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What type of tie would you wear with this shirt?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

http://www.ctshirts.com/men's-shirts/view-all/Royal-and-white-herringbone-stripe-non--iron-extra-slim-fit-shirt?q=usddefault%7C%7CRR029RWH%7C%7C%7C%7C%7C1862,%7C%7C%7C%7C%7C%7C%7C%7C

 

 

What color/pattern would look nice?

post #2 of 17

I'd actually wear it with a fun patterned tie, like the one pictured with it. I don't really know if a monochromatic tie would look right with it. Although, if you're brave a light pink tie could work.

post #3 of 17
very difficult to pair well. I have a similar shirt and I hardly ever wear it.
post #4 of 17
Navy and solid or nearly solid, like the one in the pic, is probably your only hope. Texture could be good, so navy grenadine or a navy knit.
post #5 of 17
that's an atrocious looking shirt, so there's no tie I would wear with it
post #6 of 17

A predominant single colour, such as navy or midnight blue (e.g. my avatar photo), with at most a simple pattern (not a diagonal stripe), such as low density spots. A silk knitted tie would go well here. Yellow will cause a colour clash with the blue if you want to be avant guard.

 

This looks like the Charles Tyrwhitt sale/ intro offer. I think it throws in a spare tie.

 

Be aware the cotton quality is poor. They do a few Egyptian cotton shirts, which are considered by many to be the best quality cotton, one is in white/pink the other is white but in their 'premier' range. This isn't Egyptian cotton.

 

I put an order in for a few, but to be honest I'm really wanting the collars and cuffs for alterations on existing shirts. It would be nice to have an indepth thread on shirts.


Edited by Hacking jacket - 2/28/13 at 7:46am
post #7 of 17

I used to have a similar coloured/patterned shirt (minus the herringbone weave). I found it worked best with lighter coloured summer outfits and more towards the informal end of the spectrum. For example, cream/beige/tan trousers plus a blue jacket. Or, cream jacket and dark trousers in any complementary shade. I only rarely wore it with suits, especially businessy ones, as I simply found it too dark against the navys and darker greys they tend to come in. Could look pretty cool with a cream/white suit though I don't think I ever tried that. Mostly, I found that I wore it open collar.

 

I know you asked about ties, but I think that comes at the problem from the wrong end. Really, the more pertinent question is what kind of outfits you'd wear the shirt with, and the tie choice comes thereafter. So, if you only wear it with informal summery outfits, you could go with ties with cream/pale-yellows/straw backgrounds, ties in silver/pale grey (eg. glen plaids), various dark/burnt orange shades, or even go for pastel pinks and the like. Alternatively, a very, very dark navy would also work, especially if it's solid or has a sparse/small scale repeating pattern. I'd still pair that combo with a summery/relatively informal outfit though, not a formal business suit. I would definitely avoid any sort of other stripe, both in the tie & jacket/suit, even if it's of a very different scale. The shirt already has multiple stripes going on within it, of you include the herringbone.

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacking jacket View Post


Be aware the cotton quality is poor.

is that right?
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacking jacket View Post

Be aware the cotton quality is poor.

Complete disagree. Tyrwhitt shirts are not made of the world's finest cotton, but it's just fine for an everyday dress shirt in the $40-$50 range.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdfast View Post

I used to have a similar coloured/patterned shirt (minus the herringbone weave). I found it worked best with lighter coloured summer outfits and more towards the informal end of the spectrum. For example, cream/beige/tan trousers plus a blue jacket. Or, cream jacket and dark trousers in any complementary shade. I only rarely wore it with suits, especially businessy ones, as I simply found it too dark against the navys and darker greys they tend to come in. Could look pretty cool with a cream/white suit though I don't think I ever tried that. Mostly, I found that I wore it open collar.

I know you asked about ties, but I think that comes at the problem from the wrong end. Really, the more pertinent question is what kind of outfits you'd wear the shirt with, and the tie choice comes thereafter. So, if you only wear it with informal summery outfits, you could go with ties with cream/pale-yellows/straw backgrounds, ties in silver/pale grey (eg. glen plaids), various dark/burnt orange shades, or even go for pastel pinks and the like. Alternatively, a very, very dark navy would also work, especially if it's solid or has a sparse/small scale repeating pattern. I'd still pair that combo with a summery/relatively informal outfit though, not a formal business suit. I would definitely avoid any sort of other stripe, both in the tie & jacket/suit, even if it's of a very different scale. The shirt already has multiple stripes going on within it, of you include the herringbone.

+1.
post #10 of 17

Solid navy or solid burgundy.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcammer View Post


is that right?

It is certain.

 

Precisely what you define as 'poor' is a good question. Here is my definition:

 

1. The weight of the cloth is never stated. 100 is a standard shirt weight particularly for e.g. twill, below this it is too heavy. 170+ is exceptionally good (thin).

2. The origin of the cotton is never stated, my shirtmaker is adamant Egyptian is the finest.

3. The cotton mill is never stated, e.g. Acorn is the cloth I prefer (a Lancashire mill, UK). There must be lots of quality Italian mills.

4. The location of the shirt construction is not stated, e.g. London, Italy

 

If none are stated then unless its a designer with an excellent reputation, e.g. Hermes or RL 'made in Italy', RLPL, then its not a good sign. The shirts in the CT introductory offer are £20-30 each ($30 - $45). The fact CT use Egyptian cotton as a selling point and charge the highest price for their Egyptian cotton white shirts suggests they think its good too.

 

Thomas Pink do a nice Imperial 170 at a reasonable price for quality check comparison (~£150).

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hacking jacket View Post

It is certain.

Precisely what you define as 'poor' is a good question. Here is my definition:

1. The weight of the cloth is never stated. 100 is a standard shirt weight particularly for e.g. twill, below this it is too heavy. 170+ is exceptionally good (thin).
2. The origin of the cotton is never stated, my shirtmaker is adamant Egyptian is the finest.
3. The cotton mill is never stated, e.g. Acorn is the cloth I prefer (a Lancashire mill, UK). There must be lots of quality Italian mills.
4. The location of the shirt construction is not stated, e.g. London, Italy

If none are stated then unless its a designer with an excellent reputation, e.g. Hermes or RL 'made in Italy', RLPL, then its not a good sign. The shirts in the CT introductory offer are £20-30 each ($30 - $45). The fact CT use Egyptian cotton as a selling point and charge the highest price for their Egyptian cotton white shirts suggests they think its good too.

Thomas Pink do a nice Imperial 170 at a reasonable price for quality check comparison (~£150).

1. Your price point for CT is a bit low. Obviously their retail price is way too high and we know that you should wait for a 4 for $200 deal at the least, but I think $40-$60 is a more realistic range. In any event, price points alone can be somewhat misleading with respect to quality.

2. They actually do advertise their regular line of shirts (or at least some of them) as Egyptian cotton. It is not in the shirt description but it is elsewhere on the website.

3. Your argument at best is that quality could be poor, not that it is. Only buying and wearing a shirt can definitely answer that question. I've worn nicer shirts but I don't expect the world for $50. The rest is speculation. They may be "poor" compared to shirts that retail at $600, but I've seen many lower quality shirts in my day. They are not a luxury shirt brand and should be seen as a basic dress shirt for $50. There's nothing wrong with this.

4. Heavier weights can in some cases be better, unless you want your white shirts to be totally seethrough. 80s 2 ply cotton is a perfectly fine standard and recommended starting point by many. I don't know where you get 100 as a starting point.

5. Are you seriously suggesting we compare a 25GBP shirt with a 150GBP shirt? One would certainly hope the more expensive one is nicer if you can get 6 of the cheaper ones for the same price. Nobody is saying Tyrwhitt makes shirts that are worth $230 so this comparison is absurd.
post #13 of 17

My point is the attractive price is in part reflected in the lower quality of the cotton.

Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

2. They actually do advertise their regular line of shirts (or at least some of them) as Egyptian cotton. It is not in the shirt description but it is elsewhere on the website.
 

The shirt in question is not Egyptian cotton. One regular shirt was Egyptian (pink, 16.5'' collar), the other was their 'superior' range (white, 16.5'' collar)  

 

3. Your argument at best is that quality could be poor, not that it is. Only buying and wearing a shirt can definitely answer that question. I've worn nicer shirts but I don't expect the world for $50. The rest is speculation. They may be "poor" compared to shirts that retail at $600, but I've seen many lower quality shirts in my day. They are not a luxury shirt brand and should be seen as a basic dress shirt for $50. There's nothing wrong with this.

Personal taste.

 

4. Heavier weights can in some cases be better, unless you want your white shirts to be totally seethrough. 80s 2 ply cotton is a perfectly fine standard and recommended starting point by many. I don't know where you get 100 as a starting point.

A. Heavier (<100) are less breathable, i.e. more sweat and cheaper. 170s perform superbly in the summer

B. ALL shirt fabric catalogues predominate with 100+ weight e.g. my cotton mill Acorn http://www.acornfabrics.com/

Here is the SF thread http://www.styleforum.net/t/181380/shirting-fabric-is-acorn-still-the-best-bet/

 

[Thomas Mason is another major mill (now Italian owned) and again their catalogues predominate with 100 weights: it is a consensus between durability and breathability]

post #14 of 17
I agree I'm comparing Jermyn St, shirtmakers against CT, but I'm really comparing quality vs. price.

Once you've a high end shirt it yours forever, you just keep replacing collars and cuffs. That's value.
post #15 of 17

The shirt is a little too "loud" in my opinion and definitely suffers in the complementary tie department because of this. If you are set on buying it then a mid to light grey suit with a solid burgundy tie wouldn't look terrible.

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