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English or italian

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
After being on this board a few months, it seems the majority of people here prefer the Italian style over the English style of suiting. I know the lines are blurred these days in distinction. I myself prefer the English style more then what some would consider the more fashion forwardness of the Italians. I would like to have a debate(a friendly one) on which ideology each one of you prefer, English or Italian and perhaps a brief description why... TIA....
post #2 of 20
It's difficult to group it by country like that - there are huge differences between say, Anderson & Sheppard (drape cut,)  H. Huntsman (military precision,) Brioni (Roman style,) Luciano Barbera (Milanese style,) Stefano Ricci (Florentine style,) and Isaia (Neopolitan style.) There are endless other variations as well. Each house has it's own preferred cut or cuts. I do prefer Italian firms over English because they tend to blend English style with their own local flavor.
post #3 of 20
I must confess my ignorance on this topic. Other than higher set armholes,and side vents,I am not familiar with what distinguishes English tailoring from Italian. If I am not highjacking this thread,would Andrew (or anyone else) please compare and contrast the differences among the numerous English and Italian suit makers? Thank you for your help. Mitch  
post #4 of 20
You know, there is a lot written in books and articles about this topic - much of it contradictory.  And, in practice, it's hard to make definitive observations.  I mean, one would never mistake a Neapolitan giacca for an English hacking jacket.  But between such extremes, to me, there is a lot of overlap.  I wear many Italian brand suits and jackets such as Brioni, Isaia, Zegna and Canali.  They're all "Italian" but all different. As for preference, let me say this.  Always thought I liked the above-mentioned styles best.  Then I found a local tailor with a Saville Row background to make me some custom items.  He had been assistant to Teddy Watson at Hawes & Curtis.  So I said - "Do what you do best."  The suits this gentleman made for me are so "English." They have a military formality, but elegant.  Very cool.  I carry myself differently when wearing them. So now, I don't know.  Does one have to prefer? Hope there is more discussion on this interesting topic.
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
I apologize for my question being too abstract. I know there is not exactly a line of definition but the overriding view to me at least, is that the classic british style are highly military-inspired which makes them comparatively more structured then what I would define as an italian design. A Harris, I always enjoy your posts as I have learn a lot from them, esp. the pics. So I figure my question could change to: What style or suiting one prefers, a more structured-type suit or suiting with softer features. I, myself enjoy both but lean towards the more structured variety probably because I am an engineer by trade. Keep your views flowing, I would like to hear everyone's comments. Thanks
post #6 of 20
I don't have huge shoulders, and am relatively slender/slight compared to the typical American guy, so I find that suits and jackets with high, narrow, and structured shoulders, high armholes, and waist suppression, suit me best. I'm an engineer by training as well, but I doubt that this has influenced my personal style very much. Most engineers I know wear khakis nearly exclusively. I've found that "younger" designer lines like Emporio Armani and Helmut Lang generally work for me. In Luciano Barbera and Bruno Cucinelli, I look like I'm playing dress up.
post #7 of 20
I find Italian much better mainly due to the fit, and cut. Brit is way too sactorial, and it feels like it is suposed to fit a penguin. Also not a fan of the spread collar, but the Milanese collar is the pinical of excelence. Actulally I realy do not like Roman suiting such as Valentino and Birroni. But love Milanese (Dolce & Gabbana, Armani, Prada), Napolian (Ermenegildo Zegna), and Florentine (Gucci)
post #8 of 20
i choose suits based on the fabric, construction (for the price), and shape of the shoulder. i would have to agree with la guy in that i prefer narrow shoulders and a slim fit. that's because i'm slim and have narrow shoulders. i think men look best in clothes that look like them. anything else and i feel self-conscious, like i'm wearing a uniform. i definitely prefer clothes that move with me. i like to feel as though i can go and play soccer or basketball in my new suit and not have it be in the way. (not that i've tried this, yet.)
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Actulally I realy do not like Roman suiting such as Valentino and Birroni. But love Milanese (Dolce & Gabbana, Armani, Prada), Napolian (Ermenegildo Zegna), and Florentine (Gucci)
*thoroughly confused*
post #10 of 20
I like all Italian suiting except those from Rome which are namley Valentino and Birroni
post #11 of 20
Quote:
I like all Italian suiting except those from Rome which are namley Valentino and Birroni
*still confused*
post #12 of 20
Thracozaag: I think he is talking about the stylings of various Italian marques. For example the stylings of Valentino from Rome or Gucci from Milan, and etc.
post #13 of 20
But he's comparing fashion houses with tailoring firms. I don't get it. Gucci "styling" (if it can be called that) is essentially Milanese, not Florentine.
post #14 of 20
I know Gucci`s styling is Milanese, but Gucci is sitll made in Florence, not Milan. My main point was I do not like the Roman styling as much as the others. They are all fashion houses, with the exception of Birroni, which is also a taliloring firm, aswell as a fashion house, because it presents a runaway collection, hence a fashion house not just a tailoring firm,   I think the reason you think some of them are merely tailoring firms is because Birroni and Zegna`s collections are not normaly showcased at fashion weeks. Nonetheless they still do have collections
post #15 of 20
Quote:
I know Gucci`s styling is Milanese, but Gucci is sitll made in Florence, not Milan. My main point was I do not like the Roman styling as much as the others. They are all fashion houses, with the exception of Birroni, which is also a taliloring firm, aswell as a fashion house, because it presents a runaway collection, hence a fashion house not just a tailoring firm,   I think the reason you think some of them are merely tailoring firms is because Birroni and Zegna`s collections are not normaly showcased at fashion weeks. Nonetheless they still do have collections
Firstly, I assume you are talking about Brioni, if not please ignore the rest of the post. About runway shows: have you seen a Brioni show? --- they are actually not fashion shows nowadays.  There are two elements in a Brioni show: 1) a presentation of a specific fabric --- like the Super 220s they acquired from Australia in 2000, 2) a presentation of their sideline businesses (Sforza coats, etc.).  So if we are talking about suits, Brioni technically does not put up a fashion show for suits.  They still cut their suits pretty much the same way in most collections --- as they are mostly custom orders anyway, either from a bespoke client or from a department store.   Similarly, you will not see Gucci bespoke suits on the runway, which are partly made in the Zegna Napoli Couture workshop. Zegna, on the other hand, (the regular Zegna at least) is quite a fashion house; so you'll find us mentioning Zegna very little on this board.  Regular Zegna = Gucci (in my opinion). I think Thracozaag was confused about how you put tailoring houses and designers together.  For example, please find similarities between Valentino and Brioni?  Most designers adhere to the Milanese style, and Florence is still reserved as a leather capital.  None of Gucci's clothing line is produced in Florence.  Of course Florentine leather goods deserve another thread of its own altogether. As Mr. Harris mentioned, diversity of styling goes beyong country borders.  One could spot a Huntsman suit at a distance, but you will find plenty of 'copy-cats' of Anderson & Sheppard's soft tailoring style even in Italy, and the tailors of A&S had not changed their styles for the past 40, 50 years.   "I find Italian much better mainly due to the fit, and cut. Brit is way too sactorial, and it feels like it is suposed to fit a penguin.  Also not a fan of the spread collar, but the Milanese collar is the pinical of excelence. Actulally I realy do not like Roman suiting such as Valentino and Birroni. But love Milanese (Dolce & Gabbana, Armani, Prada), Napolian (Ermenegildo Zegna), and Florentine (Gucci)." Again, the defining element goes way beyond country borders.  However, one important thing is to always compare apple to apple.  Never compare an Amies bespoke suit with a Versace suit.  And by the way, (excuse my ignorance) what is a Milanese shirt collar?
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