully the tension has been adjusted so every stitch sits on his own like a little pearl.

Any closer who is willing to change needle and settings within a single pair of shoes has my absolute admiration.
post #2790 of 3055
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

Judging by the picture, it appears to me the closer has used a different stitch length and a different needle to do the top line and the main body of the shoe.
The stitches along the top line are slanted and sit piggy-back on top of the next one (same effect asyou get in fine hand stitching using a lance shaped awl). To get that look in machine stitching, you use a "narrow wedge point" needle, I would guess the stitch length is maybe 10-11/inch.
The main closing work seams to be done with a round needle. Here the stitches line up to a straight line, so the 'head' of one stitch line up perfectly to the 'tail' of the previous one. I would guess the stitches are somewhat smaller (about 14/inch) than the top line ones. Also notice how carefully the tension has been adjusted so every stitch sits on his own like a little pearl.

Any closer who is willing to change needle and settings within a single pair of shoes has my absolute admiration.

I agree.

Maybe not so deliberate, however. For instance, I have two flatbed machines set up generally with round or what is known as "tri-tip" needle points. But my post machines...which are a must for topline and closing...are, by default, set up with narrow-reverse-twist needles.

How wide do you think the "stay" stitch at the bottom of the facing is? I'd bet it's real close to half an inch wide. Compare it to the machine stitching just below it. I count 6+ machine stitches which would make 14spi a little optimistic.

Anyway, not to take anything away from the shoes, or the workmanship...just putting things into perspective and noting that although we don't see such work coming out of the manufacturies, it's pretty much Traditional British bespoke work that sets the standards. Makes us notice and admire fine needle work.

On edit...BTW, for anyone interested there is a fine (and accurate) webpage about needle points and their effect on seams, here. Of particular interest is page 2 through 4 and the "highlights" comments. I've been using Schmetz (and, alternately, Lammertz and/or Groz-Beckert) needles for forever and have always considered this information critical.

--
Edited by DWFII - 8/17/14 at 9:00am
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