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The OneShirt: A Phoenix from the Ashes [4/24/13 UPDATE: A SHIRTMAKER, AN ENGLISHMAN, CHAMBRAY,... - Page 53

post #781 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

That was what I suggested somewhere in the thread. But that wld mean needing more than One(setof)Cufflinks. Though admittedly if there's only OneShirt then it shouldn't matter.


Will to be like divide by zero! baldy[1].giffoo.gif
post #782 of 1166
Kabbaz, foo.gif's favorite shirtmaker explains it here.

http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs018/1101478760242/archive/1102772493004.html

What makes voile voile-y is the twist.

As far as I know chambray is (strictly) defined only by the white weft.

For all I know they use the same word for both things in French (RJ, you out there?).



Fair warning - the articles on that site are great but the aesthetics of the website itself might make you gouge your eyes out with a butterknife
Edited by Cantabrigian - 4/26/13 at 1:31am
post #783 of 1166
You guys have to have realized by now that there's just not a single, universally accepted definition of "chambray."
post #784 of 1166
Do you want to know what is awesome? I will tell you. GQ has declared a one-square. Guess what. It is ---- chambray!!
post #785 of 1166
I really like the old SG Chambray stuff. Like a more rustic Oxford cloth. That may lead to the question of why not just make it easy and go for a traditional Oxford cloth as the one shirt fabric? That's what I might do. But then again, Foo never wanted it to be easy. :^)
post #786 of 1166
I think I might be wearing chambray today

chambray is white hot right now. foo.gif is leading the charge....

http://fashionista.com/2013/04/editors-pick-cheryls-chambray-shirt/

http://www.gq.com/style/blogs/the-gq-eye/2013/04/gq-endorses-chambray.

html

IT’S NOT OFTEN you hear men boasting about how worn-in their suits are. That may be about to change. A number of labels—from classic luxury brands like Valentino and Giorgio Armani to chic upstarts like AMI and Michael Bastian—are selling suits made of chambray, a relative of denim. A lightweight cloth densely woven with white and

indigo yarn in shades that can range from pale blue to dark gray, it’s associated more with Depression-era factory workers than business wear.

Chambray softens over time, which means your new suit could theoretically become as comfortable as your old jeans. “It flows naturally as you move,” said Giorgio Armani, by email. “I particularly like it because, while it is as rough and resistant as denim, it’s also light and fresh to the touch.”

That freshness makes the chambray suit an ideal option as the weather warms up. But with its suggestion of the “Canadian tuxedo” (the term for a denim jacket paired with jeans), head-to-toe chambray may require a mental leap.

Thankfully this crop of indigo two-pieces has little to do with the denim leisure suits of the 1970s and ’80s. “You can compare it to seersucker,” said Frank Muytjens, J.Crew’s head of men’s design. “It works in so many ways. It’s perfect for a wedding. It’s great to wear to work, even. It’s a very versatile fabric.” J.Crew debuted its first chambray suit this spring—cut in a rigid Japanese variety made in the denim capital of Kojima—and reports that it’s already a top seller. Details magazine fashion director Matthew Marden bought one recently. “I have a bunch of suits in cotton and light summer-weight wool. I was looking for something different,” he said.

This season’s chambray suits vary in degrees of formality. While Canali and J.Crew offer classic, sharp-shouldered two-button styles, Giorgio Armani and Michael Bastian’s skew more casual with fashion-forward silhouettes. Meanwhile AMI’s dark indigo suit is so soft and pliable you might think you could toss it in the washing machine. (You can’t.)

For some designers, the suit’s unfussy air is exactly the point. “We wanted to interpret something which is very street style into something with couture values,” said Pierpaolo Piccioli, who designs Valentino with Maria Grazia Chiuri. AMI designer Alexandre Mattiussi concurs: “I like the idea of keeping the elegance of the suiting, but we’re not trying to make it too sophisticated.”

Men looking to impress in a more executive setting should go with more classically tailored chambray looks. For them, the material’s breathability can be a boon. Matthew Moneypenny, CEO of image licensing agency Trunk Archive, says he will likely be packing one for a business trip to Portugal and Spain this summer. “It’s going to be brutally hot, but I need to look professional,” said Mr. Moneypenny. “A chambray suit serves the purpose. You can pull a chambray piece—whether it’s a shirt or a suit—out of a suitcase and hang it up, and it’s fine after a half-hour or so.” He added, “I can see a lot of my former colleagues at Hollywood agencies wearing them. Chambray suits read professional, but would also get you a lot of comments from clients interested in the look.”

Commercial-producer Luke Bryant, who’s based in Toronto but often works in Los Angeles, isn’t so sure. “Wearing a chambray suit to work might not exactly say ‘Make me partner,’ ” he said. Mr. Bryant would consider buying one for a different reason: “For me, outdoor summer weddings are really a celebration of my sweat glands,” he said. “If a lightweight chambray suit can keep me a bit cooler, I’m in.” Indeed, the summer wedding can be an ideal place for chambray, particularly if it’s outdoors, in a garden or at the beach.

Some men, however, are wary of wearing the more refined takes on chambray in any situation. “I think the dressier versions are a risky move and should probably stay on the runway,” said Chris Black, a brand strategist. “When styled well, the casual versions could look very cool.”

For others, like Theophilus London, a New York-based recording artist whose style has landed him in various fashion magazines, the material is out of the question when it comes to suiting. “I’m more of a classic suit guy,” said Mr. London. He added: “Chambray is over.”

This assertion made Mr. Bastian laugh. “That’s like saying denim is over,” he said. “Maybe for him it’s over, but these things don’t go away.”

Early indications point to tailored chambray’s staying power. Who knows? It might even inspire its own slang. “If denim-on-denim is the Canadian tuxedo, then the chambray suit is the new Brooklyn tux,” saidJon Jackson, a creative director for the global digital agency Huge. “It’s lightweight for the summertime but still dark enough to mean business.”

With a relaxed reputation but a wholly refined look, this suit can take you (different) places when topped off with the right touches
post #787 of 1166
Foo forwarded to me a sample of the new chambray. and i forwarded him a sample of SG chambray #2

the newest version of the SG chambray is still crap.
the fabric is single ply both ways
the white yarn is a low twist. I would guess it is a 40's yarn
the blue looks like a standard 50's yarn

saying the fabric has a dry hand is being diplomatic

I burned two fabrics the other day..
a basic 100/2 end on end . the burnt edges are smoth
New SG, the edges are crispy. it did not bubble, but the crisp edges mean it is not all cotton

the boys on SWD have been wearing chambray for at least the last 4 years.

as I have mentioned.
chambray can be in a work shirt quality. I wore those in 1974 along with levis and fry boots.

dress shirt chambray is usually woven in 60/1 when usual lower priced broadcloth was woven in 50/1
I also had chambray versions in voile. those were less see through then usual voile.

I will gladly perform this demonstration for anyone interested.
just bring some beer!
post #788 of 1166
Carl, just so I'm understanding correctly, are you saying the new stuff that Foo bought - the stuff on the right side of this picture - is also not 100% cotton?
post #789 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Carl, just so I'm understanding correctly, are you saying the new stuff that Foo bought - the stuff on the right side of this picture - is also not 100% cotton?

By my simple match test. It is not all cotton.
I have given foo the name of a reliable textile testing agency.
post #790 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

I have given foo the name of a reliable textile testing agency.
eh.gif
post #791 of 1166
Thread Starter 
I hear you Carl, and appreciate the time you put into this. However, I'm really not sure what to make of your report. Eugene burned the chambray in front of me. It burned exactly the same as the Alumno he had on hand. Both had crisp burnt edges, but both also crumbled into dusty ashes when rubbed.

The cotton/poly blend I burned behaved quite differently. You saw the video.
post #792 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

I hear you Carl, and appreciate the time you put into this. However, I'm really not sure what to make of your report. Eugene burned the chambray in front of me. It burned exactly the same as the Alumno he had on hand. Both had crisp burnt edges, but both also crumbled into dusty ashes when rubbed.

The cotton/poly blend I burned behaved quite differently. You saw the video.

Eugene also told you the fabric was 2/ply

take out yarns both ways and twist back and forth to see if they separate. into 2 distinct yarns.

did he burn the entire piece or did he blow it out so you could feel the burnt edge of the fabric?
post #793 of 1166
Thread Starter 
He blew it out so we could examine the edges.

He used a magnifying glass to determine if it was two ply.
post #794 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

He blew it out so we could examine the edges.

He used a magnifying glass to determine if it was two ply.

did you feel the edges?
a magnifying glass?????
no. you pull out a yarn.. you twist tit back and forth. if it seperates into two yarns .. it is two ply.. if it just sort of mushes apart.
it is not...

I guess the fact that i have sold textiles for over 25 years doesn't mean much.

come down to my shop i still have the snips. I will show you how it is done.
I will twist the yarns
then
I will burn a small piece and you will feel crispy edges
I will burn something that is all cotton and you will feel a smooth edge.

Why do you insist on making a lot of expensive shirts from fabric, that no decent shirtmaker would even buy.
post #795 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

By my simple match test. It is not all cotton.
I have given foo the name of a reliable textile testing agency.

I expect the mass spec results, including the positive and negative control.
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Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The OneShirt: A Phoenix from the Ashes [4/24/13 UPDATE: A SHIRTMAKER, AN ENGLISHMAN, CHAMBRAY, AND FIRE]