or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Dry Cleaner marked the tag on my high end shirts..should I complain?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Dry Cleaner marked the tag on my high end shirts..should I complain? - Page 5

post #61 of 94
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
Jesus Christ, 4 pages because some dude has his initials in permanent marker on the inside tag of his shirts.

"Your options are limited"?? what were you planning on doing, commiting bank robberies and leaving the shirts behind as your calling card? Once the go the cleaners, you own the shirt and it sure as hell is no longer "new".

I was getting one of the shirts cleaned to give to my dad. My dad cleans his shirts before he wears them too. But now it seems awkward w/a shirt that's initialed and appears more like a hand me down shirt than a new shirt I got for him.

That was my reason.

Anyhow..no matter..I'll keep them. It's not a big deal. I'll just know now to go to this dry cleaner.

Also the 4 pages are people talking about many other tangents! =)
post #62 of 94
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by olemungu View Post
Holsten, seems like you are in the profession of investment banking. Based on the shirts you buy, you must be above an associate more like VP/MD. If so, there are plenty of chimps--analysts and interns--who would be more than willing to do your shirts. Anyways, I say better to have a shirt returned then lost. I don't have time nor patience to press my own shirt; and I assume that your nonworking hours are too precious for pressing either. Now that you are toned down, its all good.

Pretty close Olemungu. I manage floating rate funds.
It truly is better to have the shirts than lost them.
I too don't have enough time in the day to press them myself. For awhile I tried this, but sometimes you don't have the time, and need an alternative.

I know now to cross the alternative of the cleaners across the street from my home..off of the list.
post #63 of 94
I understand your frustration Holstein; my senior year in college, I took a cashmere scarf of mine to the local dry cleaners in my university's town, and when I got the scarf back, I noticed they had stapled the inventory ticket to the cashmere itself. I went back and complained to the manager. According to the manager, stapling the ticket to the garment itself is the only way to keep track of the garment. My retort to her explanation, was that they could have stapled the ticket to the scarf's label instead of the cashmere itself. Her response to that, was that the labels sometimes come off. In addition to having the ticket stapled to the cashmere, the fringe on the scarf came back frayed, as if it has gotten caught in something.

In the end, I asked for a refund, and got one. Of course, the refund didn't pay for a new scarf, but at least I learned a lesson.
post #64 of 94
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink22m View Post
I understand your frustration Holstein; my senior year in college, I took a cashmere scarf of mine to the local dry cleaners in my university's town, and when I got the scarf back, I noticed they had stapled the inventory ticket to the cashmere itself. I went back and complained to the manager. According to the manager, stapling the ticket to the garment itself is the only way to keep track of the garment. My retort to her explanation, was that they could have stapled the ticket to the scarf's label instead of the cashmere itself. Her response to that, was that the labels sometimes come off. In addition to having the ticket stapled to the cashmere, the fringe on the scarf came back frayed, as if it has gotten caught in something.

In the end, I asked for a refund, and got one. Of course, the refund didn't pay for a new scarf, but at least I learned a lesson.

Thanks for your post. I'm glad other people can relate and I can take this in stride at the same time.
post #65 of 94
I had one dry cleaner print my phone number indelibly at the bottom of the placket of one of my shirts. That didn't bother me.

Another cleaner stapled a tag right through the placket. I read them the riot act about it too. They never did it again either. I never gave them the chance.

My current cleaner around the corner from me in Tokyo slips a paper loop through the buttonhole. They have never stapled anything to my shirts, suits, or cashmere, nor have they marked them in any way.

It goes without saying that cleaners should respect the garments you entrust to them and not mark them or puncture them with staples.
post #66 of 94
I'm very late to this post, but this has happened to me and now I *always* ask a new cleaner if they do it.

To those who have excellent, expensive shirts *and* don't understand what the big deal is:

When you drop your Porsche off at the shop, do you mind if they spraypaint your initials on the inside of the hood?
post #67 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by minimal View Post
I'm very late to this post, but this has happened to me and now I *always* ask a new cleaner if they do it.

To those who have excellent, expensive shirts *and* don't understand what the big deal is:

When you drop your Porsche off at the shop, do you mind if they spraypaint your initials on the inside of the hood?

the day i pay 100k for a shirt is the day i have a problem with it. WORST case scenario is i can replace the shirt for a few hundred$. bad comparison. Actually, if the porsche dealer marked my name on the undercarraige of the car (and there was an actual reason for it, like they may loose the car) then no i wouldnt have a problem with it
post #68 of 94
Happened to me too, very poor form. I'm not going back. I think some of the perminant ink actually got on other parts of the shirt somehow, too. Ever since then I find these black pencil-like markings. The more I think about it, the more pissed I get.
post #69 of 94
I don't know what I'm missing here, apparently a lot, so I ask you to accept my apologies if I've totally sunk into the Valley of Incomprehension, but this has to seem one of the most baffling posts I've come across. I keep expecting it to turn out to be a joke.

Rhetorically, I would echo questions already asked, such as why you were considering taking the shirts back to the makers, and why you were cleaning a shirt that you planned to give away.

Nevertheless, having your laundry mark in a shirt should not prevent any reputable company from taking back a shirt that in any way proved unsatisfactory to you. Goods should satisfy you, either fresh or worn.

Finally, I offer several personal experiences that may palliate your concern.

First, I always remove all tags from purchases immediately and I just returned a handful this past Winter; no problem (the tagging issue has come up elsewhere on the Forum, albeit not in this post but I think it is still germane to the issue of returns).

Second, and speaking of the "old" Brooks Bros., I once slept an entire Winter in my nightshirts and then, at the urging of the salesman when I alluded to my dissatisfaction with their durability, I returned 3 of them for complete replacements with new nightshirts. Plus on a number of occasions I have returned oxford cloth shirts that had shrunk (neck or sleeves) during laundering, and they all had my initials right on the neckband itself.
post #70 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater View Post
Really? You have shirts dry cleaned before you give them to someone as a gift? That's a novel idea.

Sounded odd to me -- if Dad doesn't love the shirt, or the fit, then his options are pretty limited. A great shirt without tags and straight from the cleaners would seem used to me if I were receiving it.
post #71 of 94
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PuppetBoy View Post
Sounded odd to me -- if Dad doesn't love the shirt, or the fit, then his options are pretty limited. A great shirt without tags and straight from the cleaners would seem used to me if I were receiving it.
It's the principle of the shirt being from the factory..and you don't know where it's been. Having it clean gives some people a sense of reassurance of cleaniness. Call it what you want to, but it's just how he prefers it. It's also a shirt he's tried on before and I know the size he likes. So it wasn't blind purchase for him. He fits it and I knew he'd like it..that's why I sent it in for cleaning. You don't know how many countless people tried on that shirt before you get it..so that's where the rationale comes from. My brother in law does the same thing. He washes every clothing item he buys from the store before wearing it. Maybe we're a hypochondriac family =)
post #72 of 94
I miss Vaclav's postings.
post #73 of 94
Everything I buy gets cleaned before use too. SOmething I started doing after see my mother's b/f do it 15 years ago. Plus any shirt I get has creases from being folded, so I take it in to have it cleaned and pressed. Who knows what dirty hands have touched the shirt before I received it.
post #74 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Styk33 View Post
Everything I buy gets cleaned before use too. SOmething I started doing after see my mother's b/f do it 15 years ago. Plus any shirt I get has creases from being folded, so I take it in to have it cleaned and pressed. Who knows what dirty hands have touched the shirt before I received it.

you never know the dry cleaning hands are dirty as well.

i mean, sitting in the back eating their baked fish and kimchi. going to the bathroom and/or sneezing and not washing their hands.
they touch your clothes and hang them and fold them.
cmon. as long as nothing visible, but microscopically? kimchi
post #75 of 94
I think the guy deserves a break. It is fairly common practice for many to wash a shirt before wearing it for the first time.

I recall it being discussed here (or the other place) that you are supposed to wash off the chemicals on a brand new shirt.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Dry Cleaner marked the tag on my high end shirts..should I complain?