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Do you care how your coworkers dress? Does the decline of formality of dress bother you? - Page 4

post #46 of 130
My peers dress well and I require my staff to dress nicely. I don't care about how anyone else dresses.
post #47 of 130

No, my co-workers' clothes don't bother me at all. In real life, unless it's an attractive woman, I barely even notice what other people are wearing. Dozens of things cross my mind before clothes and judging people based on clothes,  but I'm sure that some members here feel differently.

post #48 of 130

wow, this thread incited 48 posts in 5 hours! 

 

Being a salesman myself, I've learned to never judge a person by the clothes they wear, not even my colleagues. In the past 20 years, North America really celebrated normalcy and casualness from dumbing down language to casual everydays and I recognise that certain people value things differently and clothing may be the bottom of the list for some. As my mother says, being current and clean is the most important. 

 

With the current trend for colour socks in recent years, I've noticed guys in my office wearing black-base with big colour pokka dot socks whilst wearing suit and tie and that irks as I see it's too childish. (may be they may think it's stylish, what were they thinking?!?) However their style choice doesn't affect my judgement and relationship with them. It's his priority and taste.

post #49 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by allysan1027 View Post

I think the idea that a formal dress code would benefit a company is the mentality that only a fashion forum would have, or maybe someone who has watched Suits too many times.

Except at some very high end financial services/law firms, I would assume that most people would not want a formal dress code, nor would they think that somehow it would be beneficial to the company.

Khakis, polos, dress shirts, etc. can be had for cheap. Entry level big 4 accountants (my industry) here in NYC struggle to pay rent and food on their salaries (which are at least average to above average for an entry level position), imagine telling them they had to buy suits, ties, etc.?

Most people who don't frequent SF would rather wear jeans and a t-shirt to work than a suit. That's why casual fridays were instituted right? Making people do something they don't want to (and something that's detrimental to their budget) will not result in a better work environment.

Nowhere did I say that employees would vote for a more formal dress code or love the idea. I did not even say that some environments would certainly benefit from a more formal dress code. I simply said that it may make more sense in some environments, particularly more conservative ones, than others, and that I could see how it could be beneficial in a more conservative culture. You seem to concede this point partially with respect to law firms. The idea that more formal dress could have benefits in the workplace is not a mentality that is limited to those on a style or fashion forum. That's just an absurd generalization.

Ties are not going to break the bank and most people do not wear their jackets during the day anyways, so they could get away with slacks, dress shirt and tie. Buying a suit to have in the office in case you have a client meeting and another suit at home isn't going to break the bank for accountants either. Neither is wearing nicer dress pants instead of chinos. I had to wear a suit everyday my first job out of undergrad and I made it work.

Some may prefer jeans and a t-shirt in the office, but there are a lot of potential explanations for this that don't suggest a more formal environment would be a bad thing. Frankly, at some point growing up means not wearing the same things you wore when you were 16. Casual attire has its place, but the office is not the same as your house or your local dive bar.
post #50 of 130

I've always tried to dress as well as possible in work environments, either casual or suit and tie. But not to show anyone up. I've always believed that you dress for the job you want not the one you have.  So, I don't get upset if someone else chooses to pay little attention to their outfits.  I think the real issue is some people's response to a sartorial sensibility. I've had some people make their little comments, but that does not stop me from being me. So own your style and your co-workers may step up theirs. If not don't sweat it, own it.

post #51 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

As I think about this, it's possible that different work environments benefit from different dress codes.

I'm admittedly making some big generalizations, but I do think that a formal dress code would be more beneficial in some professions than others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

I did not even say that some environments would certainly benefit from a more formal dress code.

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post #52 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by addedfuel View Post

Being a salesman myself, I've learned to never judge a person by the clothes they wear, not even my colleagues.

Agree on not judging an individual by their clothes completely. I think some people here may do that, but I don't think it is the main point of the thread.
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinnyMac View Post

No, my co-workers' clothes don't bother me at all. In real life, unless it's an attractive woman, I barely even notice what other people are wearing. Dozens of things cross my mind before clothes and judging people based on clothes,  but I'm sure that some members here feel differently.

I don't think that preferring a more elegant work environment or liking to see people dress up to go to nice restaurants equates to judging people based on their clothes. I know some great people who are terrible dressers and/or live in jeans and a t-shirt for their entire life and stylish formal dressers who area real jerks.

Many of my good friends wear jeans to church. I don't think less of them for it, but when I look out and see a majority of people wearing jeans to something that once called for one's "Sunday best," I do wonder about our culture.
post #53 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by allysan1027 View Post


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Please note use of the word "possible" in the first sentence you quote, the fact that the second sentence is clearly trying to make a relative statement across industries rather than an absolute statement about any particular industry and that the final sentence you quote refers to a certain absolute benefit in a particular industry.
post #54 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by bant View Post

we are human after all. we are perceptive and we draw conclusions. one's appearance and dress is either a reflection of how they wish to be viewed or (for the less self aware) a voyeuristic glimpse into how they view themselves and their role. truly poor, inappropriate dress either broadcasts "i don't care what you think about me" or worse, "i lack even the most basic level of self-awareness to understand that you will draw conclusions based on how i look"" and either is representative of negative personality traits in a professional environment where teamwork, self-motivation, relationship building etc. are valued.

Second this. Only I would add that "inappropriate dress" is highly contextual, so what goes in Muskogee, Oklahoma, probably won't play equally well in some metropolis, and vice versa. And that's how it should be.
post #55 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

Please note use of the word "possible" in the first sentence you quote, the fact that the second sentence is clearly trying to make a relative statement across industries rather than an absolute statement about any particular industry and that the final sentence you quote refers to a certain absolute benefit in a particular industry.

Ironically, Allysan1027's writing would benefit from some suit-induced rigor.
post #56 of 130
For the most part, my coworkers dress reasonably well.
I am in DC & work very close to the SEC, Judiciary etc.
I often feel embarassed for the way some of these folks dress and fundamenatally maintain their appearance.

Perhaps it is an Antipodean trait, that was drilled in from an early age.
- Fingernails
- Oral Hygiene
- Shoes (maintain them well, regardless of whether they are Lobss or Kenneth Cole)
post #57 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

H&M $100 suit.

Or Jos A. Bank, buy one suit get 4 for free.
post #58 of 130
Look, generally speaking, I don't care what anyone else wears, to work or otherwise. But, I do lament the casualisation of dress overall. It is rather tedious to have people, if I'm wearing a SC or suit, constantly pointing out what I'm wearing and asking if I'm interviewing or if there's something wrong with me. Very off putting to say the least. If more people wore suits these days, those sorts of reactions wouldn't exist (or would be far fewer in number).
post #59 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Doesn't this mean more competition? devil.gif

haha, competition is good, it drives me
post #60 of 130

Being in my first office environment position, I've had to start building my business wardrobe from the ground up, taking cues from here, which has definitely helped my awareness of these kind of things.

 

One thing I've noticed in my office s that suits are only worn by our managers, typically only when they have meetings. Otherwise, we are not required to put on anything else beyond a shirt and tie, which is in reality a little bit o fa bummer for me. No tie is required on Fridays, unless some sort of meeting goes on, which is generally unlikely. However, this did not stop me from buying my first two well-fitting staple suits just to have in the closet in case they're needed. It was quite odd indeed when I wore one of them that it drew the attention of my co-workers, perhaps because I'm by no means all that important in the organizational structure of the firm. This kind of echoes the response that people are slowly developing to more formal businesswear, which does not bother me by any means but I would much prefer to be in an environment where wearing a suit isn't only expected for the firm's top.

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