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Japanese Shoes: Bespoke & RTW Super Thread - Page 94

post #1396 of 3047
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post


Is this why lots of themo do internships in Europe?

 

I don't think so. The Japanese attitude to craft in general is that you learn from the best, be utterly devoted to your chosen craft and endevour not just to replicate but to develop the craft you've learned. Unlike, say, ceramics, Japan does not have a long tradition of making western-style shoes, so the most serious young Japanese shoemakers will try to learn in those places which do have a long tradition, i.e. Europe. Japanese bakers and patissiers are the same.

post #1397 of 3047
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Is this why lots of themo do internships in Europe?

In regards to what I wrote previously about the job-prospect for new shoemakers, I think the answer is yes to a certain degree. An apprenticeship in a prestigious workshop in Europe will always look good on the resume!

But of course, like FlyingMonkey-san said, these folks yearn to study in Europe because they want to learn the 'real deal'.

It's not that there isn't a tradition of shoemaking in Japan. They've been making western-style shoes for over 140 years. I've seen exceptional works being done by locally trained shoemakers, like Ketiaro Takano (Clematis), and Masaru Okuyama, to name a few. However there is a preconception (among many Japanese shoemakers) that Japanese workshops tend to put a gruelling emphasis on perfecting the technical skills (compared to European counterparts), and not enough to nurture creativity (or sensibility) among the apprentices. Perhaps too much of that 140 years have been spent on perfecting the craft learned or imitated from the English, the Americans, and the Italians, and not barely enough to develop a tradition of style that is distinguishably Japanese (and good looking). I think same can said about other western-derived crafts such as cooking (as FM mentioned above).

I can't really say how much of the preconception above is valid (because, again, locally trained shoemakers are certainly capable of designing beautiful shoes), but lots of young shoemakers do indeed yearn to score an apprenticeship in Europe. Some foreign trained shoemakers I've met told me that they don't go there to learn how to make shoes (they already know how to), but to nurture an (English, French, or Italian) sensibility.

....and of course there are shoemakers who go for the whole package, the whole nine yards, by enrolling in schools in Europe.
post #1398 of 3047
Thread Starter 
A nice little video introducing Miyagi Kogyo, located in Yamagata, Japan



Aside from their original shoes, they also do quite a lot of OEM works for other brands.
post #1399 of 3047
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post

In regards to what I wrote previously about the job-prospect for new shoemakers, I think the answer is yes to a certain degree. An apprenticeship in a prestigious workshop in Europe will always look good on the resume!

But of course, like FlyingMonkey-san said, these folks yearn to study in Europe because they want to learn the 'real deal'.

It's not that there isn't a tradition of shoemaking in Japan. They've been making western-style shoes for over 140 years. I've seen exceptional works being done by locally trained shoemakers, like Ketiaro Takano (Clematis), and Masaru Okuyama, to name a few. However there is a preconception (among many Japanese shoemakers) that Japanese workshops tend to put a gruelling emphasis on perfecting the technical skills (compared to European counterparts), and not enough to nurture creativity (or sensibility) among the apprentices. Perhaps too much of that 140 years have been spent on perfecting the craft learned or imitated from the English, the Americans, and the Italians, and not barely enough to develop a tradition of style that is distinguishably Japanese (and good looking). I think same can said about other western-derived crafts such as cooking (as FM mentioned above).

I can't really say how much of the preconception above is valid (because, again, locally trained shoemakers are certainly capable of designing beautiful shoes), but lots of young shoemakers do indeed yearn to score an apprenticeship in Europe. Some foreign trained shoemakers I've met told me that they don't go there to learn how to make shoes (they already know how to), but to nurture an (English, French, or Italian) sensibility.

....and of course there are shoemakers who go for the whole package, the whole nine yards, by enrolling in schools in Europe.

That sounds about right.

I am no expert on Japan but travelled there every week for 3 years in the airlines.

Someone said that the Japanese have the idea of kata - ie perfection in action such as sushi cutting and maybe the perfect stroke in golf.

The developing of such perfection is a high achievement to them culturally.

I could see shoemaking (from your thread) has developed/ing along the lines of a type of kata.
post #1400 of 3047

How does one go about ordering a of shoes made koji suzuki shoes from the US?

post #1401 of 3047
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Lesser Evil View Post

How does one go about ordering a of shoes made koji suzuki shoes from the US?

Suzuki-san stopped doing shows in the US many years ago. As for now, you can only order his shoes in Japan and Hong Kong (theArmoury). I believe he doesn't take orders over the phone/mail, but I could be wrong.

Hopefully when the Armoury opens its Tribeca outpost, Koji's shoes would be available in the states again. nod[1].gif
post #1402 of 3047
Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post

Suzuki-san stopped doing shows in the US many years ago. As for now, you can only order his shoes in Japan and Hong Kong (theArmoury). I believe he doesn't take orders over the phone/mail, but I could be wrong.

Hopefully when the Armoury opens its Tribeca outpost, Koji's shoes would be available in the states again. nod[1].gif
at some phenomenal price.
post #1403 of 3047
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post

at some phenomenal price.

Most likely still cheaper than both John Lobbs and better than the brand merchant Cleverley. Besides, their pin up boys just might teach New Yorkers how to wear tweed in hot humid summer.
post #1404 of 3047
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkDerm View Post

at some phenomenal price.

Spigola's MTO shoes are priced quite deliberately ($1200 on average) to compete favorably against high end RTW shoes (EG, JL, GG, StC...). I'm pretty sure there will be an upcharge ($1800~ in Hong Kong), but hopefully not too much....
post #1405 of 3047
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BespokeMakers View Post






Trunk Shows in Tokyo this weekend:

Spigola Trunk Show 7/26~7/28
Il Quadrifoglio Trunk Show 7/27~7/29

.....

Also coming up this Summer:
Foster & Son 8/9~8/13
Il Micio / Hidetaka Fukaya 8/28~8/29
GJ Cleverley 9/6~9/7
Ryota Hayafuji: TBA
Gaziano & Girling: TBA
post #1406 of 3047

   i absolutely have to have at least one japanese shoe art before i'm done

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nutcracker View Post




Trunk Shows in Tokyo this weekend:

Spigola Trunk Show 7/26~7/28
Il Quadrifoglio Trunk Show 7/27~7/29
post #1407 of 3047
Thread Starter 
Kokon Handmade shoes

Kokon is a well known shoe store located in Kanazawa (central Japan). They offer an original line of handmade MTO and Bespoke shoes crafted by Clematis (Keitaro Takano) and shoemaker Tokoyoda Satoru. A client basically selects either one of them. Tokoyoda san hasn't been mentioned here before: He's a bespoke shoemaker (previoiusly for Otsuka); used to have his own brand/label, but I believe he currently works exclusively as an outworker.

The shoes pictured here are all full handmade MTO shoes by Tokoyoda for Kokon.

Derby in chocolate box calf




Holyhead wholecuts in Navy Cordovan




Stafford in L.Brown calf





Blenheim in black box calf





Kokon shoes are available at their Kanazawa store, and also from Avanti, located in Nagoya.

Kokon HP
Avanti HP

from avanti blog
post #1408 of 3047

What a thread, great job NC. What's the price point for those Kokon? They look really good. 

post #1409 of 3047
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by barky View Post

What a thread, great job NC. What's the price point for those Kokon? They look really good. 

Thanks! fing02[1].gif

The shoes pictured above are the upper-end full handmade MTO's, costs ¥190,000+ ($1900+ USD).
Kokon's basic MTO shoes are machine bottomed (though still hand lasted and handsewn welted), costs ¥120,000+ ($1200+ USD)

The lasts and the designs are original to Kokon. Last customization / personal lasts are available, but for extra charge. Bespoke is also available.

I think the prices are quite reasonable, considering they are made by Clematis (Takano-san) and Tokoyoda-san, both excellent shoemakers.
post #1410 of 3047

$1200 is a good price in comparison with Lobbs, EG and such but how's the leather and finishing compared to the $1900 above?.  The derby looks like a dover killer.  Do they have trunk shows or can it be done only in Kanazawa and Nagoya?  Also, is there a permanent location in Osaka to do Corno Blu's MTO? I'll be there in Nov and have tried to email Coccinella in english but have not received any reply. 

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