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The Last "Stroller" thread I'll Ever Need - Page 3

post #31 of 54
You're quite right -- in some ways.
post #32 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

Really? Is this what people are being taught where you are? That's kinda funny!

Yes... it's really in the poor schools, using older textbooks from The People's Education Press of Beijing. There's another series of English reading books that they use and it really suprised me. Peter & Jane books by Ladybird Books of Loughborough, UK. Which are copyright and revised 1968. I learned to read with these things, and I'm 50 on Wednesday, that's why I was so surprised to see them here. These books are based around a lower-middle class English family, probably near London. Father is likely a London stockbroker or something, mum stays at home, large detached house, they own ponies, etc. I'm sure it surprises many to find that English people are not like that. I wear exactly the same clothes the local population, including Chinese and Mongolian styles. My only consession to truly English looking attire is a blue double breasted blazer with metal buttons I wear sometimes, and that can turn heads. smile.gif Although I had it made up in Hong Kong, it didn't come from the UK.
post #33 of 54
Thread Starter 

Here is a follow up question for you based on what you said above. Do you find that it is completely acceptable for you to wear local traditional clothing where you are? The reason I ask is because I have lived in the Middle East in various places for more than 3 years. In many places it would be considered highly unusual for a white person to wear traditional middle eastern style clothing. Some might even be offended. In other places here it would not be considered offensive and it would probably even be encouraged.

post #34 of 54
I actually find stroller a very useful uniform especially in HK, because most people here never seen nor understand the history of morning formal outfits. I recall once my pupil master was asking me whether my black trouser was with the dry cleaner when I worn the multi-stripe trousers. It actually bends in very well when the working environment is a sea of black suits.

Also, you don't have headache to match a stroller outfit before going to work in the morning.
post #35 of 54

Even 20 years ago it would not have been uncommon for senior members of the Bar, the judiciary, etc. to wear 'strollers'.  Even in the early 2000s, I remember one senior civil servant (who worked in a quasi-judicial function) who remained so attired.  It would be costume now. 

 

I have some sympathy for the attractions of finding a quasi-uniform for business dress, so I can see the attraction of the stroller in the past.  Presumably the modern answer is the BlazerSuit(TM), obviously with non-metal buttons.
 


Edited by Balfour - 3/2/13 at 9:06am
post #36 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

Here is a follow up question for you based on what you said above. Do you find that it is completely acceptable for you to wear local traditional clothing where you are? The reason I ask is because I have lived in the Middle East in various places for more than 3 years. In many places it would be considered highly unusual for a white person to wear traditional middle eastern style clothing. Some might even be offended. In other places here it would not be considered offensive and it would probably even be encouraged.

My guess, rightly or wrongly, is that in the Middle-east, the garb is often laden with political and religious symbolism -- the hijab, keffiyeh (Palestinian resistance movements), and the taqiyah are good examples. Thus, to pretend to be part of a politically and religiously-charged culture where religion is sacrosanct and politics divisive might be distasteful to some. It's like you go to church and if you're not Christian you're told to abstain from Communion (albeit for different reasons).

But I'd guess that in China, local cultural dress is probably devoid of such divisive forces, so it might be perfectly okay (though a little funny) to see somebody not from that culture adopt a cultural dress.

Bear in mind that I'm just taking a stab at what might be the reason for why it might be offensive for anybody who does not belong to don these garments that are worn for religious purposes in the Mid-East.

But, basically, my hypothesis is that it's all in the reasons for why the garment is worn and what these garments symbolize (if anything at all).
post #37 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balfour View Post

Even 20 years ago it would not have been uncommon for senior members of the Bar, the judiciary, etc. to wear 'strollers'.  Even in the early 2000s, I remember one senior civil servant (who worked in a quasi-judicial function) who remained so attired.  It would be costume now.  I have some sympathy for the attractions of finding a quasi-uniform for business dress, so I can see the attraction of the stroller in the past.  Presumably the modern answer is the BlazerSuit(TM), obviously with non-metal buttons.

 

Can you elaborate more on the blazersuit concept you've put out? You're saying that's the modern answer to the stroller in London?
post #38 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post


My guess, rightly or wrongly, is that in the Middle-east, the garb is often laden with political and religious symbolism -- the hijab, keffiyeh (Palestinian resistance movements), and the taqiyah are good examples. Thus, to pretend to be part of a politically and religiously-charged culture where religion is sacrosanct and politics divisive might be distasteful to some. It's like you go to church and if you're not Christian you're told to abstain from Communion (albeit for different reasons).

But I'd guess that in China, local cultural dress is probably devoid of such divisive forces, so it might be perfectly okay (though a little funny) to see somebody not from that culture adopt a cultural dress.

Bear in mind that I'm just taking a stab at what might be the reason for why it might be offensive for anybody who does not belong to don these garments that are worn for religious purposes in the Mid-East.

 

It makes sense. I have just always found it interesting that, for instance, an Asian man wearing a suit would not be unusual, but a Caucasian man wearing a kimono would be.

post #39 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

Here is a follow up question for you based on what you said above. Do you find that it is completely acceptable for you to wear local traditional clothing where you are? The reason I ask is because I have lived in the Middle East in various places for more than 3 years. In many places it would be considered highly unusual for a white person to wear traditional middle eastern style clothing. Some might even be offended. In other places here it would not be considered offensive and it would probably even be encouraged.

No problems at all actually. I think because in the Middle East much traditional
clothing has deeply religous meanings. And if you're an "infidal", it might not
go down so well. wink.gif

Here it seems to be more about the culture, the lifestyle and history of the
Mongolian people, right back to Ghenghis Khan.

I do have limits though, I wouldn't wear anything like this...

...because I would feel rather self conscious in it. But the local Mongolian population wouldn't have a problem with it at all AFAICT. They're very friendly people I've found. As are the local Han Chinese population.

But on the other hand I wear this a lot. Got a few jackets around this kind of style as well...

It has a Mongolian cut, trim and fastening, but it's denim, complete with school chalk (ooops!! we're in Classic Menswear, not SW&D biggrin.gif ). It's made locally here in Xilinhot. I'd wear that in the UK as well.


Although the chances are many of the local people are going to be wearing something more along these lines....

happy.gif
Edited by MikeDT - 3/2/13 at 9:11am
post #40 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post


 

That's actually kind of cool in a "you'd have to have a connection to it to pull it off" kind of way. And you certainly have more of a connection than I do when it comes to Asian dress.

post #41 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post


Can you elaborate more on the blazersuit concept you've put out? You're saying that's the modern answer to the stroller in London?


Not the modern answer to a stroller.  An attractive idea as the modern answer for a CBD quasi-uniform.

 

See: 

 

http://www.styleforum.net/t/71198/the-amazing-blazer-suit/0_50

http://www.styleforum.net/t/104793/the-blazersuit-part-deux

http://www.styleforum.net/t/119664/blazersuit-the-final-chapter/0_50

 

Not common in London.  As you know, the typical garb of London white collar middle management when told to dress down is the GIF Sw/oT: Ghastly Ill-Fitting Suit worn without Tie.

 

Lazy.  When I feel I need to dress down, or simply have a quiet day working in my room, I quite often reach for blue odd jacket and grey flannels - suitable City colours, compatible with black shoes, unobtrusive but more comme il faut than the GIF Sw/oT.

 

EDIT:  I should say that the 'CBD quasi-uniform' is an editorial gloss of my own; Manton developed it for its versatility.


Edited by Balfour - 3/2/13 at 11:48pm
post #42 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

Hey, why do you think the entire population of N. Korea hasn't risen up in arms in protest against their appalling conditions? These people are socialised into thinking a certain way, and viewing the world through certain lenses.

This is not to say that the guy resides in a country like that. But Orwell famously said 'he who controls the past controls the future'.


Things can get interesting occasionally, the only time Xilinhot made world news AFAIK.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13592514

"China's Inner Mongolia 'under heavy security'"
I know all of them dressed in yellow tracksuits, it's the uniform of Xilinhot Mongolian Middle School.

I had a phone call that morning, "Michael, don't bother coming into school today."

Next day, it was all quiet, and business as usual.
post #43 of 54
Not history at all! bigstar[1].gif



post #44 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butler View Post

Not history at all! bigstar[1].gif




Mr. Bulter you just need to understand your are a cool bad-ass, with you graceful age no one is going to challenge what you wear or do. Not many people on the forum can pull it off as well as you have.
post #45 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

This is just the info I was looking for. Thanks guys. It would seem that my old black jacket is not quite ready to make a comeback. I like the idea of peak lapels and jetted pockets, but unless it is forbidden I think I will shy away from no vents. I don't want it to look like a tuxedo jacket (unless someone can convince me otherwise), even though I know it is supposed to be formal wear.

 

Except for coat and hat, every detail of a stroller "suit," if I may use the term outside the context of pieces made from matching cloth, is the same as full dress, that is to say morning coat, or morning dress.  The only difference is that the jacket has no tails.  Like a morning coat, charcoal and black are acceptable.  Black is the most formal option.  Peak lapels are a must, as are besom pockets.  The jacket must be single breasted.  A one-button closure is most correct, while a two-button closure is also correct, but less so.  The waistcoat is the same, and has the same room for variation.  The trousers are the same.  These resources should be helpful:

 

http://www.morningdressguide.com

http://www.blacktieguide.com/Supplemental/Morning_Dress.htm

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