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White Ressentiment, the Poster Child - Page 22

post #316 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post

I'd assume a lot of folks going to Ivies are getting a good bit of aide.

yep. All of the Ivies have fairly comparable financial aid programs and they are very generous. No academic or athletic scholarships, though.

the real rip off in private college comes when you go to a school out of the "top 35" or so as they give scholarships to the top few, but don't have nearly as good financial aid programs as the Ivys. Then you're just paying huge bucks for no-name.
post #317 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by hopkins_student View Post

triple post
Whoa, congrats, man! smile.gif
post #318 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

yep. All of the Ivies have fairly comparable financial aid programs and they are very generous. No academic or athletic scholarships, though.


While there are no "official" athletic scholarships at the Ivies, they do have other ways of taking care of their star athletes through various means such as paid internships with alums, etc.
post #319 of 440
I'm at that age where we observe where the kids and friend's kids go.

I have a few friend's that have children who went to Harvard. They said that Harvard, and I assume most of the Ivies, are "need based". Isn't this code speak for don't worry about the money if you get in?

I went to Rice U here in Houston, Tx. My class was the last one with zero tuition, $00 for everyone. It was in the 1960s Today Rice charges tuition, but is pretty much need based like the Ivies. If you get in you won't drop out over finances.

I have heard of differences though. The people I know that have gone to Harvard have said it is much harder getting in than staying in. At Rice, not so much like that.

And in an ironic sense, I have a feeling that drop out rates are higher in lower tier schools than in the uppermost tiers. There are obviously reasons for this. Anyone care to do a Google research and cite something?
post #320 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post

I'm at that age where we observe where the kids and friend's kids go.

I have a few friend's that have children who went to Harvard. They said that Harvard, and I assume most of the Ivies, are "need based". Isn't this code speak for don't worry about the money if you get in?

I went to Rice U here in Houston, Tx. My class was the last one with zero tuition, $00 for everyone. It was in the 1960s Today Rice charges tuition, but is pretty much need based like the Ivies. If you get in you won't drop out over finances.

I have heard of differences though. The people I know that have gone to Harvard have said it is much harder getting in than staying in. At Rice, not so much like that.

And in an ironic sense, I have a feeling that drop out rates are higher in lower tier schools than in the uppermost tiers. There are obviously reasons for this. Anyone care to do a Google research and cite something?

Need based basically means, "If your family assets are below some threshold set by the college, we will give you aid." For example, I think Princeton says if your family income is < 96,000 or something, you get a 100% tuition scholarship. Ivy League schools' huge endowments make this possible, because they still have a few kids in each class paying sticker, lots of name recognition, lots of incoming donations, and a strong alumni network.
post #321 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

according to another article, she had an SAT score of 2120, which I'm pretty sure is at or below the 25th percentile for Princeton, Yale, and Penn (schools she was rejected from according to the same article.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/teen-writes-controversial-op-ed-ivy-league-schools-article-1.1308211

Funny as hell. Try raising an Asian kid in the NYC or SF Metro. Much worse then being a white kid from the midwest with respect to chances of entry into top tier schools.

With regards to financial aide, once again the upper middle class are screwed. My friends make decent income, drive Toyotas/Hondas/Hyundais, live pretty conservatively, but don't get a dime of financial aide because they make around the mythical Obama cutoff for rich people.
post #322 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

i agree with you to an extent. A lazy Princeton grad won't amount to much. But in some of the most desireable and competitive companies in "prized" industries such as banking, trading, management consulting, some advertising, tech (google, apple and the like), that hard working Penn State grad is going to have their work cut out for them when it comes to breaking in over that hard working Princeton grad who just has to use the on campus resume drop to get an interview.

Yeah, I was so naive in college. I never realized how difficult it was to score an interview at Bain, Goldman, etc.
post #323 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post

Need based basically means, "If your family assets are below some threshold set by the college, we will give you aid." For example, I think Princeton says if your family income is < 96,000 or something, you get a 100% tuition scholarship. Ivy League schools' huge endowments make this possible, because they still have a few kids in each class paying sticker, lots of name recognition, lots of incoming donations, and a strong alumni network.


from the Princeton website:

Table1.png
post #324 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by norcaltransplant View Post

Funny as hell. Try raising an Asian kid in the NYC or SF Metro. Much worse then being a white kid from the midwest with respect to chances of entry into top tier schools.

yep. AZNs have it the hardest.
post #325 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

from the Princeton website:

Table1.png

Thanks. Was just going off memory from a figure I saw years ago, didn't care to look it up exactly. A mind-boggling amount of money for student aid and tuition. Lord.
post #326 of 440
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

yep. AZNs have it the hardest.

Stop dragging us into your pity party!
post #327 of 440
i aint AZN.


I did work in admissions for a bit though while i was a student. I found it fascinating.
post #328 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post

Thanks. Was just going off memory from a figure I saw years ago, didn't care to look it up exactly. A mind-boggling amount of money for student aid and tuition. Lord.

it's huge. All of this stuff happened in the past few years, too. Right after I graduated (not that it mattered, just go figure with the timing).

Most of the Ivies will match financial aid offers from other Ivies plus Stanford, MIT, Duke, etc. I believe that roughly half, if not a tad more, of students go through without any aid. They either don't qualify or don't bother applying.
post #329 of 440
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadly7 View Post

Need based basically means, "If your family assets are below some threshold set by the college, we will give you aid." For example, I think Princeton says if your family income is < 96,000 or something, you get a 100% tuition scholarship. Ivy League schools' huge endowments make this possible, because they still have a few kids in each class paying sticker, lots of name recognition, lots of incoming donations, and a strong alumni network.

Never thought of it this way. As to the Princeton example above.

So this theoretically means if your parents make about $,350,000 let's say, and you are admitted to Princeton ( without a sibling at a college ), then you would probably be responsible for the full costs or thereabouts ( basically $51,000+ annually )

I guess you could get student loans and such but they would have to be repaid, as opposed to the grants which do not have to be repaid.

So we have another irony, if a student from a lower middle class family ( making $60,000 annually or less ) gets into Princeton then it's a great financial bargain. If a student from a single chid family making about $350,000 a year gets in then it might be a big financial imposition.
post #330 of 440
If there is a group Princeton is looking to exclude it is definitely the 350k/year family.
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