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The OneShirt: A Phoenix from the Ashes [4/24/13 UPDATE: A SHIRTMAKER, AN ENGLISHMAN, CHAMBRAY,... - Page 26

post #376 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaplan View Post

The only shirt of mine I can recall without a gauntlet button is a bespoke one, and I remember feeling that something was missing, so I got 'em on the following orders. Having short gauntlets will just make it really hard to roll up your sleeves past the elbow (as you should, if you've started rolling), if either the sleeves are fairly trim or if you have anything besides the slimmest of arms. I have RTW shirts *with* gauntlet buttons that are hard to roll, unbuttoned.

How often do you roll-up your French cuffed sleeves? It seems like an odd consideration. Anyway, I am able to roll mine up above my elbow, with short, no-button gauntlets. No matter how long the gauntlet, it will not go that high--so, the key is how the sleeves are cut.
Quote:
Originally Posted by msulinski View Post

I don't really roll up my dress shirt sleeves anyway, so I don't care about gauntlet length. I do roll casual shirts, but then I don't care about a gauntlet button on those, or rather, I don't care about exposing what the gauntlet button covers up.

Exactly. smile.gif
post #377 of 1166

Quote:
Originally Posted by sinfjotli View Post

- you claim that when wearing patterns, two or three are the best (http://www.tweedinthecity.com/2013/02/01/pattern-matching-have-some-principles/)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

You are dead-on correct. This is why the OneShirt can never be the only shirt in my wardrobe.

 

Does this FooRule hold with Shephard's check ties and other formalities?

 

 

Also, bloggers intimate that the single cuff is a bit of italian style: http://www.permanentstyle.co.uk/2007/12/poor-single-cuff.html#.UU8SJaWMXww

post #378 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

How often do you roll-up your French cuffed sleeves?

I never wear french cuffs, don't like 'em which is why i suggested going with barrel cuffs above. I know it's very situational how appropriate/expected french cuffs are, but for the most part they strike me as being too fussy so I prefer the simplicity of a buttoned cuff.

As for being able to roll shirt sleeves, I'd rather have the option and not use it than the other way around. Plus I like the look of a gauntlet button. Of course, if you either don't roll your sleeves or if you can do so comfortably with a shorter gauntlet, it sounds like you'll be fine without gauntlet buttons.
post #379 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbeFroeman View Post

Does this FooRule hold with Shephard's check ties and other formalities?

Yes. The way to navigate a situation where you are only wearing two patterns is to mitigate against them looking paired. We all know to avoid making them the same color, and most of us know to avoid the same pattern type, but what matters just as much is the density of the pattern. If you can successfully differentiate the two patterns along all three of those measures, it will look fine. It's just much harder to do because there are more variables that must be more carefully controlled for.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbeFroeman View Post

Also, bloggers intimate that the single cuff is a bit of italian style: http://www.permanentstyle.co.uk/2007/12/poor-single-cuff.html#.UU8SJaWMXww

That sounds like an Englishman's fantasy of what Italians do. Italians generally don't wear linked cuffs at all. When they do, it seems they wear double cuffs, like the rest of us. Maybe this was different before, but can't remember seeing any single cuffs on my last few trips to Italy. If there is an Italian around (Radicaldog?), I bet he could clear this up.
post #380 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaplan View Post

I never wear french cuffs, don't like 'em which is why i suggested going with barrel cuffs above. I know it's very situational how appropriate/expected french cuffs are, but for the most part they strike me as being too fussy so I prefer the simplicity of a buttoned cuff.

This raises an interesting point I've wanted to touch on: the fussiness of French versus barrel cuffs. I see how the addition of a cufflink can be seen as an unnecessary embellishment, thus making French cuffs fussier than they would be without them. However, I'm not sure that, as a whole, French cuffs are more fussy. Barrel cuffs necessarily fit much closer to the wrist (or they should when they are fit properly). French cuffs are looser. So, to me, they appear more relaxed and at ease.

So, I think French cuffs are seen as fussy due to their implied formality, not anything intrinsic about their aesthetics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaplan View Post

As for being able to roll shirt sleeves, I'd rather have the option and not use it than the other way around. Plus I like the look of a gauntlet button. Of course, if you either don't roll your sleeves or if you can do so comfortably with a shorter gauntlet, it sounds like you'll be fine without gauntlet buttons.

Again, I just don't see how a longer gauntlet helps you roll your sleeve up. If the goal is to get the sleeve rolled up above the elbow, no gauntlet will be long enough to accommodate. The shape and fit of the sleeve are what will make that possible.
post #381 of 1166
I'm not trying to convince you of anything, just expressing my preferences based on own experiences. If the sleeves are the correct lenght a barrel cuff doesn't nedd to be as tight as I think you allude to.

I wonder how many others see french cuffs as 'more relaxed'?

As for the last point, I can roll the sleeves comfortably past the elbows on most of my shirts, but not with the gauntlet button closed, so at least IME it does make a difference.
post #382 of 1166
Thread Starter 
The barrel cuff has to fit relatively snugly to look good. Sleeve length only helps determine where it sits on your wrist. When the cuff is not closely fit, it looks loose and sloppy.

Since the shape of a French cuff is not circular and does not follow the circumference of your wrist, it can afford to be much looser without looking wrong.
post #383 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaplan View Post

I wonder how many others see french cuffs as 'more relaxed'?

 


I think foo means that French cuffs can be more relaxed in terms of fit than barrel cuffs due to their shape. Not to be mistaken with relaxed in the sense of casual.

 

Not even foo would argue that french cuffs are inherently far far more formal than barrel cuffs.

post #384 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by clapeyron View Post



I think foo means that French cuffs can be more relaxed in terms of fit than barrel cuffs due to their shape. Not to be mistaken with relaxed in the sense of casual.

Not even foo would argue that french cuffs are inherently far far more formal than barrel cuffs.

Exactly.

Though, I'm not sure I like the whole "not even Foo" bit. smile.gif
post #385 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Yes. The way to navigate a situation where you are only wearing two patterns is to mitigate against them looking paired. We all know to avoid making them the same color, and most of us know to avoid the same pattern type, but what matters just as much is the density of the pattern. If you can successfully differentiate the two patterns along all three of those measures, it will look fine. It's just much harder to do because there are more variables that must be more carefully controlled for.
That sounds like an Englishman's fantasy of what Italians do. Italians generally don't wear linked cuffs at all. When they do, it seems they wear double cuffs, like the rest of us. Maybe this was different before, but can't remember seeing any single cuffs on my last few trips to Italy. If there is an Italian around (Radicaldog?), I bet he could clear this up.

I know I have upset you but earlier in this thread I already explained that nowadays both RTW and bespoke, if you ask to see Polsini da gemelli, they may show you the single cuff, and if bespoke, most will ask you if you would like the hidden button on a link to make it transformable. An Italian blog on shirt and ties even say that people prefer them because thay are more comfortable and easy and it helps give a reined look when wearing more casual. As I said it is a recent trend that people started revising cuff links and other accessories, probably started around 2003. If you interact with the traditional professionals in Italy, like lawyers , notary public, doctors, you will see plenty of them wearing single cuff with links.

Also there must be a big difference between European and US shirtmakers, as all the RTW FCC shirts I have seen here all have no gauntlet buttons, i have seen most recently Charvet, Hawes & Curtis, TM Lewin and others. On bespoke, without me specifying, on my FC and convertible single cuff never got the button but for my Donn'Anna, and for the two 3 only shirt with barrel/non convertible cuffs, I got the button, never asked for the diference, but noticed that in both case works best as made..
post #386 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by NORE View Post

When a member posts another members pics, that just seems wrong for a variety of reasons. Just sayin'

It has been said before that it's fair game to post stuff from the SF "public domain" for educational purposes. If he wants me to take it down, I'll gladly honor the request. biggrin.gif
post #387 of 1166
I was thinking more along the lines of having a categorized cache of member fits uhoh.gif
post #388 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcodalondra View Post

An Italian blog on shirt and ties

Would you mind to share which blog you are referring to? I would like to have a look.
post #389 of 1166
Bespoke button-down (Charles Nakhle). Tessitura Monti oxford.



post #390 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Thanks for showing that--I think I'd want a wider spread BD with more roll.
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