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The OneShirt: A Phoenix from the Ashes [4/24/13 UPDATE: A SHIRTMAKER, AN ENGLISHMAN, CHAMBRAY,... - Page 74

post #1096 of 1166
...and it would be invisible when buttoned up for a tie.
post #1097 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Honestly, we like too many things on this forum now, and hate too little. What happened to being discerning?

I discern that the selvedge detailing is awful. I know, it's not supposed to be a business-correct shirt. But isn't the selvedge the strongest part of the fabric? Why not deploy it strategically, such as near stressed seams? As is, it is entirely too fetishistic to be tasteful.
post #1098 of 1166

I tend to be less discerning for casual wear. If I saw someone wearing that shirt on a business setting I'd kill him though.

 

There's still a tolerance threshold. I hate contrasting double collars and buttonholes with a passion, even for casual.

post #1099 of 1166

Hate the selvedge.

post #1100 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

This is pretty dope

Chambray caz by Vanda
http://blog.vandafineclothing.com/post/52859218921/selvedge-chambray-buttondown-bespoke-for-g-s

tumblr_mobtjuwPOH1r11940o1_1280.jpg

tumblr_mobtjuwPOH1r11940o3_1280.jpg

Fabric looks nice too - for a certain use.
agreed. Is Gerald making these shirts, or was it a one off?
post #1101 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Honestly, we like too many things on this forum now, and hate too little. What happened to being discerning?

I discern that the selvedge detailing is awful. I know, it's not supposed to be a business-correct shirt. But isn't the selvedge the strongest part of the fabric? Why not deploy it strategically, such as near stressed seams? As is, it is entirely too fetishistic to be tasteful.

I personally don't care for the selvedge, but how is visible, nubby handstitching not equally fetishistic?
post #1102 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by clapeyron 
for me this is the detail that prevents the shirt from being worn with a jacket. for chambray shirts to not be limited to casual wear they have to have only few details and a decent collar.



that selvedge strap to me is like a buttoned V-pocket on a plain white dress shirt.

For me, the fabric already limits it to casual.

I find myself uncharacteristically unbothered by the selvedge on an obviously casual shirt.
post #1103 of 1166
I have a selvege chambray shirt (links way upthread somewhere), though the selvege line is on the underside of the placket and is not visible unless you look on the inside of the shirt.
post #1104 of 1166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I personally don't care for the selvedge, but how is visible, nubby handstitching not equally fetishistic?

Oh it is, but it is less noticeably so. Also, there is nothing else you could do with those stitches. You could, theoretically, do something better with the selvedge.
post #1105 of 1166
If they used the selvedge somewhere else and tried to claim it was designed to improve the durability of the shirt, most here would immediately call bullshit.

post #1106 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Oh it is, but it is less noticeably so. Also, there is nothing else you could do with those stitches. You could, theoretically, do something better with the selvedge.

I don't know. I think selvedge and handstitching are more or less just fetishistic details for clothing nerds. There's some "rationalization" for them - selvedge is more durable, handstitching aids movement in certain areas. Parts of those are true, but those reasons seem pretty secondary to their main function: things to obsess over if you care about old ways of creating clothes. Nubby hand stitches on shirts and trousers are just decorative, and as you know, are often reinforced with machine stitching anyway.

If handstitching is too subtle of a detail, you can take waterfall shoulder heads. There's tons of stuff we obsess over that serves no real function but to advertise to the world "this is something different, this is something special." There's nothing wrong with that, IMO. We can like clothes for the things they represent and for the ways they were created. Not every detail has to have a practical function behind it.

I don't care for the selvedge detail personally, but I don't think it's anything more than personal taste.
post #1107 of 1166
Real talk.
post #1108 of 1166
I'm fine with that shirt as a casual, Summer shirt. I don't mind the selvedge as at least the colors work well together. It could have been purple or yellow or something truly ostentatious. A guy wearing that shirt is still dressed better than the large majority of guys out there.
post #1109 of 1166
Here's C. Davidson using the selvedge down a pair of trousers

http://thetrad.blogspot.com/2012/05/opportunity-at-andover.html
post #1110 of 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I don't know. I think selvedge and handstitching are more or less just fetishistic details for clothing nerds. There's some "rationalization" for them - selvedge is more durable, handstitching aids movement in certain areas. Parts of those are true, but those reasons seem pretty secondary to their main function: things to obsess over if you care about old ways of creating clothes. Nubby hand stitches on shirts and trousers are just decorative, and as you know, are often reinforced with machine stitching anyway.

If handstitching is too subtle of a detail, you can take waterfall shoulder heads. There's tons of stuff we obsess over that serves no real function but to advertise to the world "this is something different, this is something special." There's nothing wrong with that, IMO. We can like clothes for the things they represent and for the ways they were created. Not every detail has to have a practical function behind it.

I don't care for the selvedge detail personally, but I don't think it's anything more than personal taste.

I think some of the obsession with showy details derives from insecurity: If I've paid so much for this bespoke item, I damn well want something that announces it. I admit to having to fight that urge at times.

One caveat. I don't think this applies to Foo at all, as I've not seen even the tiniest bit of insecurity in him.

Rob
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