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AP College Board Results and Racial Gaps

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Not very surprising, unless you look at the facts closely: these stats show that even when some minorities are given access to AP-level courses, they don't take them:

http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/rtn/9th-annual/9th-annual-ap-report-double-page.pdf
Quote:
Originally Posted by College Board 
All students who are academically ready for the rigor of AP® —
no matter their location, background, or socioeconomic status —
have a right to fulfill that potential. Last year, however, hundreds
of thousands of prepared students in this country either did not take an
available AP subject for which they had potential or attended a school that
did not offer the subject.

In most subject areas, black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, and American Indian/Alaska
Native students who have the same AP readiness as their white and Asian/
Asian American/Pacific Islander peers are significantly less likely to experience
such AP course work. Take, for example, AP course work in mathematics
(see facing page). Among 10 Asian/Asian American/Pacific Islander students
with strong likelihood of success in an AP math course, 6 take that course,
whereas 4 in 10 white, 3 in 10 Hispanic/Latino, 3 in 10 black/African American,
and 2 in 10 American Indian/Alaska Native students do.

post #2 of 18
Thread Starter 
Some state by state results; I'm a bit surprised at Florida and Georgia's placement on this list

edit: These numbers are based on the denominator being all students that graduated in 2012


Edited by furo - 2/20/13 at 1:44pm
post #3 of 18
It says students who have a "high potential for success." That's going to be a smaller group than those who just have access. The graph at the bottom suggests that the great majority of students take at least one AP class, though with black students it's only about 2/3, and less than half of those pass one.

When I was in high school we didn't have AP classes; were just encouraged to go take actual college classes at the local junior college. Are AP classes supposed to be better than that?
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

It says students who have a "high potential for success." That's going to be a smaller group than those who just have access.

The graph at the bottom suggests that the great majority of students take at least one AP class, though with black students it's only about 2/3, and less than half of those pass one.

Fair point, I have no idea how they determined who was in the category of "high or AP-potential."
post #5 of 18
Indiana isn't on the list. confused.gif
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by furo View Post

Some state by state results; I'm a bit surprised at Florida and Georgia's placement on this list

Eat sh** and die, Yanqui.
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
What's pretty sad is that even in the best state only 30% are scoring 3 or better.

A 3 normally isn't good enough for college credit.
post #8 of 18
didn't bother reading the article, but AP tests are expensive ya know
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by furo View Post

What's pretty sad is that even in the best state only 30% are scoring 3 or better.

A 3 normally isn't good enough for college credit.

It depends. UW-Madison, as an example, will normally take a 3, but just give you general credits, while requiring you get a 4 or 5 to get the class counted. So for AP Calc, a 3 gets you 3 math credits, but a 4 gets you waived from Calc I and 5 credits.

The scores are bell-curved, and if you look at figure 4, you'll see that about 65-70% of all AP exams taken in MA received a score of 3 or above. I'm sure the disparity is explained because the students scoring well, take numerous exams.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

didn't bother reading the article, but AP tests are expensive ya know

Is that true? I don't remember them being expensive back when I was a lad. If they were more than $25 back then I'd be surprised.

EDIT -
Quote:
Fees
The fee for each exam is $89.

The fee for exams administered at schools outside of the United States, U.S. territories and commonwealths, and Canada, with the exception of U.S. Department of Defense Dependents Schools (DoDDS) is $117 per exam.

Fees per exam vary at some private College Board-authorized testing centers outside the United States.

Occasionally, extreme circumstances make it necessary for students to test late using an alternate form of the exam. Depending on the reasons for late testing, schools may be charged an additional fee, part or all of which the school may ask students to pay. Learn more about late testing.

Note: If you are testing at a school that is not your own, the Coordinator may ask you to pay a different fee to recover the additional proctoring and administration costs.

Fee Reductions
Fee reductions of $28 per exam are available from the College Board for students with financial need. In addition, schools forgo their $8 rebate for each fee-reduced exam, making the final fee for these students $53 per exam. In addition, most states offer exam subsidies to cover all or part of the remaining cost for eligible students.

Talk to your AP Coordinator to learn more about fee reductions, state and federal subsidies and other support that may be available to you.


http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/cal_fees.html

I mean, I guess $53 isn't money to throw away if you know you have absolutely no shot at passing the test, but if you've got a chance at it I can't see $53 standing in someone's way.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Is that true? I don't remember them being expensive back when I was a lad. If they were more than $25 back then I'd be surprised.
Quote:
Fees
The fee for each exam is $89.

The fee for exams administered at schools outside of the United States, U.S. territories and commonwealths, and Canada, with the exception of U.S. Department of Defense Dependents Schools (DoDDS) is $117 per exam.

Fees per exam vary at some private College Board-authorized testing centers outside the United States.

some school systems (rich, white) pay for the exams themselves. some do not. you can get fee reductions, but not waivers, and you have to prove financial hardship.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

It depends. UW-Madison, as an example, will normally take a 3, but just give you general credits, while requiring you get a 4 or 5 to get the class counted. So for AP Calc, a 3 gets you 3 math credits, but a 4 gets you waived from Calc I and 5 credits.

The scores are bell-curved, and if you look at figure 4, you'll see that about 65-70% of all AP exams taken in MA received a score of 3 or above. I'm sure the disparity is explained because the students scoring well, take numerous exams.

Good catch; it appears that the percentages in the first figure are reflective of all high school graduates, regardless of having taken any AP classes or not. I was wondering why the percentages were so low, but figure 4 (and the appendix on the last page) does make a lot more sense when you look at all the score distributions of those who actually took the test.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by harvey_birdman View Post

Is that true? I don't remember them being expensive back when I was a lad. If they were more than $25 back then I'd be surprised.

EDIT -
http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/cal_fees.html

I mean, I guess $53 isn't money to throw away if you know you have absolutely no shot at passing the test, but if you've got a chance at it I can't see $53 standing in someone's way.

let's say you're taking 6 AP exams though (or more, some classes allow you to take 2 or even 3 exams), it adds up. and $53 is assuming you get waivers on them all.
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post


some school systems (rich, white) pay for the exams themselves. some do not. you can get fee reductions, but not waivers, and you have to prove financial hardship.

My school district did that when I was in high school. It was phased out senior year, so junior year, I took all the exams they'd pay for (any associated with an AP class taken). Senior year, I didn't take ones I didn't care about (English) because going into engineering, I didn't need the credits, but had the district paid, I would have to get out of school for another day.

It also really pissed off my English teacher when I showed up because she wanted the day off, but instead had to babysit the two of us who didn't take the exam.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teger View Post

let's say you're taking 6 AP exams though (or more, some classes allow you to take 2 or even 3 exams), it adds up. and $53 is assuming you get waivers on them all.

It can be, but compared to the cost of a class.... AP tests can windup reducing the time you need to stay in school by a semester too which is a huge opportunity cost savings.
post #15 of 18
Scarphe, you are just the worst.
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