or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › ***The Not Even Slightly Official SW+D Booze and Cocktail Thread***
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

***The Not Even Slightly Official SW+D Booze and Cocktail Thread*** - Page 9

post #121 of 367
ugh, just reading about vodka makes me sick.

also, rum. got a couple bottles of this when i went to jamaica freshman year and now i can't touch the stuff...

post #122 of 367
drink less, drink better
post #123 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpackpockpuck View Post

drink less, drink better

meh, i'll take on that approach when i'm out of school.
post #124 of 367
haha, but it sounds like at the rate you're going there won't be any liquors left for you that don't turn your stomach when you think about them

i know that feeling, by the way. i got really sick from vodka years ago and it still makes me cringe when i smell it. luckily that hasn't happened with other liquors.
post #125 of 367
Yeah, Wray & Nephew is pretty wild stuff. 126 proof, and very, very funky. Far and away the most popular rum in Jamaica (as opposed to Appleton, which is probably the most popular Jamaican rum outside of Jamaica). In-country, they drink with a homegrown grapefruit soda called Ting... it's similar to grapefruit Jarritos. Tasty stuff.
post #126 of 367
My favorite cheap vodka is Tito's. Not Smirnoff cheap, but Tito's has the best, cleanest flavor of any vodka I've had the pleasure of mixing, and it is under $20 for a 750 mL bottle here in Ohio.

I don't drink vodka at home though... I've had a bottle of Stoli Elit for looks for a while. I think it's full save for one shot or so.

I've been making lots of Sidecars recently... Here's my recipe:

4 parts brandy (I use Courvoisier Exclusif. Almost out of it too, I need to restock)
1 part Cointreau
1 part Grand Marnier
2 parts lemon juice

Sorry about the shitty picture, and the cluttered desk, but here's what it looks like:



Phenomenal drink, and two or three will get you feeling good.
post #127 of 367
God I used that overproof rum in London when we were making mojitos (sans ice, we didn't really have a fridge). It was one of the worst liquors i've ever had.
post #128 of 367
Certainly marketing gets in the way of a lot of great products (and not so great stuff too... See almost any major tequila brand). I'm just saying that a lot of amari/bitters/herbals taste good (to me) and should be treated as any other spirit when it comes to making cocktails.

I do agree that when it comes to fresh juice and amari, one should almost always be using only lemon.

Anyways... Any chartreuse fans here? I'm always pestering anyone I know going to France to bring me back bottles of Elixir Vegetal. Nectar of the gods. Or monks, but still.
post #129 of 367
Thanks everyone for your input!

I can reciprocate with with some info about wine -- today: Brunello di Montalcino.

DOCG
Grapes: Sangiovese 100%
ABV: 12.5%

Brunello is produced in a very small region ~40 km south of Siena from Sangiovese grapes exclusively; actually, grapes growing in that region are different (bigger, fuller) from other Sangiovese grapes used to produce i.e. Chianti. It's one of the most expensive Italian wines and, together with Barolo, one of those with the greatest longevity.

After fermentation, the wine is first aged in oak barrels for at least 2 years, then again for at least 4 months in a bottle before selling is permitted no earlier than 5 years from the harvest vintage. Brunello Riserva ages at least 6 months in a bottle, and cannot be sold before 6 years from the harvest year.

I don't know abut availability, but some vineyards (that is, producers) have already started trading all over the world. Banfi is certainly active in the US, although they produce a wine quite dissimilar from actual Brunello (I believe they tried to make it more palatable/sweet/whatever). Also avoid Antinori, Argiano, Casanova di Neri, Col d'Orcia, Marchesi de' Frescobaldi (some of them were involved with the so called Brunellopoli and accused of using grapes other than Sangiovese in order to increase production and have higher returns).

Definitely try Capanna or Lambardi for a great price/quality ratio (we're around 30$ here).

Silvio Nardi, Bellaria, Fornacina, Soldera are a bit cheaper but still of very good taste.

On the medium-high step we have Mastrojanni, and Lisini for around 40$.

If you like wine and like spending on wine, you can't go wrong with Gaja. Also, either as an investment or a superlative bottle of wine -- or both, try Biondi Santi (Tenuta Greppo).



PS - for a lighter, fresher (cheaper) alternative, you can also try Rosso di Montalcino (DOC): same 100% Sangiovese grosso but only 6 months aging in a oak barrel and 1 total year before release.
post #130 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by wootx View Post

Thanks everyone for your input!

I can reciprocate with with some info about wine -- today: Brunello di Montalcino.

DOCG
Grapes: Sangiovese 100%
ABV: 12.5%

Brunello is produced in a very small region ~40 km south of Siena from Sangiovese grapes exclusively; actually, grapes growing in that region are different (bigger, fuller) from other Sangiovese grapes used to produce i.e. Chianti. It's one of the most expensive Italian wines and, together with Barolo, one of those with the greatest longevity.

After fermentation, the wine is first aged in oak barrels for at least 2 years, then again for at least 4 months in a bottle before selling is permitted no earlier than 5 years from the harvest vintage. Brunello Riserva ages at least 6 months in a bottle, and cannot be sold before 6 years from the harvest year.

I don't know abut availability, but some vineyards (that is, producers) have already started trading all over the world. Banfi is certainly active in the US, although they produce a wine quite dissimilar from actual Brunello (I believe they tried to make it more palatable/sweet/whatever). Also avoid Antinori, Argiano, Casanova di Neri, Col d'Orcia, Marchesi de' Frescobaldi (some of them were involved with the so called Brunellopoli and accused of using grapes other than Sangiovese in order to increase production and have higher returns).

Definitely try Capanna or Lambardi for a great price/quality ratio (we're around 30$ here).

Silvio Nardi, Bellaria, Fornacina, Soldera are a bit cheaper but still of very good taste.

On the medium-high step we have Mastrojanni, and Lisini for around 40$.

If you like wine and like spending on wine, you can't go wrong with Gaja. Also, either as an investment or a superlative bottle of wine -- or both, try Biondi Santi (Tenuta Greppo).



PS - for a lighter, fresher (cheaper) alternative, you can also try Rosso di Montalcino (DOC): same 100% Sangiovese grosso but only 6 months aging in a oak barrel and 1 total year before release.
Brunello doesn't have to be 12.5% - there are a huge different amounts available from $20- $100s of dollars available in the US. There is a large difference in vintages as well. The 2007 is drinking young. 2004, 2005, 2006 are all pretty good vintages that can be aged.

I wouldn't drink a brunello younger than 10 years old unless it was from 2007.

I currently have these brunello's in my 'cellar'

1x 2007 Pietranera Brunello di Montalcino (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
2x 2005 Tenimenti Ricci Brunello di Montalcino (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
1x 2006 Fattoria La Gerla Brunello di Montalcino (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
2x 2004 Domus Vitae Brunello di Montalcino Riserva (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
1x 2004 La Colombina Brunello di Montalcino Riserva (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
2x 2006 La Collina dei Lecci Brunello di Montalcino (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
1x 2006 Renieri Brunello di Montalcino (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
1x 2005 Le Casine Brunello di Montalcino (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
1x 2005 Vitanza Brunello di Montalcino Tradizione (Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino)
post #131 of 367

So, question.  If I buy a bottle of decent wine and just hang on to it, does it continue to age and get "better," or is it not really fermenting once it's out of the barrel?

 

I know jack shit about wine.

post #132 of 367
It will continue to get better if you keep it in the following conditions:
1) Out of light
2) Decent amount of humidity 50%+
3) Cooler temperatures lets say 55-65 degrees (that doesn't fluctuate much day to day)


Keep in mind not all wines get better with age. And they all have their time limits as well.

If you want to buy some newer age worth wines, they may require a few hours of decanting prior to drinking if you want to drink them young.
post #133 of 367

Neat, thanks. I have a weird thing for anything that gets "better" with age.  Certain clothes are a good example.

post #134 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingJulien View Post

So, question.  If I buy a bottle of decent wine and just hang on to it, does it continue to age and get "better," or is it not really fermenting once it's out of the barrel?

I know jack shit about wine.

depends on the wine, but most wines these days are meant to be drunk young within 1-5 years.
post #135 of 367
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingJulien View Post

Neat, thanks. I have a weird thing for anything that gets "better" with age.  Certain clothes are a good example.

I have a lady friend I'd like to introduce you to
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › ***The Not Even Slightly Official SW+D Booze and Cocktail Thread***