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WTF over-zealous police? - Page 64

post #946 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

Don't H8 the playa, H8 the game.

I'll H8 whomever I like, thank you very much.
post #947 of 6095
The ATF earned a horrible reputation in the 1990s. It looks like some legitimate investigative agency should turn the tables and infiltrate the ATF.

In short, this was a case of one motorcycle gang investigating a rival motorcycle gang.

I read stories like these and run the oath of office ("protect and defend" blah blah blah) in the background of my mind. Just for laughs.
Quote:
A federal judge on Tuesday gave another black eye to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, issuing a scathing rebuke of the agency's handling of the career and security of one of its own -- celebrated undercover agent Jay Dobyns, who infiltrated the notorious Hells Angels.

After a costly six-year legal battle, Judge Francis Allegra, with the federal claims court in Washington, D.C., chastised the ATF for failing to adequately protect Dobyns and his family from the gang.

The motorcycle gang had sought retribution after the agent's undercover work during Operation Black Biscuit, which brought 16 indictments against them including charges of murder and racketeering.

Threats against Dobyns included threats to kill him and his family, gang-rape his wife, and infect Dobyns with the HIV virus.

Dobyns' house also was burned down in 2008 with his wife and children sleeping inside -- his family escaped unharmed. In the case, Dobyns said the ATF accused him of starting the fire. The arsonist was never caught.

"It is evident that ATF officials failed to follow through in implementing the steps that were supposed to minimize the risks that might affect Agent Dobyns and his family. In the court's view, this represented another instance in which ATF violated the covenant of good faith and fair dealing," Allegra wrote in his opinion.

A 2007 settlement, reached after Dobyns first claimed the agency improperly investigated and protected his family against threats, awarded him $373,000.

But Dobyns alleged a "breach of good faith," claiming the agency continued to retaliate against him. Allegra, in his opinion, awarded Dobyns $173,000 in damages.

Dobyns, who is currently out of the country at a motivational speaking event, posted a lengthy statement on his website claiming vindication.

"This was never about a cash-out to leverage me into silence. This always was, has been, and will continue to be about the restoration of dignity that the federal government stole from me," he wrote.

Asked for comment on Tuesday, a Justice Department official told Fox News: "We have received and are reviewing the Court's decision. We have no further comment at this time."

The ATF managers involved in the case happen to be the same senior officials in Arizona who mishandled the Operation Fast and Furious case -- the botched anti-gunrunning sting -- including Agent in Charge Bill Newell and his assistant George Gillett.

The opinion said Gillett and another agent "purposely slowed" the probe into Dobyns' house fire and said despite Gillett's claims that he did not view Dobyns as a suspect, "every indication was that he did." The judge also said "there is strong indication" that Gillett at least "tacitly approved" of a decision to tape-record conversations with Dobyns in 2008 without his knowledge.

Allegra wrote that "it appears that ASAC Gillett purposely attempted to shield critical investigative information from senior ATF officials and did so, knowing full well that he was not complying with the procedures used for filing information."

Allegra likened the case to the Franz Kafka novel, "The Trial," where "Kafka depicts a totalitarian state in which the government suppressed freedom via a deluge of circuitous and irrational process," including acquittals that don't really remove the threat of legal charges.

"Experiences like these unfortunately bring to mind those that Agent Dobyns experienced," he wrote. "A time that should have been one of healing and reconciliation, but that instead gave certain ATF officials and agents the opportunity to harm Agent Dobyns further. In the court's view, the actions of these ATF employees indisputably breached the covenant of good faith and fair dealing. ... Hopefully, this will bring this Kafkaesque story to an end."

Dobyns recently retired from the agency with his badge and full pension and is now on the speaking circuit.

Other agents expressed disappointment with Tuesday's decision and said the relatively modest award will discourage whistleblowers and wronged agents from coming forward with information about the agency.

Dobyns, a decorated agent, best-selling author and former star football player at the University of Arizona, joined ATF out of college. During his first week on the job at age 26, Dobyns was shot. He fell in love with undercover work, and was asked to infiltrate the Hells Angels.

Shaving his head, getting "fully sleeved" with tattoos shoulder to wrist, bulking up and essentially leaving his family behind, Dobyns became Jay "Bird" Davis, a chain-smoking, Harley-riding renegade.

Dobyns was invited to join the gang only after "killing" the leader of a rival gang, the Mongols. In fact, the shooting death was staged, complete with a Hollywood make-up artist and a dead cow used to splatter the victims' clothing with blood and brain matter.

Allegra, in his decision, also denied government claims for royalties from Dobyns' book.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/09/16/judge-rebukes-atf-for-gaps-in-protecting-agent-who-infiltrated-hells-angels/
post #948 of 6095
The federal government bus is always big enough to have one more person thrown under its wheels.
post #949 of 6095
post #950 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Twenty three minute audio of the entire thing: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-actress-daniele-watts-questioned-by-lapd-audio-20140915-htmlstory.html

I am not unsympathetic to her position.

 

Missionary, doggie or reverse cowgirl?  Not listening unless I can have an accurate visual in my head.

post #951 of 6095
This is more the school than police, but:


Quote:
A Westville eighth-grader is serving a five-day suspension from school for waving what appeared to be a gun in the school parking lot.

As it turned out, the 13-year-old boy was in possession of a laser pointer, which police view as dangerous even if it's not shaped like a firearm.

...

Kellems said the LaPorte County Sheriff's has firearms with lasers built in and attached for accuracy so that's why one shaped like a gun even if it's just used for fun is a recipe for potential disaster with police on hand who could mistake the laser for a firearm.

It's also against the law in Indiana to point a laser at a police officer because the beam of light can blur vision if shined in the eye, said Kellems, who once arrested a LaPorte student for shining a laser in his face when he was a school liason officer.
http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/laporte/city-of-laporte/westville-students-suspended-for-laser-pointer/article_5e515009-5a29-514f-946e-4815df7b6569.html
post #952 of 6095
Quote:
It's also against the law in Indiana to point a laser at a police officer because the beam of light can blur vision if shined in the eye, said Kellems, who once arrested a LaPorte student for shining a laser in his face when he was a school liason officer.

Laser pointers can permanently blind people, so it's not terribly ridiculous to arrest somebody for. A lot of the cheapo ones, which are ostensibly safe, have well over the power levels required to cause permanent instantaneous vision damage. Some of the things are as much as 50x the safety threshold, just poor quality control.

Some of the more powerful ones can instantaneously blind people from a kilometer or more away.


Sounds like the first kid may not have even turned the thing on, so that wouldn't fly as a reason if it were the case. Unless possession of pointers is banned at school, which it might be.
post #953 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

Laser pointers can permanently blind people, so it's not terribly ridiculous to arrest somebody for. A lot of the cheapo ones, which are ostensibly safe, have well over the power levels required to cause permanent instantaneous vision damage. Some of the things are as much as 50x the safety threshold, just poor quality control.

Sure, so that's why it's a crime to shine one in the eyes of a cop, not a regular citizen. Fuck that noize.
post #954 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harold falcon View Post

Sure, so that's why it's a crime to shine one in the eyes of a cop, not a regular citizen. Fuck that noize.

I'm going to guess blinding somebody is a crime anywhere. But yeah, no reason the police need special protection from laser pointers.

I think it's a felony to light up aircraft with laser pointers now.
post #955 of 6095
I understand that laser pointers can indeed blind someone; however, shouldn't we maybe deal with people who blind others with laser pointers rather than wholesale suspend kids for possessing them? What good does it do anyone by suspending a kid who has a laser pointer?

Edit:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gibonius View Post

I'm going to guess blinding somebody is a crime anywhere. But yeah, no reason the police need special protection from laser pointers.

I think it's a felony to light up aircraft with laser pointers now.

I agree on #1. #2 is. They had someone around here get arrested not too long ago for doing just that.
post #956 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I understand that laser pointers can indeed blind someone; however, shouldn't we maybe deal with people who blind others with laser pointers rather than wholesale suspend kids for possessing them? What good does it do anyone by suspending a kid who has a laser pointer?

Edit:
I agree on #1. #2 is. They had someone around here get arrested not too long ago for doing just that.

Laser pointers don't blind people, people with laser pointers blind people.
post #957 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I understand that laser pointers can indeed blind someone; however, shouldn't we maybe deal with people who blind others with laser pointers rather than wholesale suspend kids for possessing them? What good does it do anyone by suspending a kid who has a laser pointer?

Kids in school always have fewer rights than normal people. They don't have any particular reason to have a laser pointer in school, they're distracting and potentially dangerous. Not exactly an imminent threat, but I can't find myself overly concerned about the occasional suspension for it.

Most of the blindings I've heard about have been kids screwing around with them in the bathroom and zaping themselves in the eyes off a mirror.
post #958 of 6095
Better not let them have butter knives at lunch. They are potentially dangerous.
post #959 of 6095
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harold falcon View Post

Better not let them have butter knives at lunch. They are potentially dangerous.

Fuck the knives, dood...butter?
post #960 of 6095
Pardon me, fat-free probiotic yoghurt knives.
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