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[Shadow community thread, you may bring your snack ] - Page 10

post #136 of 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwjp View Post

Not entirely sure what I was expecting, but it certainly wasn't that puzzled.gif


post #137 of 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by noob View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
LOL
Well I think I'm unaware of a lot of historical context, but I was left with a lot of unanswered questions. I enjoyed the scenes with the Rolling Stones, that was a really neat insight to the recording process. But what were the voice-overs? Were they relevant at all? "All about Eve"? Who was she? I can appreciate the "meta-ness" of filming a documentary team in a documentary style, and I can appreciate the stylistic choices of the woods and the yes and no answers, but it's still left me baffled. Although maybe that's the point? Does she represent hippy politics? And the militia in the junk yard - Black Power? That didn't feel explained. Why did they throw the guns all the way one way and then throw them all the way the other way? And the graffiti? And the magazine shop? It felt like 90% of the film went over my head shog[1].gif Hopefully someone can enlighten me.
Something I noticed: despite there being a lot of talking in the film, it felt as if the director didn't care whether the audience heard it or not (with the exception of the voice-overs) - I was constantly straining to hear over the sound of foghorns, feedback, gunshots, other people talking, passing trains etc.
post #138 of 257
Thanks, jwjp! I prefer to withhold my own thoughts for the moment, but I can answer some of your more objective questions. biggrin.gif

Just as background and by way of introduction:

The film was meant to be known as One Plus One. The new title, Sympathy for the Devil, as well as the song's final or album version, were added later, and without Godard's consent, to capitalize on the involvement of The Rolling Stones. Upon learning of this at the film's premiere at the London Film Festival in 1968, Godard reportedly rose from his chair, belted the producer, and stormed out of the theater.

The voice overs are a mixture of both political texts and pornographic literature with the names of the protagonists replaced by political figures. The narrator claims to be a Bolivian revolutionary exiled to the more scatological bits of London (possibly even a public restroom).

The black militants read from Blues People, Amiri Baraka's study of Afro-American culture published under the pseudonym LeRoi Jones (in another segment, one of the reporters asks, Did you call LeRoi Jones?) as well as a smattering of more revolutionary texts, including a Black Panther book and (I think) something by Eldridge Cleaver.

The woman interviewed is a character named Eve Democracy, played by the objectively luscious Anne Wiazemsky. Wiazemsky also plays the graffitist seen defacing / sloganizing / (detourning?) cars, walls, and buildings with spray paint, though it's unclear -- at least to me -- whether she represents Eve Democracy, or another fictional character, or the actress herself (ie are the graffiti scenes another documentary section or not?, etc.)

Discuss.



.
Edited by noob - 3/30/13 at 1:38am
post #139 of 257


I RODE THE TANK WITH BARNEY FRANK WHEN THE BLITZKRIEG RAGED AND THE BODIES ALSO RAGED ...


I RODE THE TANK IN THE GENERAL'S RANK WHEN THE BLITZKRIEG RAGED AND THE BODIES STANK




Yo...you guys watch this yet?

I'm tempted to post a brief outline/study guide ...

Though I'm totally inexpert and crave your e-pinions.
post #140 of 257
Is the full movie available on Dropbox? I'm only catching 14 minutes of it...
post #141 of 257
Oh, and does anyone still have the file for Hanabi's English subtitles?
post #142 of 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by thewho13 View Post

Oh, and does anyone still have the file for Hanabi's English subtitles?

I restored them to the folder, if you still need them.
post #143 of 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by noob View Post

Problems of perspective. So many head-on shots straight out of Spike Lee... some straight up 1st person or character POV's, then...

...occasional lapses into....what?Who? Another character? Man on the street? (Woman at the table?) How? Why? Very inconsistent, and in the end, confusing. Again, I've seen it work in other films; here, I just don't know what point it's serving...

This is an absurd criticism.
post #144 of 257
How do you figure....did you watch the scene I capped? Camera floating off in the mid-distance, obscured, occasionally, by some random fuzzy head. Comes out of nowhere, unrepeated, no apparent point to it. Just felt distracting and amateur-ish. What am I missing?
post #145 of 257
Well it's strange to me that it would even occur to you to compare a shot of a guy walking in a parking lot with a shot of two seated people talking -- nobody would shoot those things identically. I used "absurd" only because you wrote "problems of perspective" which I find presumptuous.

As for the unfamiliar and arbitrary-seeming aspects, I'd be comfortable attributing them to (one the one hand) cultural differences in the cinematic language, since Japan in particular (alongside German Expressionism and the French New Wave) had some distinct ideas about cinematography and film aesthetics, and (on the other hand) an intentional reaction to and deconstruction of what were becoming deadening conventions.

A director named Yasujiro Ozu is the best example I can remember: he used lots of very long takes with unusual or nonexistent camerawork (e.g. breaking with the standard geography of the 180-degree rule, shooting from an unconventional height) and one interpretation was that the viewpoint was meant to simulate that of a Japanese observer, i.e. kneeling (explaining the chest-height camera) and motionless.
post #146 of 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTribe View Post

Well it's strange to me that it would even occur to you to compare a shot of a guy walking in a parking lot with a shot of two seated people talking -- nobody would shoot those things identically. I used "absurd" only because you wrote "problems of perspective" which I find presumptuous.

laugh.gif Well, I was aiming for concise, not presumptuous. I lack a good film vocabulary, but *perspective* seemed to fit. And I don't think it's too out of bounds to compare the two. Each film -- even a *film with no rules!* -- establishes its own rules, and when it veers from them, you tend to notice. I did wonder, being mostlly unfamiliar with Asian cinema, if this was a cultural thing, but then, even in your Ozu example (whose Criterion titles I've seen), the startling bits, for lack of a better word, are a habit, even routine. Even when the logic isn't immediately apparent, it never feels arbitrary. Here, I went looking for the intention and didn't find it.
post #147 of 257
Will post mine later tonight. I decided to go against my original choice, a little too lengthy and it's split into three huge parts so it's a nightmare. Next choice is more accessible but nonetheless one of my favorites.
post #148 of 257


Un Prophète - Jacques Audiard [2009]

I saw this a few years ago and fell in love. Everything is pretty much spot on...pacing, shots, soundtrack. Some of you probably may have seen it already but I recommend watching it again. It's on Sipang's list of French Films Required Reading. A great "gangster" movie but filled with lots of emotion and drama and action in just the right spots, interesting characters, and overall just a plain fun film to watch. Highly recommend.



My original choice was All About Lily Chou-chou which I will recommend you guys to watch if you can source it. It's a great Japanese film with an amazing soundtrack, but it is kind of a difficult watch in that it's very long and a little convoluted (as is a lot of Japanese cinema is, I feel) but nonetheless interesting. Plus, you can pretty much pause it on any frame and slap some random Japanese clothing brand on it to re-purpose it.

post #149 of 257
I've seen both Prophete and Lily Chou-Chou, and, TBH, I much preferred the latter. At least that's my current impression. Will give a re-watch, though, and see how my feelings change.peepwall[1].gif
post #150 of 257
hah i've seen that quite a bit ... no problem rewatching it though.
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