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Japanese Shoes: Bespoke & RTW Super Thread - Page 113

post #1681 of 3043
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post

After ignoring repeated requests asking me to do so uhoh.gif, I've finally compiled all of my workshop visits, trunk show reports, translations, and shopping guides into this single post (and I almost barfed looking through the entire thread)
Hopefully one day, I can post them on a user friendly website/blog, but here it is for now, in the chronological order.

Enjoy folks! and there more to come! (Spigola show report etc..) fing02[1].gif

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
edit: This post is now linked on my signature!

Brilliant nc, thanks.
post #1682 of 3043

Appreciate it, NC!

post #1683 of 3043
Thread Starter 
SPIGOLA MTO Shoes
Trunk Show @ United Arrows Roppongi Men's Store
9/26~9/28

Ah, Spigola... possibly the most coveted Japanese RTW/MTO shoes in the world. Sure the pictures on their website and on The Armoury look incredible, but those photos are meant to impress (with gorgeous makeups under calculated lighting, angles and such). Recently, I had the opportunity to document their (almost) entire lineup of MTO shoes with my mundane photographic skills and an average lighting. Perhaps these would give a better sense of what's available, and how they look in the real world lighting.

Prices for the MTO shoes start from 108K JPY direct, and 120K JPY or so from the domestic trunk shows. They are all hand lasted, handsewn welted, and the waists are hand stitched (only the front portion of the sole is machine stitched). Aside from the machine stitched soles, all procedures are done by Suzuki-san and his small team of 3 craftsmen at their Kobe atelier. The sharp looking pret lasts (3 choices) are close replications of Spigola's famed bespoke lasts, and the leather selection (100+ leathers including rare exotics) are also identical from their bespoke offering. Sizes are available up to EU46 (UK 12 or so).

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So here they are, SPIGOLA MTO line in all their greatness.

Click below for the full lineup.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

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The incredible leather selection. A wide variety of textured leathers (mostly from Italy), exotics (llama, crocs, hippos etc...)

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Square toe and round toe. Essentially the same last, but the square toe is a smidgen longer.

Oxfords
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Captoe oxford in black

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Half brogue oxford

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Adelaide oxford in suede

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Captoe oxford in lizard

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A great looking wingtips in the square toe last.

Derbies
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U-Tip derby.

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Suede U-Tip derby in a bespoke last

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Plaintoe derby in genuine llama leather

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Plaintoe derby in another great textured leather

Monks
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Double monk. Their most popular design

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Single monk. Wear it like slip-ons

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Double monk in a bespoke last

Loafers and Chukka
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Elastic loafers. The newest addition to the MTO line.

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Elastics in tan croc

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Sleek chukkas in the square last

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Loafer in brown crocs. Bespoke last

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Loafers in those textured suede would look stunning

The Soles
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The square toe last. Incredibly sleek, thanks to the handstitched waist

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The round toe last


Dainite sole. Doesn't look bad at all

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I love how the dainite piece fits to the contours of the waist

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Original Spigola tree. 3-piece trees and tube-spring trees are also available

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Etsuo Suzuki. Brother of Koji, and an Italian trained shoemaker in his own right. He is in charge of the Tokyo shows.

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Mr. Suzuki with Mr. Shimizu, the shoe guru of United Arrows.

Many thanks to Etsuo san and Shimizu san (@ United Arrows Roppongi Men's Store)
post #1684 of 3043

Dear nutcracker, how do you compare the lasts of Spigola RTW/MTO shoes to the english lasts, like EG, GG, JL, C&J?

I could buy a pair from the armoury but they refused to give any comparisons and said it will be a gamble.

I can't afford a gamble for 2K bucks.

I'm basically interested in a derby shoe on a last close to EG 82/202/606 in standard E width, what would you recommend?

 

PS If such question was already answered could you please advise the thread?

post #1685 of 3043
Nutcracker, thank you for the photo gallery, shoes shoes in them.
post #1686 of 3043
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdolina View Post

Dear nutcracker, how do you compare the lasts of Spigola RTW/MTO shoes to the english lasts, like EG, GG, JL, C&J?
I could buy a pair from the armoury but they refused to give any comparisons and said it will be a gamble.
I can't afford a gamble for 2K bucks.
I'm basically interested in a derby shoe on a last close to EG 82/202/606 in standard E width, what would you recommend?

PS If such question was already answered could you please advise the thread?

The lasts are probably more Italian than English in shape. The width is actually quite full (E width), despite the narrow look.
For the square toed last, I went down a full size vs my GG/EG size, due to the elongated toe. The toe is quite pointed, more like G&G TG73.
For the loafer last, I went 1/2 size down vs GG/EG.

For either of the two pairs (that I've ordered), the fits weren't perfect for me due to my low instep, so I've had some kind of adjustments made.

I haven't tried the round toe last (probably similar to 82), so can't really say about that one.

I understand others have different experiences.

Yeah, I wouldn't recommend getting these shoes via mail either. I don't even think they even offer their MTO shoes over the mail (I asked).

I think The Armoury has a set of trial shoes with them the whole time, but I could be wrong.
post #1687 of 3043
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post

SPIGOLA MTO Shoes
Trunk Show @ United Arrows Roppongi Men's Store
9/26~9/28
 

:drool:

post #1688 of 3043
Quote:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdolina View Post

Dear nutcracker, how do you compare the lasts of Spigola RTW/MTO shoes to the english lasts, like EG, GG, JL, C&J?
I could buy a pair from the armoury but they refused to give any comparisons and said it will be a gamble.
I can't afford a gamble for 2K bucks.
I'm basically interested in a derby shoe on a last close to EG 82/202/606 in standard E width, what would you recommend?

PS If such question was already answered could you please advise the thread?
 

The lasts are probably more Italian than English in shape. The width is actually quite full (E width), despite the narrow look.
For the square toed last, I went down a full size vs my GG/EG size, due to the elongated toe. The toe is quite pointed, more like G&G TG73.
For the loafer last, I went 1/2 size down vs GG/EG.

For either of the two pairs (that I've ordered), the fits weren't perfect for me due to my low instep, so I've had some kind of adjustments made.

I haven't tried the round toe last (probably similar to 82), so can't really say about that one.

I understand others have different experiences.

Yeah, I wouldn't recommend getting these shoes via mail either. I don't even think they even offer their MTO shoes over the mail (I asked).

I think The Armoury has a set of trial shoes with them the whole time, but I could be wrong.

 

I have a MTO pair of  round toe split toe derby from the trunk show at The Armoury.  Trial shoes were all black oxford on round lasts then.  I doubt The Armoury keeps  trial shoes when it  doesn't hold trunk shows. 

 

If you make a comparison to EG lasts, it is closer to 82E than to 202E.   Toe box is lower than 202 vertically.  As NC mentioned, it is quite wide around ball joint so I needed to insert additional insock.  Both Koji and Armoury are very helpful to make such an adjustment and now the pair is comfortable to wear.   In terms of length, as we were talking in terms of EUR sizing so I cannot make a comment.  I think my pair is EUR38.5 and outside measurement is the same as my GG (MH71) and EG 888 of  UK 5.5

 

I feel allowance for margin of error of Spigola shoes is not large.  Some shoes are comfortably wearable even if sizing/fitting is off and some shoes are not.  I have to agree that buying those without trying is quite a gamble and odd is quite unfavorable.

post #1689 of 3043
Thread Starter 
M. Jacomet (Parisan Gentleman) talking about Japanese shoes.....
http://parisiangentleman.fr/2013/10/02/le-japon-lautre-pays-du-soulier/



Unfortunately I can't read French.... smile.gif
post #1690 of 3043
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post

Unfortunately I can't read French.... smile.gif

Here is a google translation:
Quote:
Japan is a fascinating country.

And I'm not talking about eternal stereotypes that some people like to keep them alive with great bursts of quasi - mystical aphorisms attributed magical powers to all that is written in Sanskrit / Kanji / Hanzi / hangul or another. After all, as Oscar Wilde said it best "The actual people Have you live in Japan are not Unlike the general run of English people ; That is to say , They are extremely commonplace , and Have nothing curious or extraordinary about 'em . "

In our area , it should also restore a simple truth: the Japanese salaryman is not better dressed than the French average frame.

However, it is quite correct to say that Japan is no slouch when it comes to produce bitter and enthusiasts with the last stage collectors. Beautifully sunk individuals whose idealized vision of the " golden age" of the classic masculine style is both a great romance and great freshness . Amazing characters like japanese centipede ( http://centipede.web.fc2.com/ ) and her shoe collection to make your head spin , or friends of the 30s Style ( http://www.the30sstyle.com/ ) to name only two.

It would not be an exaggeration to say that Japanese artisans are renowned for their attention to detail and their unusual detail , the result of a culture has always held in high esteem crafts . As the beautiful local production of whiskey we could prove it, Japan did not fear to take over a foreign originally crafts to enrich its local expertise and finally come up with something new in return .

This is flipping through a number of Japanese Mook Last ( 4 ) dedicated to male shoe, the idea for this article came to me . Although briefly mentioned a few times on left , we had not ever really looked at the art Japanese shoemaker .

The random things that made during a visit to a leather tannery camels in Dubai, Hugo crossed both publishers Last, who graciously offered us a number , a sacred boon if one considers how the magazine is hard to find outside of Japan. And if my level of Japanese is in progress, there is at the moment too weak to assess the editorial line to its fair value, the high quality of the proposed shopping guide and over three stories dedicated to Yohei Fukuda , Bolero and Regal Tokyo seem very convincing.

Japan produces shoes among the most elegant and finest that I have ever admire . As Justin Fitzpatrick , our " Shoe Snob " preferred puts it , " I never pull of looking at shoes made by Japanese bespoke shoemakers [ ... ] something about Their Shoes , even though They May Be classic styles, always Seem To set apart Themselves from Their Competitors . "
Japanese shoes have undeniably what little I do not know what ...

It is not difficult to describe the outline of the art Italian and English shoemaker. As for tailoring art, the English tend to prefer simple shapes, very classic, where the Italians tend to favor forms more slender and more natural. Japanese art seems to be stacked on the other hand almost as elusive as the art French shoemaker. In this he seems to be a synthesis of English and Italian schools, plus color and local expertise.

Moreover, a number of Japanese artisans shoemakers were apprentices for ON EUROPEAN houses. A craftsman like Yukiko Bassett Okawa Bench Made For example studied "Cordwainers College of London" before working for John Lobb for 8 years. Unsurprisingly, his creations are much closer to what is done in England than with Spigola Koji Suzuki, the latter having made his debut in Italy with Roberto Ugolini. And although Japan has also a lot of local high quality curriculum, such a transfer of knowledge beyond the borders is certainly not trivial and is to be welcomed.
And that's probably what makes art Japanese shoemaker such an interesting scene to follow, the number of bespoke shoemakers is very important, as the number of different styles they offer, and local demand can not seem to weaken. For it is on local consumption that Japanese artisans survive and some, like Bolero, say they have never made a pair tailored for Western customers! Such a pool of talent is also playing the competition significantly. Thus, it is not uncommon to see offers tailored to 200,000 yen (~ 1500e), although rather average prices are around ¥ 315,000 (~ 2300th) in the case of homes built as Otsuka (and their beautiful Balmoral boots).

The Japanese school definitely has something to say.

And well beyond the romantic and exotic aspect of it, the simplicity, elegance and extreme refinement of the Japanese lines have already won over many fans of male shoes. Thoroughness and attention to detail amazing artisans believed also gave the shoe a beautiful Nippon international reputation.

Many craftsmen and apprentices are also many years scattered around the world (Emiko Matsuda at Foster & Son, Kuroki Satoshi at John Lobb), some even living in Europe under their own name (Hidetaka "It Micio" Fukaya in Florence, Ryota Hayafuji Munich), and as can be expected, their reputation precedes them.

And if the shoe is exported from Japan to the final few in the West, it is more by financial constraints (10am + tickets for a fitting, it's a lot!) Than anything else. And these houses do not need to export to survive (as is the case for Western homes), the sector is fully satisfactory Asian demand shows no sign of weakness.

The large number of bespoke shoemakers present in Japan, a passionate and meticulous press and an educated and knowledgeable public are therefore, not surprisingly, of the rising sun and a fertile creative territory Country for male shoe but also for the elegance classic male.

Japan and the other countries of the shoe?

Certainly.

Greg Jacomet. Publisher.
post #1691 of 3043
cheers for that, Rolf.
post #1692 of 3043
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

Here is a google translation:

Thanks for the translation, B-S! Appreciate it!

Sounds quite eloquent, even after google translation. I couldn't have described better biggrin.gif
post #1693 of 3043
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post


Sounds quite eloquent, even after google translation. I couldn't have described better biggrin.gif

It is amazing how far these computer translations have come within a few years. Ten years ago, they only could come up with gobbledegook!.
post #1694 of 3043
Well, PG does have a grandiose way of choosing and combining words, even in their French to English translations. If you've seen Jacomet's interview with Kinowear, which you should, you know he's a man of passion and works with ideas, taking the form of clothing. It may just be Google's service acting up but the last I saw or read, Yukiko Okawa Bassett was of the womenfolk. The text uses him.
post #1695 of 3043
...and I just noticed that PG has used Nutcracker's scanlations on their article. Did they ask for permission, nutcracker? If not, this is infringement of the naughtiest kind.
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