or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › An experiment in beauty
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

An experiment in beauty - Page 5

post #61 of 84
The event may have been more interesting if it had been genuine, rather than being staged with an almost "prankish" air.

A couple of decades ago I was walking home late one night through San Francisco's Chinatown.
The streets were empty with a slight mist blowing.
Deep inside one of the old storefronts along Grant street, a gentleman was playing an erhu, a Chinese violin.
The music echoed as it drifted down the street, amplified by the horn like structure of the storefront.
It was the most beautiful, soulful sound I have ever heard.
I stood still for some time and listened.
Even today, when everything in the world seems so fucked up, I can remember and I feel okay, because I know beauty exists.

But that was an authentic event, not staged.
Authenticity is a basic requirement of beauty.
post #62 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by caelte View Post
...

But that was an authentic event, not staged.
Authenticity is a basic requirement of beauty.

WRONG!
post #63 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augusto86 View Post
WRONG!

I am WRONG!!!
post #64 of 84
I like the direction this thread is taking....

Redcaimen, I suppose I can see what you're saying, I just didn't read anything classist or even all that elitist into the article. Like I said earlier, it doesn't surprise me that the majority of people kept walking; not everyone like classical music, and plenty of those who do may have had somewhere truly important to be. But I have to think that there were more than just 9 people (I believe it was 9?) who *did* like classical music and *weren't* on such a tight schedule that they couldn't bask for a couple minutes... and still, no one stopped. I'm not judging them, but I just find it sad that people don't take more time to appreciate random beauty. Like Huntsman, I'd say that part of my whole approach to life involves making time for things like that.
post #65 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augusto86 View Post
All I will say is that most of the most brilliant writers and social critics have been patronizing and rude: Twain, Mencken, Wilde, Adams, Vonnegut(RIP). Sometimes a message has to be a slap in the face. I can understand being in a hurry, and obviously you pick your battles. I have hurried by many a thing to see my girlfriend or a concert. Like I said, I'm a musician and this was personally more affecting.
Most witty critics are extremely rude. Their gift is for making a large amount of enemies. Take Alexander Woolcott or the Sitwell clan. If, in fact, they were alive today, they would be trolling the internets. Even T.S.Eliot was not beyond naming people he thought stupid. For example, he names a Mr.Symons in his "A Perfect Critic" essay.
post #66 of 84
In some ways it is sad, but understandable.

People have their tastes in music and art, I know for one if any of my friends would have seen him there they wouldn't have spared a passing glance. I would have stopped to see this master at work.

It's all a matter of opinion.

JB
post #67 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
"That and a buck fifty will buy you a cup of coffee."

Not at Starbucks ...
post #68 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by eg1 View Post
Not at Starbucks ...
I knew I was walking into that. But from what I hear a drip there is still somewhere around $1.50, but then again, why would you buy their coffee anyway?
post #69 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
I knew I was walking into that. But from what I hear a drip there is still somewhere around $1.50, but then again, why would you buy their coffee anyway?

A)$1.63 Tall in Boston.

B)Because you work there

C)Please God if you have any mercy keep this thread from becoming a 'Bux thread!
post #70 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Augusto86 View Post
A)$1.63 Tall in Boston.

B)Because you work there

C)Please God if you have any mercy keep this thread from becoming a 'Bux thread!

You ready for plan b?

Jon.
post #71 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by JetBlast View Post
In some ways it is sad, but understandable.

People have their tastes in music and art, I know for one if any of my friends would have seen him there they wouldn't have spared a passing glance. I would have stopped to see this master at work.

It's all a matter of opinion.

JB

Inasmuch as I would like to say that I would have stayed to listen. Seeing as:

A) I like classical music
B) Am fairly well-versed with the genre repertoire

I can easily post that I would have stayed and listened, but without actually facing that particular circumstance, I would be lying and so would every one of you. Perhaps one of the 1100 people that walked by noticed that the music was very good and they wanted to stay, but had some other, more pressing matters which to them was more important than listening to music at that particular moment in the history of time.

Jon.
post #72 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saucemaster View Post
I like the direction this thread is taking....

Redcaimen, I suppose I can see what you're saying, I just didn't read anything classist or even all that elitist into the article. Like I said earlier, it doesn't surprise me that the majority of people kept walking; not everyone like classical music, and plenty of those who do may have had somewhere truly important to be. But I have to think that there were more than just 9 people (I believe it was 9?) who *did* like classical music and *weren't* on such a tight schedule that they couldn't bask for a couple minutes... and still, no one stopped. I'm not judging them, but I just find it sad that people don't take more time to appreciate random beauty. Like Huntsman, I'd say that part of my whole approach to life involves making time for things like that.

Giving you a proper explanation of my response to the article would require a lot of thinking and digressions on my part and Im just too lazy and my thoughts so unfocused the effort would be too much. It would put a serious crimp in my dicking around on the Internet time. I'll just say we reap what we sow and lets see, one more phrase...hhmmmm. We must cultivate our own garden.
post #73 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by redcaimen View Post
Giving you a proper explanation of my response to the article would require a lot of thinking and digressions on my part and Im just too lazy and my thoughts so unfocused the effort would be too much. It would put a serious crimp in my dicking around on the Internet time. I'll just say we reap what we sow and lets see, one more phrase...hhmmmm. We must cultivate our own garden.

I hear you. Never sacrifice your dicking around on the Internet time.
post #74 of 84
What I'm gathering from a bunch of posts is that it's a shame that people didn't stop to admire some classical music that they just happened to pass on their way to work. And again, I'm biased because I'm a violinist myself, but this was so much more than just some random classical music. This wasn't just some average guy or student playing some ordinary violin with intonation problems... this was one of the most talented violinists in the entire world playing some of the most perfect music (Bach Chaconne, Gavotte, etc.) on a 300 year old violin that's valued at $4 million dollars - in other words, the best of the best of the best... this was a "perfect storm", and it's a shame that only a handful of people recognized this.
post #75 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by amerikajinda View Post
What I'm gathering from a bunch of posts is that it's a shame that people didn't stop to admire some classical music that they just happened to pass on their way to work. And again, I'm biased because I'm a violinist myself, but this was so much more than just some random classical music. This wasn't just some average guy or student playing some ordinary violin with intonation problems... this was one of the most talented violinists in the entire world playing some of the most perfect music (Bach Chaconne, Gavotte, etc.) on a 300 year old violin that's valued at $4 million dollars - in other words, the best of the best of the best... this was a "perfect storm", and it's a shame that only a handful of people recognized this.

Well again, context is very important. Also, pros have been known not to be able to not recognize a Strad or DG on sound alone, not to mention that almost no one can tell by looking at one.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Entertainment and Culture
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Entertainment and Culture › An experiment in beauty