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On Swelled Edges: When Are They Best Used? - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexSF View Post

^Great post as usual!

I have a question about pickstitching,

In the lapel do you usually use a real backstitch or a running stitch like the one used for pocket flaps?

Thanks

When working by hand, I guess it's possible that some people may use a running stitch on some parts (the AMF etc. stitch is a running stitch), I was taught that it is a back stitch everywhere.
post #17 of 29
I doubt it is ever a running stitch if sewn by hand. There are these relatively long stitches on the underside that can snag on things. With a backstitch, any damage to the stitch remains local. With a running stitch, you'd have to re-do the entire pick stitching.

I guess with swelled edges it is necessary to maintain the full thickness of the seam allowances. It is customary to "stage"/"step" the seam allowances to make for thin edges. This requirement is a big danger, because coatmakers oftentimes work reflexively/on autopilot and would step the seam allowances only to recall later that the coat is meant to have swelled edges.
post #18 of 29
^Thanks for your answers

Backstitch is also easier to do and more precise, my doubt born because I rarely seen the classic overlapping in the underside of backstitch in lapels and flaps.

also pictures found on Jefferyd blog confirm this, for example here:

6864945869_fc4a9a41cf.jpg

4257178107_d6ca506e00_b.jpg

Or maybe I am making confusion with terms, how do you call the stitch above?

Thanks
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by hymo View Post


I guess with swelled edges it is necessary to maintain the full thickness of the seam allowances. It is customary to "stage"/"step" the seam allowances to make for thin edges. This requirement is a big danger, because coatmakers oftentimes work reflexively/on autopilot and would step the seam allowances only to recall later that the coat is meant to have swelled edges.

Not necessarily- you would still have the effect.
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexSF View Post

^Thanks for your answers

Backstitch is also easier to do and more precise, my doubt born because I rarely seen the classic overlapping in the underside of backstitch in lapels and flaps.

That is probably a backstitch- you only get the overlap on fine cloth. Also depends on the angle of insertion of the needle. But now we're getting a bit too esoteric, I think.
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
That was all very, very helpful, Jeffery. Big thanks for taking the time to do that.
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

But now we're getting a bit too esoteric, I think.

I agree biggrin.gif Sorry to have bothered you, thanks for your answer.

I am only a self-taught who like to alter his own clothes,
I shortened sleeves in a jacket some days ago and I had to redo all the impuntura and I used the running stitch, so the reason of my curiosity.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


( I should improve the lining sewing, I know)

But now I stop, the thread is for another purpose, many thanks.
Edited by alexSF - 3/6/13 at 12:13pm
post #23 of 29
Basically, always get this on anything casual. And anyhting with patch pockets. But I repeat myself.
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Basically, always get this on anything casual. And anyhting with patch pockets. But I repeat myself.

Even on a gun club faux tweed? I felt like swelled edges would be too much for such a visually buys pattern, no?

FWIW, the gun club faux tweed will have patch pockets, and be of Italian make.

I will say, in the examples shown on my original post, I think the second set of photos - the one with bluff edges - would all do better with swelled edges or double stitching. (swell on the rougher fabrics; double stitching on the thinner, smoother ones).
post #25 of 29
I always do.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

There seems to be some confusion about what swelled edges are and are not. So here we go.
 

Very clear and helpful esplainin.  Just what I was looking for.

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

Done this way, the swelled edge is seen as a somewhat decorative detail to give character to sportier garments. The style in southern Italy is somewhat more exuberant

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexSF View Post

I agree biggrin.gif Sorry to have bothered you, thanks for your answer.

I am only a self-taught who like to alter his own clothes,
I shortened sleeves in a jacket some days ago and I had to redo all the impuntura and I used the running stitch, so the reason of my curiosity.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


( I should improve the lining sewing, I know)

But now I stop, the thread is for another purpose, many thanks.

The impuntura on your coat was a running stitch because it was almost certainly done with a Complett machine. And though the flaps posted above look like they might be a running stitch, they were actually back stitched.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

The impuntura on your coat was a running stitch because it was almost certainly done with a Complett machine. And though the flaps posted above look like they might be a running stitch, they were actually back stitched.

Yes the original impuntura was surely done with complett machine, I replicated it in the same place using the original little marks (left by the washing process used for the garment finishing)

However I just tried to do a backstitch there and you are totally (and obviously) right, the backstitch in a similar layers of fabric doesn't show the typical overlapping.
I fell in error having used it only for thin fabrics, so I could have been used the proper backstitch and not the wrong running stitch.
Another thing learned!

Many thanks for you kind help.
Edited by alexSF - 3/6/13 at 3:21pm
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