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The OneShirt: A Phoenix from the Ashes [4/24/13 UPDATE: A SHIRTMAKER, AN ENGLISHMAN, CHAMBRAY,... - Page 62

post #916 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Or it was an intentional and honest choice, however ill-advised, by the fabric designers that wasn't then communicated forcefully enough to the sales people. This seems way more likely to me.

 

+1

 

I don't think the senior guys at SG are sitting in some hollowed out volcano, stroking their Persian cats, while plotting world economic domination via poly-blended shirts. Get real, guys.

post #917 of 1166
Thread Starter 
No, they just decided to make shirting out of really cheap yarns, lie to people that it's all cotton, and charge a monstrous premium on that fraudulent basis. That is a disgusting, and illegal, business practice--no matter how you cut it.

Also, keep in mind, the polyester content itself is not the only component that cheapens the fabric. Cotton used in a blend is not likely to be nice cotton. Think about it. Where does the fuzz come from? There is no magic weaving technique. It's just plain-woven. It's obviously the fibers used.
post #918 of 1166
Then why wouldn't they do the same for their pocket squares?
post #919 of 1166
do we know the price that SG sells the fabric to the trade at?
i do not. so there could have been a very large mark up added by the price by he assorted distributors, and shirtmakers..

I know of a mill in Europe that is off the radar.. They produce an excellent 80% cotton/20% poly shirting.
I even made one up for myself years ago. Poly/cotton makes me very hot. I did not wear the shirt that often.
but as a blend, i was very impressed. much better then the liquid ammonia dipped 100% cotton wrinkle free shirts
a quality blend does exist. But blends in this country are considered very low quality. Most were very low quality.

maybe this work shirt chambray was woven with Poly so the workers would not have to spend too much time ironing out a shirt in the morning.

I would guess that the fabric was developed because certain French unions wanted their workers to wear garments produced in France. from fabric to finished product.
this is only an educated guess.
at some point someone thought it would be "cool" to make a dress shirt from this fabric.
someone else of sartorial influence saw the shirt and wanted one. this is how trends are started.

go look at SWD. they have been wearing "chambray" shirts for years.

going back to the original point of this one shirt thread.
I suggested using an End on end. or a finer version of pinpoint oxford.
the chambray would look dated in another year. Trends have there expatriation date.
While a truly classic fabric could be worn until the shirt needs to be retired, or have collars and cuffs replaced.

do you all remember when the Italians wore nothing but French Blue end on end?
where is that trend now?
post #920 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

No, they just decided to make shirting out of really cheap yarns, lie to people that it's all cotton, and charge a monstrous premium on that fraudulent basis. That is a disgusting, and illegal, business practice--no matter how you cut it.

 

Chill out. You love going from one extreme to the other.

post #921 of 1166

It's very funny how the shirting went from singular to crap by just acknowledging that it has poly in it.

post #922 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

do we know the price that SG sells the fabric to the trade at?
i do not. so there could have been a very large mark up added by the price by he assorted distributors, and shirtmakers..

I know of a mill in Europe that is off the radar.. They produce an excellent 80% cotton/20% poly shirting.
I even made one up for myself years ago. Poly/cotton makes me very hot. I did not wear the shirt that often.
but as a blend, i was very impressed. much better then the liquid ammonia dipped 100% cotton wrinkle free shirts
a quality blend does exist. But blends in this country are considered very low quality. Most were very low quality.

maybe this work shirt chambray was woven with Poly so the workers would not have to spend too much time ironing out a shirt in the morning.

I would guess that the fabric was developed because certain French unions wanted their workers to wear garments produced in France. from fabric to finished product.
this is only an educated guess.
at some point someone thought it would be "cool" to make a dress shirt from this fabric.http://www.styleforum.net/t/341010/the-oneshirt-a-phoenix-from-the-ashes-4-24-13-update-a-shirtmaker-an-englishman-chambray-and-fire/915#
someone else of sartorial influence saw the shirt and wanted one. this is how trends are started.

go look at SWD. they have been wearing "chambray" shirts for years.

going back to the original point of this one shirt thread.
I suggested using an End on end. or a finer version of pinpoint oxford.
the chambray would look dated in another year. Trends have there expatriation date.
While a truly classic fabric could be worn until the shirt needs to be retired, or have collars and cuffs replaced.

do you all remember when the Italians wore nothing but French Blue end on end?
where is that trend now?

This has got to be up there with the best posts on the forum.

just saying and all that.
post #923 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Victor Elfo View Post

It's very funny how the shirting went from singular to crap by just acknowledging that it has poly in it.

another very good, eloquent post (just incase this is misenterpreted; no sarcasm abides in these words.
post #924 of 1166
I can understand the attraction of the SG chambray, which for me is tied to the attraction of oxford cloth. I am looking for a lighter-weight alternative to oxford cloth, which both has a different texture than formal shirtings and can be worn with a buttondown collar and a tie.

I can also understand why mafoofan feels lied to -- Torsten himself gives the impression of being misled (www.the-journal-of-style.com/2013/05/01/chambray-gate/):
Quote:
When I half a year later placed an re-order, I received an invoice stating that the chambray was a blend of 80 percent cotton and 20 percent polyester.

I was surprised because I took for granted that it was a 100 percent cotton fabric, and I contacted Simonnot-Godard. They replied that the invoice wasn’t right. The chambray that contains 20 percent polyester is the rough denim like chambray (which I decided to skip). My chambray is pure cotton, Simonnot-Godard assured me.

Two weeks ago, I was contacted by Simonnot-Godard again, who told they were going to make a re-run of “the original chambray”. I asked for samples, and they arrived last week.

With discussions on Style Forum and Twitter in mind, I decided to write an email to Simonnot-Godard to further clarify, what this “new old chambray” is. Simonnot-Godard replied it is:

• Woven on 150 cms looms, not the old single width looms
• A blend of 80 percent cotton and 20 percent polyester “to make Toile Viellie Aspect”

They added that this is the chambray they have been supplying to shirtmakers in Southern Europe for 30 years. Rubinacci in Naples and Burgos in Madrid are among the customers.

In the email dialog we have, Simonnot-Godard also takes a new position on the chambray that I carry: it contains polyester too.
post #925 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

do we know the price that SG sells the fabric to the trade at?
i do not. so there could have been a very large mark up added by the price by he assorted distributors, and shirtmakers..

I know of a mill in Europe that is off the radar.. They produce an excellent 80% cotton/20% poly shirting.
I even made one up for myself years ago. Poly/cotton makes me very hot. I did not wear the shirt that often.
but as a blend, i was very impressed. much better then the liquid ammonia dipped 100% cotton wrinkle free shirts
a quality blend does exist. But blends in this country are considered very low quality. Most were very low quality.

maybe this work shirt chambray was woven with Poly so the workers would not have to spend too much time ironing out a shirt in the morning.

I would guess that the fabric was developed because certain French unions wanted their workers to wear garments produced in France. from fabric to finished product.
this is only an educated guess.
at some point someone thought it would be "cool" to make a dress shirt from this fabric.
someone else of sartorial influence saw the shirt and wanted one. this is how trends are started.

go look at SWD. they have been wearing "chambray" shirts for years.

going back to the original point of this one shirt thread.
I suggested using an End on end. or a finer version of pinpoint oxford.
the chambray would look dated in another year. Trends have there expatriation date.
While a truly classic fabric could be worn until the shirt needs to be retired, or have collars and cuffs replaced.

do you all remember when the Italians wore nothing but French Blue end on end?
where is that trend now?


For me is funny because some tisserand S-G use for to make tissus chemises S-G was tisserand en Belgique! Is no always honest déclaration origin of tissus!
post #926 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Thin Man View Post

I can understand the attraction of the SG chambray is tied to the attraction of oxford cloth. I am looking for a lighter-weight alternative to oxford cloth, which both has a different texture than formal shirtings and can be worn with a buttondown collar and a tie.

I can also understand why mafoofan feels lied to -- Torsten himself gives the impression of being misled (www.the-journal-of-style.com/2013/05/01/chambray-gate/):

any textured lined weave or some type of seersucker?
post #927 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

No, they just decided to make shirting out of really cheap yarns, lie to people that it's all cotton, and charge a monstrous premium on that fraudulent basis. That is a disgusting, and illegal, business practice--no matter how you cut it.

SG shambray?
post #928 of 1166
Am I the only person here who holds this esoteric piece of knowledge: American Apparel's poly-blend tee shirts (50% polyester) are way more expensive than their 100% cotton counterparts?
For a producer like SG, who sell low volumes, 20% polyester really isn't going to make them much money. As others have said, 100% cotton chambray can be had for $5/m.
post #929 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


SG shambray?

 

You're a funny guy. That's why Foo will kill you last.

post #930 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post

You're a funny guy. That's why Foo will kill you last.

Is Simonnot Godard now considered Dubiously Honored?
Edited by dieworkwear - 5/4/13 at 1:29pm
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