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Do you think it is bad form for a tailoring house to publish details of its "celebrity" client list? - Page 2

post #16 of 74
I always felt that you should be going to a tailor because of the product he produces and to hell with whoever else he dresses. I really don't care if he made so and so look good, the real question should be can he/she make ME look good.
post #17 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

I suspect that part of the origin point of my feelings is that I work in a profession where you just don't do this - confidentiality is central to our work - so that influences my thinking when it comes to other jobs, even if the same needs/strictures don't officially apply.

I wonder if there is a Tailor's "Ethics Code" floating around...

I had gone to a tailor that had pictures of his clients pictured on his wall. I assume the consumers gave permission else they would not have posed for the pics. Yes, the name-dropping does seem forced but I think the competitiveness of the trade, especially here in NYC, people try to get an edge in whatever way they can.
post #18 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by DpprDr View Post

I wonder if there is a Tailor's "Ethics Code" floating around...

I had gone to a tailor that had pictures of his clients pictured on his wall. I assume the consumers gave permission else they would not have posed for the pics. Yes, the name-dropping does seem forced but I think the competitiveness of the trade, especially here in NYC, people try to get an edge in whatever way they can.

Sure that would depend on the country. UK, USA or Canada probably yes. Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Bangkok, etc, most likely not.
post #19 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

Actually looking at this local NYC tailor chipp pushes JFK.
JFK is dead. Mentioning dead clients was always ok.
In general, it is better for tailors to keep quiet about their clients, both out of respect for the client (few will say no if you ask, but that doesn't mean they want to be asked), and also because it seems like hucksterism. I don't think you really are marketing to celebrity chasers.
post #20 of 74
There are public figures and there are celebrities. Either way, the way I see it is, if the 'client' is enjoying free merchandise in exchange for their endorsements, then fair game and this would have been pre-arranged between the two concerned parties. A perfect example of this type of arrangement is the annual Academy Awards and other film festivals where celebrities flaunt their free or loaned wares and happily plug whomever. There are restuarants and other public places with autographed photos of such people on their walls. If the client is actually paying for the product or service, then permission should be asked by the proprietor prior to the closure of the business transaction(s). It is morally and ethically wrong for any proprietor to invite themselves to outrightly invade or comprimise any paying clients privacy. What the law says about it, I will leave to the attorneys here to answer.
Edited by MyOtherLife - 3/2/13 at 10:45pm
post #21 of 74
There is no way in which you should disclose the names of your clients without their written agreement in advance. The likes of Sam in HK GIVE the garments to the celebrity and publicity is the other half of the deal. Unless that is the case, no.
Edited by GBR - 3/3/13 at 4:40am
post #22 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

JFK is dead. Mentioning dead clients was always ok.
In general, it is better for tailors to keep quiet about their clients, both out of respect for the client (few will say no if you ask, but that doesn't mean they want to be asked), and also because it seems like hucksterism. I don't think you really are marketing to celebrity chasers.

Come on though, a million people on here would would love it if someone was still around that made a suit for the duke of Windsor. Maybe celebrity is not the word, perhaps renowned, celebrated or something like that?
post #23 of 74
Ask the person behind the name before mentioning it in public.
post #24 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Man Of Lint View Post

There are public figures and there are celebrities. Either way, the way I see it is, if the 'client' is enjoying free merchandise in exchange for their endorsements, then fair game and this would have been pre-arranged between the two concerned parties. A perfect example of this type of arrangement is the annual Academy Awards and other film festivals where celebrities flaunt their free or loaned wares and happily plug whomever. There are restuarants and other public places with autographed photos of such people on their walls. If the client is actually paying for the product or service, then permission should be asked by the proprietor prior to the closure of the business transaction(s). It is morally and ethically wrong for any proprietor to invite themselves to outrightly invade or comprimise any paying clients privacy. What the law says about it, I will leave to the attorneys here to answer.

I used to get autographed photos sent to and signed to "Dave's mum". She's got a good little collection now. What's really funny is she thinks these people are close personal friends instead of clients, so I call up and she says stuff like "I saw your friend on TV last night Dave (but completely serious)". Who Mum? And it's someone hosting the royal variety performance or something.
Edited by David Reeves - 3/3/13 at 5:24am
post #25 of 74
On a more local level I've often had SA's and store owners speak of local politicians, sports celebrities, and even people who work in my organization who patronize their establishments. However, I'm not impressed by someone's client list, particularly if it includes people I know personally. Yet, I've even had tailors phone or send me e-mail soliciting business and proudly dropping the names of guys I work with who buy from them. I don't buy from local businesses that push the names of people I know, because if they drop the names of others, then they'll also drop my name. I value discretion.
post #26 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

If the client is happy for their name to be used in conjunction with your brand, all well & good.

It's a question of money.

If you give the goodies for free, most 'celebrities' are happy to have their name used.
post #27 of 74
Regarding Chipp/Winston Tailors:

Paul Winston would never mention JFK as a way to get a client. He has been in the business for 50 years and has plenty of funny stories about the clientele. If you want JFK's suit, then by all means ask to have one made from his pattern. If you want a suit made from Frank Sinatra's pattern, go to Alfred Dunhill. Anyone who goes to a tailor just because a living or dead celebrity shopped/endorsed/was paid by is either an idiot or has no sense of his own style. How do you think Savile Row stays in business?
post #28 of 74
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threadhead View Post

Regarding Chipp/Winston Tailors:

Paul Winston would never mention JFK as a way to get a client. He has been in the business for 50 years and has plenty of funny stories about the clientele. If you want JFK's suit, then by all means ask to have one made from his pattern. If you want a suit made from Frank Sinatra's pattern, go to Alfred Dunhill. Anyone who goes to a tailor just because a living or dead celebrity shopped/endorsed/was paid by is either an idiot or has no sense of his own style. How do you think Savile Row stays in business?

looking at most Savile row firms sites, they also talk about clients now.

Name recognition and sometimes 100+ years of building a client base help quite a bit.

Being rather frank about Savile Row though they frequently do go bust and change ownership, the history of the firm and because they are institutions probably means there's always someone to bail them out.
Edited by David Reeves - 3/3/13 at 7:29am
post #29 of 74

No. I don't think that it's "bad form." I think that the norm now is that it's ok, unless the client says that it's not.


Edited by VinnyMac - 3/3/13 at 9:03am
post #30 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinnyMac View Post

No. It don't think that it's "bad form." I think that the norm now is that it's ok, unless the client says that it's not.

Also don't think it's bad form. Designers WANT to tie their clothing to prominent people so that the masses identify and want to look like X.
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