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The OneShirt: A Phoenix from the Ashes [4/24/13 UPDATE: A SHIRTMAKER, AN ENGLISHMAN, CHAMBRAY,... - Page 14

post #196 of 1166
Thread Starter 
It's lighter. A very minor, incremental benefit? Sure. But that is the case with so many things.
post #197 of 1166
sounds rather princess and the peaish but if it works for you
post #198 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

sounds rather princess and the peaish

It really is, but I'm cool with that.
post #199 of 1166
I, too have a Oneshirt™©®. You know the brand and I will state that the line is Regent, which specifies the collar. I love a stiff yet comfortable collar and these come with contrast collars or self collars. Self double or single cuffs. They are available in classic or custom configurations with the latter being slimmer. Observe one of my faves:


Click for moar! (Click to show)











The beauty is I spend on average $40 per shirt which is great since I consider dress shirts disposable. I have had some last ~10 years with continuous use.
post #200 of 1166
Thread Starter 
What's a "self double or single cuff?"

Also, those collar points are too short.
post #201 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

What's a "self double or single cuff?"

Also, those collar points are too short.

Meaning the cuffs aren't white in the case of a contrast collar. That pic with the cardigan is deceiving. The others all have the exact same collar and they routinely fall below my lapels which is a personal peeve.

Do you like a stiff collar or relaxed?
post #202 of 1166
Thread Starter 
I like my collars as soft and light as possible.
post #203 of 1166
So no interfacing?
post #204 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Not none. I just like it light and soft.
post #205 of 1166
I find it difficult to deal with a soft collar. I like mine stiff and standing up straight. The soft ones tend to roll as the day wears on.
post #206 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Rather than grip at the wrist, it sits on the brim of your hand. Much more comfortable. Also, I conjecture that it consequently helps the sleeve drape better.

I haven't found that the grip of the cuff helps with sleeve drape (ie. sleeves disappearing up the coat's sleeves). The height of the shirt's armhole relative to the coat along with the fit of the shirt seem to affect it more. Even wearing a thick-ass watch like an IWC 3706 (yes, it's not thick compared to the monstrosities in vogue these days) without an adjustment to the cuff diameter doesn't affect it too much unless the cuff gets caught up on the watch itself.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Not my cup of tea, but here is a Paul Stuart shirt in what they call "chambray," with French cuffs and a white collar to boot: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

This looks like the first "chambray" that Will sold, that turned out to be voile. I like that SG voile, too. The actual chambray seems like it's halfway to denim, by comparison.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RDiaz View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)




(these pictures show the unfastened cuff, with the button in the "barrel" position, then passed through the buttonhole so it becomes "invisible" and ready for links)

I must just not get the appeal of casual single cuffs, and these pictures show exactly why. They look like someone's home craft project, especially with the button cuff links. Single-cuffs only look right to me in the context of formalwear: stiff interlining, white cloth, metallic links. To paraphrase our resident (young) architect, the design of the cuff is inauthentic to the material used --- it's trying to pretend to be something it's not.
post #207 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

I haven't found that the grip of the cuff helps with sleeve drape (ie. sleeves disappearing up the coat's sleeves).

I don't mean that a barrel cuff will cause the sleeve to ride up your arm. As you point out, other factors such as armhole height matter more in that regard. However, a well-fit barrel cuff tends to exert upward tension on the sleeve, since it must grip your wrist laterally rather than sit on your hand. Consequently, the sleeve fabric tends not to fall as freely to the cuff. That's what I mean by drape in this context.
Quote:
Originally Posted by A Y View Post

I must just not get the appeal of casual single cuffs, and these pictures show exactly why. They look like someone's home craft project, especially with the button cuff links. Single-cuffs only look right to me in the context of formalwear: stiff interlining, white cloth, metallic links. To paraphrase our resident (young) architect, the design of the cuff is inauthentic to the material used --- it's trying to pretend to be something it's not.

I'm not sure I understand why a single cuff in a non-formal context would be inauthentic to the material used. If you want a stiffer, cleaner look, it is a matter of choosing a heavier, thicker interlining, not the type of shirting. The above examples are all convertible cuffs, so they don't reflect the ideal form for a single cuff. On the matter of links: I'm confused as to how that influences your judgment of single cuffs. You can pick the sort you like, metallic or not.
post #208 of 1166
Take voile! No chambray!

For cuff you must to take elegant style of single button! No take single cuffs for boutons de manchette!

Riva make 170/2 chaîne and trame for 100% cotton, for mix cotton-linen Riva make 170/2 cotton chaîne with single fibre linen trame!


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post #209 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Salvatore?
post #210 of 1166
I think hws isw actually an edmorel sock
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