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Streamlined Shoe Wardrobe - Page 7

post #91 of 273
Quote:
The list:

1) Black stitch caps. For funerals, job interviews, Important Meetings, and whenever you must be the ne plus ultra of CBD
2) Brown punch caps. The ultimate suit shoe, gorgeous and goes with virtually everything; could sub this one for a brown half or full brogue
3) A thick-soled blucher or longwing in brown textured calf or burg shell. Think the foo shoe, ed's Dinelackers, JL Russell, or one of those Vass $hitkickers. Perfect for any fall/winter odd jacket and good with most fall/winter suits
4) Tan monks. Good for summer suits or odd jackets, wearable the rest of the year
5) #8 shell or mink suede loafers. Dark enough for a blazer, grays and a white shirt but also colorful enough for day; better than lace-ups for most no-tie outfits
6) Tobacco suede oxford: goes with all suits from Labor Day to Memorial Day; wear it with odd jackets as long as I don't see you

Pretty good list.

I second that the monks aren't necessary. Anything in tan/cognac works.

How about the Alden NST or the EG Dover in cognac? (Split toes)
Edited by jrd617 - 3/6/13 at 3:31pm
post #92 of 273

Some basic principles need to revamped and clarified:

-Oxfords [together with Balmorals and Wholecuts] can be worn with anything
-Black shoes can be worn with anything
-Brown is almost never better than black, the world's ugliest shoes are all some shade of brown
-Calf looks great in burg as does shell
- the right Loafers are the bomb with suits and look more elegant than most oxfords and balmorals. Only wholecuts challenge loafers for elegance with suits
-Bulky shoes look ridiculous with worsteds and other lightweight clothes as do dainty shoes with heavy clothes
-shoes lighter than suits never look better than shoes the same or darker tone than suit
-Shell and suede are for year round wear
-Tan shoes are for Italians and dilettantes. They will be the first ones you trade away or sell, so don't buy them to begin with.


Partial exceptions:

-Full brogues are best with tweed odd jackets, but work with business suits when the design and construction is more refined than a gunboat.
-Black shoes are best with a blazer and grays, especially when an oxford, balmoral, or wholecut. Burgundy is ok, but never brown which is just a murky red by any other name.
-Sleek, unlined dark suede loafers are great with tweed and everything else except a dinner suit.
-White and dirty bucks (i.e., suede) are for summer wear if you are an adolescent or dilettante.


The list:

1) Black shoes whenever you must be the ne plus ultra of elegance. Everyone should own at least one oxford, balmoral, or wholecut in black calf or shell. The right black loafer [not a moccasin] might be the most elegant shoe you own.
2) Do not buy Brown punch caps. They are the ultimate dilettante suit shoe, ugly and go with virtually nothing. Includes all shades of brown. Burgundy is a far better choice, but only dilettantes need buy. All others should buy another black dress shoe be it tassel loafer, wholecut, punchcap, or quarter brogue. Fact: brown is a shade of red. If you want to wear red shoes, then go RED, starting with burgundy or oxblood.
3) A double-soled blucher or oxford longwing in black, navy, burgundy, espresso smooth or textured calf, shell or suede. Perfect for any odd jacket and good with most non-business suits anytime of year. Chicks dig them. For wear with business suits, buy one with a single sole on an elegant last.
4) Never ever wear monks or tan shoes. Tan monks are the wost and a double fail. [for a better fourth choice; see item 7.) below]
5) #8 shell or mink suede or black calf loafers. Perfect for a blazer, grays and a white shirt. Colorful enough for day wear while making the jump into evening wear far better than anything lighter in color. Better than lace-ups for most no-tie outfits. [agreed] If you want one loafer, make it black calf or mink/espresso suede and be happy.
6) Tobacco suede or calf oxford: goes with casual non-business suits or odd jackets anytime when the sun is up, but leave them at home after the sun goes down. If you like loafers, tobacco suede is a good fit here.

 

7.) The ultimate shoe for comfort is the crepe soled desert boot/chukka. Espresso or bitter chocolate is the go to color. Wear anytime day or night and in any season with anything except dinner suit or most formal business suits.

post #93 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by recondite View Post

The list:

1) Black shoes whenever you must be the ne plus ultra of elegance. Everyone should own at least one oxford, balmoral, or wholecut in black calf or shell. The right black loafer [not a moccasin] might be the most elegant shoe you own.

2) Do not buy Brown punch caps. They are the ultimate dilettante suit shoe, ugly and go with virtually nothing. Includes all shades of brown. Burgundy is a far better choice, but only dilettantes need buy. All others should buy another black dress shoe be it tassel loafer, wholecut, punchcap, or quarter brogue. Fact: brown is a shade of red. If you want to wear red shoes, then go RED, starting with burgundy or oxblood.

Do you realize that the "dilettante" OP you are responding to wrote a book on classic menswear? biggrin.gif

Also, it seems that your fondness for black shoes is informed the opinions you received from a small sample of females. Hate to break it to you, but they're wrong.

Black is a severe color best used for ultra conservative business dress and for weddings/funerals/formal events. Think worsted suits and tuxedos
post #94 of 273
^ this just became the new dumbest post I ever read on SF, and that's really saying something

EDIT: jrd's post was good, obviously I was referring to the previous post
post #95 of 273

^^

 

What of tan trousers or tweed jackets? I dunno if I'd do black shoes with either of those, and that's most of what I'm wearing when I'm in coat and tie. Would you, recondite, or would you use burgundy there (which is what I do now).

post #96 of 273
Almost picked up these black Alden loafers for $255

Then I realized I'd have virtually nothing to wear them with. Brown and burgundy loafers, even cognac, are much better choices

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=221191007810
post #97 of 273
If this guy is wearing black oxfords with tan trousers or khakis (or basically any other color that isn't black, charcoal, dark grey, of navy) then he will already be in the running for worst dressed guy in the room. Saying oxfords can be worn with anything and black shoes can be worn with anything is simply wrong in every sense of the word.
post #98 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beatlegeuse View Post

^ this just became the new dumbest post I ever read on SF, and that's really saying something

EDIT: jrd's post was good, obviously I was referring to the previous post

Recondite tends to do that. He derailed the good taste thread for a couple of days.

 

I really hope there isn't some new SF member out there listening to anything he says.

post #99 of 273
Recondite tried to seriously suggest in the Good Taste thread that a blazer, shorts, and black captoe oxfords (with OTC socks, IIRC) were in good taste. I'd take everything he says with a metric ton of salt.

There are some nuggets buried in there every now and then, but most of it can be ignored.
post #100 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by YRR92 View Post

^^

 

What of tan trousers or tweed jackets? I dunno if I'd do black shoes with either of those, and that's most of what I'm wearing when I'm in coat and tie. Would you, recondite, or would you use burgundy there (which is what I do now).

 

Burgundy is an excellent choice with the above for daywear. Brown is a shade of red, albeit a murky one So, if you are going to wear red shoes; burgundy, oxblood, no. 8 cordovan, tobacco, or some other more obvious red tone is nearly always a better choice than some less remarkable shade of brown where red is less prominent.

 

Black and tan [or khaki] is a classic color combination. It is very high contrast, but it works every time they are combined. Khaki or tan suit and black shoes can be a stunning outfit for all the right reasons, where brown shoes would simply be boring.

 

Seriously, say you are wearing a black cashmere v-neck or cardigan sweater with your tan or khaki trousers and any decent shirt; what color shoes would look better than black? Likewise if your tweed jacket has some black undertones or grey overtones, black leather goods would be your best choice.

 

Never underestimate the power of black shoes and belt to create contrast in an outfit where it is needed or desired. If you have an outfit that is largely brown, like a tweed suit or jacket, brown shoes would be the wrong choice if they do not create proper contrast with the balance of the outfit. Black is the color trump card when you need contrast to make an outfit remarkable instead of boring.

 

Lack of contrast in an outfit creates a monotone fail, most would call "too matchy".

 

This is why for something like an afternoon wedding or reception, cordovan or burgundy shoes can actually work better with an otherwise very conservative navy or charcoal lounge suit, than they might with a brown tweed jacket and burgundy flannel trousers. The shoes would provide some level of contrast with the suits that would work well in daylight, but be less successful at night or with the above sport coat and trousers with which they are too close to in both tone and/or color.

post #101 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by recondite View Post
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Burgundy is an excellent choice with the above for daywear. Brown is a shade of red, albeit a murky one So, if you are going to wear red shoes; burgundy, oxblood, no. 8 cordovan, tobacco, or some other more obvious red tone is nearly always a better choice than some less remarkable shade of brown where red is less prominent.

 

Black and tan [or khaki] is a classic color combination. It is very high contrast, but it works every time they are combined. Khaki or tan suit and black shoes can be a stunning outfit for all the right reasons, where brown shoes would simply be boring.

 

 

 

Seriously, say you are wearing a black cashmere v-neck or cardigan sweater with your tan or khaki trousers and any decent shirt; what color shoes would look better than black? Likewise if your tweed jacket has some black undertones or grey overtones, black leather goods would be your best choice.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Never underestimate the power of black shoes and belt to create contrast in an outfit where it is needed or desired. If you have an outfit that is largely brown, like a tweed suit or jacket, brown shoes would be the wrong choice if they do not create proper contrast with the balance of the outfit. Black is the color trump card when you need contrast to make an outfit remarkable instead of boring.

 

Lack of contrast in an outfit creates a monotone fail, most would call "too matchy".

 

This is why for something like an afternoon wedding or reception, cordovan or burgundy shoes can actually work better with an otherwise very conservative navy or charcoal lounge suit, than they might with a brown tweed jacket and burgundy flannel trousers. The shoes would provide some level of contrast with the suits that would work well in daylight, but be less successful at night or with the above sport coat and trousers with which they are too close to in both tone and/or color.

 

 

 

Black + Khaki. 

1000

post #102 of 273
I don't agree with everything recondite writes, but I like that he brings an informed and well-reasoned point of view, and I think the forum -- any forum -- benefits greatly from having guys like him come in and rock the boat, snapping people out of their mental torpor. In this case, he's right on the money in questioning the antipathy so many internet dwellers seem to nurse toward black shoes. It's silly, and many of them dress much the worse for it.
post #103 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by recondite View Post

 

Burgundy is an excellent choice with the above for daywear. Brown is a shade of red, albeit a murky one So, if you are going to wear red shoes; burgundy, oxblood, no. 8 cordovan, tobacco, or some other more obvious red tone is nearly always a better choice than some less remarkable shade of brown where red is less prominent.

 

Black and tan [or khaki] is a classic color combination. It is very high contrast, but it works every time they are combined. Khaki or tan suit and black shoes can be a stunning outfit for all the right reasons, where brown shoes would simply be boring.

 

Seriously, say you are wearing a black cashmere v-neck or cardigan sweater with your tan or khaki trousers and any decent shirt; what color shoes would look better than black? Likewise if your tweed jacket has some black undertones or grey overtones, black leather goods would be your best choice.

 

Never underestimate the power of black shoes and belt to create contrast in an outfit where it is needed or desired. If you have an outfit that is largely brown, like a tweed suit or jacket, brown shoes would be the wrong choice if they do not create proper contrast with the balance of the outfit. Black is the color trump card when you need contrast to make an outfit remarkable instead of boring.

 

Lack of contrast in an outfit creates a monotone fail, most would call "too matchy".

 

This is why for something like an afternoon wedding or reception, cordovan or burgundy shoes can actually work better with an otherwise very conservative navy or charcoal lounge suit, than they might with a brown tweed jacket and burgundy flannel trousers. The shoes would provide some level of contrast with the suits that would work well in daylight, but be less successful at night or with the above sport coat and trousers with which they are too close to in both tone and/or color.

Recondite, you're like the opposite of SF groupthink. I don't know if that's a good or bad thing.

 

Tan trousers with black shoes = WW2 uniform, for me. I don't have to worry very much about black sweaters because I don't like how I look in black. That said, I've taken to wearing black shoes whenever I don't have a reason not to (very rarely, admittedly).

 

Even with a gray-ish tweed jacket, I prefer burg shoes. I haven't got plain brown shoes I'd wear with tweed, at the moment, but it probably wouldn't drive me crazy to do so.

post #104 of 273

The shoe I want to wear more than any other is this one:

 

 

 

Always with odd jacket/trousers. They're darker than in the photo.

post #105 of 273
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post


Do you realize that the "dilettante" OP you are responding to wrote a book on classic menswear? biggrin.gif

Also, it seems that your fondness for black shoes is informed the opinions you received from a small sample of females. Hate to break it to you, but they're wrong.

Black is a severe color best used for ultra conservative business dress and for weddings/funerals/formal events. Think worsted suits and tuxedos

 

LOL!

 

You reading comprehension is poor. None of the shoes I purchased to attract paramours is black. Espresso suede, navy suede, midnight calf, but not black.

 

Just because one is an author, published or not, do not make one an authority.

 

My experience is unique, which is why I detailed it. It was my experience. You cannot deny my experience although you may choose to revile it.

 

Anyone, such as the author in question, that would recommend the purchase of a non-standard shoe such as a tan monk strap shoe of any configuration is by definition a dilettante.

 

If I recommended universal application of a black calf tassel loafers, you would be right to label me a dilettante.

 

This is true for all self proclaimed experts that would recommend any such non-standard affectations such as; claiming that every fly fisherman needs a hexagina imitation in his flybox, that best solution for wingshooting is a 28 gauge loaded with 3/4 an ounce of number seven tungsten shot, that one could never do better than to take all African game with a 6.5x54 Mannlicher-Schönauer, that the best motorcycle ever created is a 1967 Triumph Bonneville, or other such non-sense.

 

Anyone making non-standard recommendations is by definition; a dilettante.

 

I didn't recommend black tassel loafers to everyone. I explained why they worked for me.

 

1. Elegant

2. Useful/functional

 

I also explained the other choices I later made, unlike our resident dilettante that would recommend tan monks and brown captoes as universal solutions to the problem of footwear, despite the fact that they are nearly universally UNACCEPTABLE in polite company or observed in the wild. And when they are observed in the wild, it is when they are displayed by one dilettante seeking the approval of other dilettantes, as opposed to the approval of the balance of their audience who willingly remain ignorant as to the real and imagined virtues of brown captoes and tan monkstraps.

 

In fact, someone that would even consider wearing monkstraps is nearly always; "THAT GUY". You know, THAT GUY, that would tell all who might listen about why blue shirts are the bomb, why patch pockets are superior to besom pockets on odd jackets despite their lack of elegance, or why black shoes should never be worn with navy; LOL. He is the guy standing alone by the crudités trying to find a drop of ranch dressing in which to dip his carrot stick, at the end of a long evening entertaining himself while surrounded by a houseful of most interesting people.

 

No doubt took the time to flog his book once or twice before his audience evaporated to seek out more fulfilling activities.

 

FYI; my fondness for black shoes is limited to the understanding of which shoes look best with the balance of my wardrobe. That is my aesthetic and not the one you propose.

 

Cheers!

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