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Salary Negotiations

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I am jumping the gun a little bit (I still haven't taken the test yet), but I was wondering how people go about negotiating salaries. When I got offered the job, I was offered a quite nice salary that I was perfectly satisfied with and accepted. I had always heard that you're supposed to ask for a higher one, if only out of principle. However, I've never done this for fear of looking like a pompous jackass and subsequently getting denied the job.

So how is it done? Do you seriously go balls-out and flatly demand a higher price? Is there a tactful way to do this?
post #2 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augustus Medici View Post
I am jumping the gun a little bit (I still haven't taken the test yet), but I was wondering how people go about negotiating salaries. When I got offered the job, I was offered a quite nice salary that I was perfectly satisfied with and accepted. I had always heard that you're supposed to ask for a higher one, if only out of principle. However, I've never done this for fear of looking like a pompous jackass and subsequently getting denied the job.

So how is it done? Do you seriously go balls-out and flatly demand a higher price? Is there a tactful way to do this?

I think it's situational. The notion taht you should always ask for more than is offered is about as sensible as saying you should always wear black shoes at night or that you should always wait three days after the first date before calling someone.

That said, if you're inclined to ask I don't think you need to be embarrassed about it. The tactful way of going about it, imho, is to be direct (I assume we're talking about a theoretical situation where you have not yet accepted an offer that included a specific compensation figure) and say something like "I think it's an exciting opporunity and I'm very interested, but I was really looking for a salary of $XXXX." Depending on the situation, another approach (if you think there's not likely to be much flexibility on salary per se) is to negotiate a better deal on non-salary items.
post #3 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post
Depending on the situation, another approach (if you think there's not likely to be much flexibility on salary per se) is to negotiate a better deal on non-salary items.

For example, an 1/8th of dank with every paycheck.
post #4 of 20
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
For example, an 1/8th of dank with every paycheck.

Jeeze an eighth every two weeks only comes out to a $1200 boost/yr. I would ask for at least a $2K increase if I was to negotiate at all!
post #6 of 20
If they're smart they'll give you all your raises in weed, knowing it will kill your motivation to ask for further raises.
post #7 of 20
ask them if you can expense out a pair of lobbs or fams every quarter.
post #8 of 20
my present emplyer made me an offer so generous, I didn't even think of negotiating. I was all set to negotiate, I literally had prepared lists and charts of what to ask for and so on, and then, when I got th offer, I just decided that I couldn't argue in good faith.

you don't have to negotiate. but the rule to negotiating is that you have to mean what you say - if you say that it isn't enough, then you should be ready to walk away. the best advice I ahve heard on this is not to say anything

HR "and our offer is X"
you - silence
30 seconds pass
HR- what do you think?
you - oh, I have to say I am a little suprised. I was just collecting my thoughts.
HR - well, we do have a little discretionary ability, maybe I could raise that by $5K
you - silence
HR - or maybe $8K
you - well, I guess that would be alreaght. my boss seemed very nice, and money isn't everything....
post #9 of 20
The latest episode of The Office actually has some great advice. Watch it here: http://www.tv-links.co.uk/link.do/1/103/263/15597/25723
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
HR "and our offer is X"
you - silence
30 seconds pass
HR- what do you think?
you - oh, I have to say I am a little suprised. I was just collecting my thoughts.
HR - well, we do have a little discretionary ability, maybe I could raise that by $5K
you - silence
HR - or maybe $8K
you - well, I guess that would be alreaght. my boss seemed very nice, and money isn't everything....
GT speaks the truth here. And the key, frankly, is the silence. Once HR voices the offer, first dude to speak loses. So keep your mouth shut 'til you like what you're hearing.

Buuuuuuttttttttttt, you got that little "test" thingy to deal with first, so don't go spending them newfound dollars.
post #11 of 20
It does depend. Don't go cheap in your opener. Asking for more than what you should get shows some ambition. But as others have mentioned, you need to mean it if you say you will walk away.
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice everyone. Now, if it is situational like most of you are saying, exactly what is the situation then? How do you know if something is just non-negotiable? Will they tell you straight-up?
post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augustus Medici View Post
Thanks for the advice everyone. Now, if it is situational like most of you are saying, exactly what is the situation then? How do you know if something is just non-negotiable? Will they tell you straight-up?

Rarely is anything non-negotiable. Great advice on the silence part, but the key is coming across with conviction and confidence.
post #14 of 20
My view is, if you are happy with what they are offering you, then take it. If not, then consider negotiation. If they're obviously not really that interested and more take it or leave it, then obviously, take it, or leave it. I've negotiated raises in the same way. More or less told them this is what I wanted, and when I didn't get it, left and went to a different company for a higher position with higher compensation than what I was asking for.
post #15 of 20
Anything is negotiable, much less salary.

If you are in a position where they need you more than you need them, surely ask for more.

That said, there is nothing wrong with not negotiating. You need to go into it knowing what your minimum reserve is, the point below which you will walk away (you also gotta have another offer on the table to do so safely) Also have a ballpark figure of what your max is.

My experience is to ask for more, they'll negotiate down, then you up a bit, and finally a good salary.

You can also negotiate non-money items such as perks, vacations...etc.
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